Art Stage Singapore 2015: The signature art fair of Southeast Asia – round-up



Art Stage Singapore 2015 strengthens its status as “the” art fair of Southeast Asia.

The signature art fair in Singapore closed on 25 January 2015 with record sales, record-high attendance, and a programme of special projects as well as a curated section that re-asserted the success of its 2014-launched “We Are Asia” format. 

Public artwork 'Mystic Abode' by Paresh Maity, presented by Linda Gallery and Gallery Sumukha at Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Public artwork ‘Mystic Abode’ by Paresh Maity, presented by Linda Gallery and Gallery Sumukha at Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

The fifth edition of Art Stage Singapore (21 – 25 January 2015) saw the participation of 197 galleries from 29 countries – an increase of about 40 exhibitors compared to 2014, with 34 of those from Singapore. Roughly seventy percent of the total galleries present hail from Asia, with returning galleries comprising eighty percent. These numbers cement the fair’s status as a key player in the promotion of contemporary art from Asia and especially the Southeast. The total footfall also registered a significant increase, from 45,700 in 2014 to 51,000 in 2015 over the whole five-day period, including the vernissage on 21 January.

Returning galleries included such names as Aicon Gallery (New York/London), ARNDT, Pearl Lam Galleries, Galerie Perrotin, White Cube and Tomio Koyama Gallery, while New York’s Paul Kasmin Gallery and Opiom Gallery (France) were among the newcomers, and Yavuz Gallery, Richard Koh Fine ArtGajah Gallery and the Singapore Tyler Print Institute were among the returning Singaporean galleries.

Singapore Tyler Print Institute booth at Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Singapore Tyler Print Institute booth at Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

An innovative fair platform

This year’s edition also saw some exciting changes (PDF download) to its format. Whilst preserving the curated sales exhibition with the Southeast Asia Platform, the fair introduced a host of special projects, including:

  • special exhibitions by country (Russia, Malaysia and Korea)
  • a special exhibition of Modern Art
  • a Public Artworks section
  • Video Stage

In cooperation with the Embassy of the United States of America, the fair also inaugurated a new art prize, the Joseph Balestier Award for the Freedom of Art (PDF download), awarded to Indonesian artist FX Harsono for “his critical installation and performance work spans pro-democracy dissent to explorations of the experiences of ethnic minorities.”

Art Stage Singapore is also the pillar of the now established annual art festival in the city-state, Singapore Art Week, with its co-ordinated programmes held at a wide range of venues including galleries, institutions and museums. Quoted in the fair’s closing press release, Art Stage Singapore Director Lorenzo Rudolf said:

It is beautiful to see the cooperation between the fair, museums, art spaces as well as government agencies, all functioning seamlessly together. January in Singapore has become the focal point of the international art calendar. As the flagship fair of Southeast Asia, we take this responsibility very seriously to grow the fair and forge ahead in the interest of the region.

Presentation by Yavuz Gallery at Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Presentation by Yavuz Gallery at Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Emerging Southeast Asia

The 2014-launched Southeast Asia Platform – which in 2014 included eight curated sections divided by country – was continued this year, but with one single exhibition on one unifying theme. The curated sales exhibition embracing the whole of Southeast Asia included the work of 32 young and emerging artists from a variety of countries in the region, with the presence of their representing regional galleries and institutions.

One of the participating artists in the Platform, Singaporean Choy Ka Fai, told Wall Street Journal:

I’ve never [previously] seen, maybe, half the artists on the list. It’s a good way to expose young artists who are not working in the commercial scene.

The galleries, which normally would not have the funds to join the fair, were invited at a fraction of the cost of a normal booth. In an article on the Wall Street Journal Rudolf was quoted as saying:

Many galleries in Southeast Asia are economically not very strong. This platform gives certain galleries who would never have the possibility to rent space in a fair the chance to participate.

Art Stage Singapore 2015, Southeast Asia Platform Tour. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Art Stage Singapore 2015, Southeast Asia Platform Tour. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Curated by Singaporean independent curator Khim Ong, the exhibition entitled “Eagles Fly, Sheep Flock—Biographical Imprints: Artistic Practices in Southeast Asia” responds to Rudolf’s commitment to transforming the fair format into one that merges the commercial and non-commercial spheres of contemporary art, as he told Art Media Agency (AMA) in an interview:

What we are doing here in Singapore is something between an art fair, a marketplace, and a contemporary museum – something between commercial and non-commercial. We try to bring together market and education.

Choy Chun Wei, 'Shopping Ghettoes-Absolute Towers', 2010-11, mixed media on wood, 124 x 66 x 34 cm. Image courtesy Wei-ling Gallery.

Choy Chun Wei, ‘Shopping Ghettoes-Absolute Towers’, 2010-11, mixed media on wood, 124 x 66 x 34 cm. Image courtesy Wei-ling Gallery.

Creating an exhibition that brings together the diverse practices of the Southeast Asian region under a single curatorial concept can be viewed as a controversial step. However, Ong’s show bases itself within that diversity and aims to highlight the variety of approaches, visual languages and issues addressed by regional artists, and put them into a dialogue with each other. The curator told Wall Street Journal:

Every artist develops in his or her own way, although they may have common influences. I don’t think we can brand Southeast Asian art as a particular style, [but] these artists are based in Southeast Asia and reacting to their immediate environment.

Lim Wei-Ling, Director of Kuala Lumpur’s Wei-Ling Gallery, told Art Radar that this was the gallery’s second time being invited to participate in the Southeast Asia Platform of the fair. While in 2014 the gallery presented Anurendra Jegadeva’s room installation entitled MA-NA-VA-REH, this year it was Choy Chun Wei that took centre-stage. Lim said about the curated platform:

The curated sections lend the fair some weight and allow for audiences a better or deeper understanding of an artist and his practice.

The gallery was also able to successfully sell two large paintings by the artist.

Damine Hirst, 'Amorous', presented by White Cube at Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Damien Hirst, ‘Amorous’, presented by White Cube at Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

A collector’s haven between East and West

Art Stage Singapore brings both Asian and Western art to the region, making it possible for collectors to get acquainted with a wide range of artistic practices and find exceptional artworks without having to travel thousands of miles around the world. The top sale registered at the 2015 fair was Damien Hirst’s Amorous, a butterfly painting sold by White Cube for USD1.6 million to a regional collector on the first day of the fair.

Bringing Western artists to Asia is also a common practice for many other international galleries, such as this year’s new participant Paul Kasmin Gallery from New York, who told Wall Street Journal:

While we work to promote Asian artists in New York, it’s equally interesting to bring our American and European artists to audiences in the East. It’s this kind of international dialogue that we find most exciting.

Gilbert & George at Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Gilbert & George at Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Mr Jorge Perez, a collector from Miami and a newcomer to the fair, was quoted in the fair’s closing press release as saying:

It’s really fantastic and it’s very new for us because Asian art is not something we’re knowledgeable about so we’re learning…We have already made a couple of purchases and hopefully we’ll do some more.

Visitors to Art Stage tweeted their responses to the fair:

Bombardieri, 'Bagaglio/rhino', bronze, 55 x 38 x 44 cm. Image courtesy Mark Hachem Gallery.

Bombardieri, ‘Bagaglio/rhino’, bronze, 55 x 38 x 44 cm. Image courtesy Mark Hachem Gallery.

Mark Hachem Gallery attended the fair for the second time and confirmed to Art Radar a steady presence of notable collectors. Throughout the event, the gallery made sales to “very important collectors and museums in Singapore and the region,” including during the preview night, when the gallery sold six editions of Bombardieri’s bronze sculpture Bagaglio/Rhino and Yves Hayat’s digital prints.

Wei-Ling Gallery Director told Art Radar about her experience with collectors at the fair:

We met many Asian collectors (Japanese, Malaysian, and Singaporean) and a few European collectors who enjoyed the works tremendously. We also had the opportunity to catch up and touch base with curators and museum directors from around the region.

Santy Saptari, Deputy Director of Pearl Lam Galleries, Singapore, told Art Radar that the gallery sold to both Asian and international collectors, and further commented:

Our Singapore gallery shares the core mission of Pearl Lam Galleries to engage in cultural exchange and provide a platform for rising and established talents from the West and East to meet, interact and engage. We have a strong collector base in South East Asia and due to its geographical location, the gallery will have a special focus on Southeast Asian Art.

Matthias Arndt from ARNDT Contemporary Art told Art Radar that the gallery sold a work by Del Kathryn Barton for AUD85,000, one of Rodel Tapaya‘s for USD34,000 and a Gilbert and George work for GBP85,000 on preview night alone. In the following days, the gallery sold two artworks a day and on average, half at their gallery in Singapore and half at the fair. Arndt also noted that half of the collectors were Asian, while half were international. He commented about the importance of being present in Singapore:

Because Singapore and Art Stage are the gateway to Southeast Asia and the Pacific.

Indonesian Ambassador to Singapore His Excellency Dr Andri Hadi with Lorenzo Rudolf, watching Shintaro Miyake in action at Tomio Koyama Gallery booth, Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Indonesian Ambassador to Singapore His Excellency Dr Andri Hadi with Lorenzo Rudolf, watching Shintaro Miyake in action at Tomio Koyama Gallery booth, Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Singapore collectors were looking for both established and emerging talents. As reported by The Straits Times, Galerie Sogan & Art, for example, sold out all five charcoal works by Nanyang Academy of Fine Art graduate Henry Lee, priced between SD4,200 and SD7,500, and Jane Lee’s untitled mixed media work sold to a Singapore collector for USD38,000 within an hour of the vernissage. STPI sold several paper works by Australia-based Singapore artist Suzann Victor and sculptor Han Sai Por for prices ranging from SD4,000 and SD25,000. The article also quoted gallerist Roberta Dans of Artesan Gallery+Studio, who sold all six fabric pieces by Filipino artist Raffy T. Napay, as saying:

This fair has really matured. Collectors are no longer looking at regional artists as an afterthought.

out all five charcoal works by fresh Nanyang Academy of Fine Art graduate Henry Lee, priced between $4,200 and $7,500.

Jane Lee’s untitled mixed media work sold to a Singapore collector for US$38,000 within an hour of the vernissage.

- See more at: http://www.straitstimes.com/lifestyle/visual-arts/story/works-home-grown-artists-are-hot-art-stage-singapore-20150127#sthash.5m5nMYYY.dpuf

out all five charcoal works by fresh Nanyang Academy of Fine Art graduate Henry Lee, priced between $4,200 and $7,500.

Jane Lee’s untitled mixed media work sold to a Singapore collector for US$38,000 within an hour of the vernissage.

- See more at: http://www.straitstimes.com/lifestyle/visual-arts/story/works-home-grown-artists-are-hot-art-stage-singapore-20150127#sthash.5m5nMYYY.dpuf

Rudolf told The Jakarta Globe about the importance of nurturing collectors and VIPs coming to the fair and offering new educational experiences by involving other institutions and key players in the art scene:

Collectors today are used to being pampered and the approach that was initiated during my time at Art Basel was to create an entire new model and experiences targeted at the collectors. Collectors want specific programmes. Art Stage needs to build up a non-commercial programme while providing collectors unique experiences.

Nyoman Masriadi, 'Great Daddy', presented by Paul Kasmin Gallery at Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Nyoman Masriadi, ‘Great Daddy’, presented by Paul Kasmin Gallery at Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Art Stage Singapore vs Art Basel

There had been worries last year about how Art Basel’s move from May to March in Hong Kong would affect Art Stage Singapore. This year’s edition of the Singaporean fair, however, proved those doubts unfounded. As Rudolf told the Wall Street Journal, there was no drop-off in applications from galleries that he expected would only want to join one Asian fair within a period of three months:

I was, at the beginning, a bit worried if this date change would affect us. We are clearly covering the Southeast Asia area and Basel, the northern area. [...] If you have your own niche, you are much less attackable by a competitor.

Asked about how Singapore and Hong Kong interact on the Asian stage, Rudolf told The Jakarta Globe:

If Hong Kong is successful, Singapore will be successful and vice versa. There is much to learn from Hong Kong, even though it is purely market driven, while Singapore has a different market balance with institutions.

Asked why she thought it is important to have a presence in Singapore now, Wei-ling Gallery Director told Art Radar:

As Malaysians we share so much history with Singapore and have so many ties to them. It is wonderful that Singapore has taken the lead with being the gateway for art in Southeast Asia, something that is somewhat lacking in the rest of the region.

Curator Hongchul Byun at Special Exhibition-Korea,   Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Curator Hongchul Byun at Special Exhibition-Korea, Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Propelling Art Stage into the future

Now “the signature art fair” in Southeast Asia, Art Stage has already cemented its status as another key fixture on the Asian (and international) art calendar. The secret of its success lies in preserving its fresh perspective and its individual identity, positioned within the Singaporean art scene’s balance between commercial and non-commercial.

Rudolf told The Jakarta Globe how Asia needs to find such balance:

We have to be careful not to create a market that is bigger than the demand and we must carefully integrate Art Stage into the Southeast Asian environment. Many regional events are supporting and bringing up the market and are contributing through education. […] Art Stage can only survive in Singapore if we are at the heart of a healthy region so it is important we support the market all levels of galleries and the industry.

Presented by Yavuz Gallery at Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Presented by Yavuz Gallery at Art Stage Singapore 2015. Image courtesy Art Stage Singapore.

Asked about what he envisages for Art Stage in five years, Rudolf tells AMA:

I think what we’re seeing at the moment is a decentralisation in the art world, both in terms of the academic art world, and the art market. In Asia today, (and most likely in five, six, seven years as well), there are only two places that can host an international fair with real global importance, because there are only two places that are open enough. One is Hong Kong, the other is Singapore – all I can say is that I hope the one in Singapore is us! As I say, we are in a good position.

Rudolf is indeed positive about Singapore’s position in Asia, and Hong Kong, with its established Art Basel brand, does not pose a threat provided that Art Stage continues to follow its winning strategy:

We always have to be one step ahead of our main Asian competitor in Hong Kong – not copy, but be more creative and find new and exciting artists. We are creating our own identity, not competing but complementing. Asia is an emerging market, which needs interesting fairs on different levels and for different audiences.

C. A. Xuan Mai Ardia

619

Related Topics: art fairs, Southeast Asian artists, emerging artists, market watch, round-ups, events in Singapore

Related Posts:

Subscribe to Art Radar for more on the 2015 edition of art fairs around Asia and beyond

Crude oil and glass coffins: Taiwanese artist Shih Hsiung Chou in London – in pictures



Taiwanese artist Shih Hsiung Chou reinterprets the art of painting with crude oil, glass and perspex.

“Wait Until It Dries” is an exhibition of new works by acclaimed Taiwanese artist Shih Hsiung Chou. Currently on show in Shoreditch, London, the exhibition is the first stop of an international tour which will end at the Taipei Fine Art Museum in 2016.

Shih Hsiung Chou, 'Oil Painting', 2012, oil and Glass. Image courtesy the artist and Encounter Contemporary.

Shih Hsiung Chou, ‘Oil Painting’, 2012, oil and glass. Image courtesy the artist and Encounter Contemporary.

“Wait Until It Dries” (2015) opened at Encounter Contemporary last week in Ely’s Yard, Shoreditch, London. The show features works by up-and-coming Taiwanese artist Shih Hsiung Chou, who was a finalist in the Zabludowicz Future Map Prize (2013) and the winner of the Kaohsiung Museum Sculpture Award (2014). The exhibition runs until 6 February 2015.

Beyond brushes and canvases

The exhibition’s headlining series of works is titled “Oil Painting”, but Chou’s enigmatic creations hardly resemble one. Shunning canvases for glass and perspex, and using crude, black viscous oil instead of paint that dries, Chou’s unconventional works are at once mysterious and mischievous, fun and thought-provoking. This is Art writes:

Shih Hsiung Chou engages with art history by manipulating the notion of oil painting to his own ends, creating experiments with material and form that drastically challenge past concepts of painting.

Shih Hsiung Chou, 'Oil Painting', 2012, crude oil and perspex, 84 x 64 x 4 cm. Image courtesy the artist and Encounter Contemporary.

Shih Hsiung Chou, ‘Oil Painting’, 2012, crude oil and perspex, 84 x 64 x 4 cm. Image courtesy the artist and Encounter Contemporary.

The works consist of clear perspex forms filled with recycled oil. The black, viscous liquid – unique in colour, texture and its remarkable reflective qualities – contributes to “ever-dynamic artwork[s] shaped by whatever or whoever is reflected in it”. Chou has stated, quoted by the exhibition press release:

I intend to give the right to the audience [...] to form their own ideas when seeing their own reflection.

Shih Hsiung Chou, 'Oil Painting', 2013-2015, recycled engine oil, perspex, steel, 165 x 65 x 65 cm. Image courtesy the artist and Encounter Contemporary.

Shih Hsiung Chou, ‘Oil Painting’, 2013-2015, recycled engine oil, perspex, steel, 165 x 65 x 65 cm. Image courtesy the artist and Encounter Contemporary.

Elusive reflections

Chou’s choice of material immediately brings to mind British sculptor Richard Wilson’s legendary oil installation, 20:50 (1987). But while 20:50 stuns with its magnificent scale and transfixing stillness, Chou’s smaller pieces create a dynamic intimacy with the viewer, initiating what the press release calls a “psycho-physical exchange”:

[The reflections] invite our speculation yet resist any fixed form or final explanation. The dark ‘void’ space within Chou’s work remains allusive, [...] caught up in a continuous process of regeneration. Activated by the viewer, they are fixed in a state of flux, ever present, yet unknowable. [...] Chou’s artworks are not so much objects as endless impressions, fixed in a timeless frame.

Shih Hsiung Chou, 'Oil Painting', recycled engine oil and perspex, 160 x 120 x 6 cm. Image courtesy the artist and Encounter Contemporary.

Shih Hsiung Chou, ‘Oil Painting’, recycled engine oil and perspex, 160 x 120 x 6 cm. Image courtesy the artist and Encounter Contemporary.

The oil-filled spaces thus represent much more than simple reflective blank canvases, becoming a living meditation on the meaning of reality. The artist himself states in an interview with Chorus and Echo:

To be visible is to be present, to be absent is to be invisible, and visibility is a quality of light. I wanted to intercept the transmission of light on a transparent surface by using highly reflective materials to create another visibility. [The] meaning of my work is formed by the eyes of the audience… continually transforming itself.

Shih Hsiung Chou, 'Long Stay', 2012-2015, recycled engine oil and perspex, 190 x 60 x 45 cm. Image courtesy the artist and Encounter Contemporary.

Shih Hsiung Chou, ‘Long Stay’, 2012-2015, recycled engine oil and perspex, 190 x 60 x 45 cm. Image courtesy the artist and Encounter Contemporary.

Oil, coffins and death

Chou’s family is in the oil industry, a fact that sheds some light on his chosen medium. Francolin Press observed that “despite choosing art over the family business, [Chou's] identification with the substance, and indeed his loyalty towards it, provides the very foundation to his work.” The artist revealed:

In the environment I grew up in, many of our ordinary objects were printed with the trademark of the oil company, such as calendars and notebooks… therefore I have formed a very strong identity. [...] I feel such complete interest and identification with this material. Oil.

Shih Hsiung Chou, 'Long Stay', 2012-2015, recycled engine oil and perspex, 190 x 60 x 45 cm. Image courtesy the artist and Encounter Contemporary.

Shih Hsiung Chou, ‘Long Stay’, 2012-2015, recycled engine oil and perspex, 190 x 60 x 45 cm. Image courtesy the artist and Encounter Contemporary.

When asked by Chorus and Echo about the intentions behind one of his most striking pieces – a glass coffin filled with oil – Chou replied:

The coffin work was the first drawing that came into my head during this series. [...] At that moment I was considering the symbolism of a glass coffin and oil, and how they work together visually and/or symbolically. Whether it is a symbol of death, the end of the material society or the oil generation… It is too heavy for me to answer at this stage. [...] If there is anything I can say for this it is this: “death reveals human’s character, from the depth to the surface.”

Michele Chan

617

Related Topics: Taiwanese artists, oil, glass, sculpture, gallery shows, picture feasts, events in London

Related Posts:

Subscribe to Art Radar for more contemporary art from Taiwan

Six highlights from India Art Fair’s ‘Art Projects’



A specially curated section at India Art Fair 2015 showcases seminal artists’ works.

The India Art Fair (IAF) 2015 features a special section of curated artworks throughout the fair, including site-specific and multimedia installations, interventions and commissioned pieces by some seminal artists from the Asian region and beyond. Art Radar selected 6 works from among the 23 to be showcased.

Francesco Clemente, 'Taking Refuge', 2012-2013, tempera on cotton, embroidery, hand stitching, bamboo poles, wood finials, ropes, iron weights, 600 x 400 x 300 cm. Image courtesy India Art Fair.

Francesco Clemente, ‘Taking Refuge’, 2012-2013, tempera on cotton, embroidery, hand stitching, bamboo poles, wood finials, ropes, iron weights, 600 x 400 x 300 cm. Supported by Volte Art Projects. Image courtesy India Art Fair.

The seventh edition of the India Art Fair (29 January – 1 February 2015) features a rich and diverse range of events and projects throughout its duration. Art Projects (PDF download) is a specially designed and curated programme, spanning indoor and outdoor spaces of the fair, and featuring large-scale and multimedia installations, site-specific sculptures and interventions as well as works specifically commissioned for the event. The Art Projects section includes 23 among the most stimulating and innovative artists working in the Indian art scene and internationally.

Curated by IAF’s Artistic Director Girish Shahane, Art Projects is integrated in conjunction with IAF’s renowned Speakers’ Forum, which brings some of the most influential and high-profile industry speakers to the fair. Shahane’s decision to integrate the two programmes stems from a desire “to maximise the synergy between talks and artworks,” as IAF told Art Radar:

Seeing the artworks will encourage visitors to stay on to hear the artists speak, or make a return visit. Equally, hearing the artists or seeing the programme will encourage visitors to seek out the special projects. Thus, a productive feedback loop will be created between viewing and listening.

Rahul Kumar, ‘Circle uncircled', an installation in ceramic, supported by Gallery Alternatives and India  Foundation for the Arts. Image courtesy India Art Fair.

Rahul Kumar, ‘Circle Uncircled: an installation in ceramic’, supported by Gallery Alternatives and India Foundation for the Arts. Image courtesy India Art Fair.

In addition to the six artworks and artists profiled below, Art Projects will also feature the following:

  • Sanjay Theodore, Artificial Participation, supported by Chatterjee & Lal
  • Chitra Ganesh and Dhruvi Acharya, Untitled, supported by Gallery Espace and Gallery Chemould Prescott Road
  • Faig Ahmed, Shapeless,
 supported by Nature Morte
  • Priyanka Choudhary, The Art of Papilio Demoleus (or how to become The Lemon Butterfly), supported by Gallery Maskara
  • Manuel João Vieira, Counter Plan,
 supported by Perve Galeria
  • Jayashree Chakravarty, Roots, supported by Akar Prakar
  • Nandita Kumar, eMotiVesOuNDs of the eLEctRicwRiTEr, supported by Lakeeren Gallery
  • T.V. Santhosh, The Threshold into a Dream, supported by The Guild
  • Dayanita Singh, Museum of Chance – Book Objects
  • Noni Lazaga, To Dream or Not to Dream, supported by Instituto Cervantes, New Delhi
  • Sudarshan Shetty, I Know Nothing of the End, supported by GallerySKE
  • Hetain Patel, Heaven & Earth, supported by Chatterjee & Lal and Arts Council, England, commissioned by Darbar
  • Smriti Dixit, Memory of Red, supported by Art Musings
  • Daniel Buren, Untitled, supported by Galleria Continua & Institut Français en Inde
  • Daku, Untitled, supported by St. Art
  • Veer Munshi, 
Untitled, supported by Popular Prakashan and Art District XIII
  • Vishal K Dar, PRAJAPATI, supported by vis à vis India Pvt. Ltd
Muhammad Zeeshan, 'On Indefinitness', (2008), installation, gouache on wasli with glass box and ink on water, 70 x 55 cm. Image courtesy India Art Fair.

Muhammad Zeeshan, ‘On Indefiniteness’, 2008, installation, gouache on wasli with glass box and ink on water, 70 x 55 cm. Image courtesy India Art Fair.

Muhammad Zeeshan, On Indefiniteness | supported by Latitude 28

Pakistani neo-miniaturist Muhammad Zeeshan (b. 1980, Mirpurkhas) incorporates the rich miniature tradition with surrealist subjects and dark themes. At IAF, his project On Indefiniteness continues with some of his previous works’ thematic of the brutal reality of art being finite. Some of his previous miniature paintings seem unfinished: a large part of the artwork is laser scored in black outlines, while only a fragment or detail is painted in colour, leaving one wondering what lies beneath the white wasli paper.

On Indefiniteness, through tackling the same theory of the finite nature of art, aims to allow audiences to appreciate the moment here and now and, by extension, to focus on the importance of time. Black ink gradually alters the painting at IAF, changing the perception of the artwork and how it is viewed. Zeeshan says:

While international art fairs aim to promote art and enrich it as an industry, I present not just my work, but its slow and imminent ruin, thereby juxtaposing commoditised markets, collection and subsequent ownership, with the intrinsic value that art truly holds.

Rahul Kumar, ‘Circle uncircled', an installation in ceramic, supported by Gallery Alternatives and India  Foundation for the Arts. Image courtesy India Art Fair.

Rahul Kumar, ‘Circle Uncircled: an installation in ceramic’ (detail), supported by Gallery Alternatives and India Foundation for the Arts. Image courtesy India Art Fair.

Rahul Kumar, Circle Uncircled: an installation in ceramic | supported by Gallery Alternatives and India Foundation for the Arts 

Indian ceramic artist Rahul Kumar’s Circle Uncircled: an installation in ceramic is a “psychedelic constellation” comprising 101 colourful glazed platters of varying sizes. As Kumar told Hindustan Times,

The platters form one united whole when seen in totality, but there is a lot of surface detailing that I have given to each individual platter. Each piece is unique and there is much that goes on at the individual level. The surfaces are also reflective, so depending on the light and shadow, the work speaks to you differently.

Hand-contoured, the discs or plates retain an element of deformity or chance, suggesting “the primacy of the earth and the smell of land and water, and of unrestrained skies.” The arrangement seems random but is actually carefully thought out, and reflects the artist’s interest in the dichotomies inherent in life and the universe – individual and society, the seemingly chaotic nature of the ordered cosmos, the ephemerality of balance and the ever-changing dynamics between objects, things and people.

Francesco Clemente, 'Taking Refuge', 2012-2013, tempera on cotton, embroidery, hand stitching, bamboo poles, wood finials, ropes, iron weights, 600 x 400 x 300 cm. Supported by Volte Arts Project. Image courtesy India Art Fair.

Francesco Clemente, ‘Taking Refuge’, 2012-2013, (interior detail), tempera on cotton, embroidery, hand stitching, bamboo poles, wood finials, ropes, iron weights, 600 x 400 x 300 cm. Supported by Volte Art Projects. Image courtesy India Art Fair.

Francesco Clemente, Taking Refuge | supported by Volte Art Projects 

Francesco Clemente (b. 1952, Naples) is a renowned Italian artist whose artistic practice has entertained a long-standing relationship with India, where he has lived and worked extensively. Much of his work shows influences and inspiration from the Subcontinent, both philosophically and visually.

Taking Refuge (2013) stems from Clemente’s collaboration with tent makers in Jodhpur, and is part of a series of tents that integrate myriad cultural and art historical references, while engaging with the long history of tents as shelters. The dark interior space of the tent at IAF features paintings of Buddhas in blue and grey lining the surface of the tent. Animal heads are painted on the Buddhas, engaging with questions about the cycles of life and death, demise and return. The exterior features the usual fragmented appliqué of Clemente’s tents, with lines of gold embroidery. Upon the surface, the Vajrayana vow of ‘taking refuge’ is printed in expansive blocks of text.

Krystian Truth Czaplicki, 'Untitled (Fungus)', supported by Polish Institute, India. Image courtesy India Art Fair.

Krystian Truth Czaplicki, ‘Untitled (Fungus)’, supported by Polish Institute, India. Image courtesy India Art Fair.

Krystian Truth Czaplicki, Untitled (Fungus) | supported by Polish Institute, India

Polish artist Krystian Truth Czaplicki (b. 1984, Wrocław) is, as he defines himself, “an urban artist”. He says:

I neither like nor use the term street art. […] From my perspective, the beauty of creating in the public space lies in the fact that your works can be very personal, have strong intellectual undercurrents, and yet still look like a natural part of the local environment. Of all the art I encounter on the streets each day, I think I like letter-based graffiti the most.

His work at IAF gained popularity while he was still a student. A “poetic project”, Untitled (Fungus) consists of duplicated forms annexed to urban architecture and has appeared on the streets of Warsaw, London, Manchester, Bordeaux, Rome and Moscow, among others. His visceral creation is viewed in dialectical relationship with Daniel Buren’s minimalist work and will materialise as a site-specific installation on the wall of one of the largest permanent structures in the fair’s premises.

Paresh Maity, 'Procession', motorbike parts, lights and wood, dimensions variable. Supported by Art Alive Gallery. Image courtesy India Art Fair.

Paresh Maity, ‘Procession’, motorbike parts, lights and wood, dimensions variable. Supported by Art Alive Gallery. Image courtesy India Art Fair.

Paresh Maity, Procession | supported by Art Alive Gallery

Indian painter and sculptor Paresh Maity (b. 1965, Tamluk) comes from a land of great tradition in terracotta sculpture, which Maity has reinterpreted in a contemporary way, developing work in a variety of media. Maity often explores the relationship between nature and life through meditative works that evoke the multitude of facets of the universe. His work at IAF, Procession, was previously exhibited at Art Stage Singapore in 2011.

Comprising fifty ants made of discarded motorcycle parts, lights and wood, the installation pays tribute to the resilience and humble achievements of ants. These insects rely on community and their strength lies in their union, reaching “farther and deeper than most other beings”. The large-scale sculptures bring to the fore the “exemplary standards and the undying spirit of these common ants.”

Anoli Perera, 'Second Skin: Elastic Dress II', supported by Shrine Empire. Photo by Aaron Burton. Image courtesy India Art Fair.

Anoli Perera, ‘Second Skin: Elastic Dress II’, supported by Shrine Empire Gallery. Photo by Aaron Burton. Image courtesy India Art Fair.

Anoli Perera, Second Skin: Elastic Dress II | supported by Shrine Empire Gallery

Sri Lankan artist Anoli Perera (b. 1962, Colombo) is a pioneer in her native country for having introduced feminism and craft in art practice. Her work engages with women’s issues, among others, as is evident in her work at IAF. Second Skin: Elastic Dress II is a scarlet installation that represents the changes and fluctuations in the artist’s “state of being”.

Through this, Perera explores the cyclical transformations of her own body that overwhelm her. Impregnated by nature, her body releases “the scarlet fluid” – waters that cleanse the body, preparing it for another cycle of “anticipation and pain”. As a result of the physical changes, the mind also remains in a constant state of fluctuation, never really prepared to embrace the next cyclical change. The “shroud of being” she weaves with elastic bands stands as a monument to “the monumentality of change and its anxieties”.

C. A. Xuan Mai Ardia

618

Related Topics: Indian artists, Pakistani artists, Sri Lankan artists, European artists, installation, site-specific, curatorial practice, art fairs, events in New Delhi

Related Posts:

Subscribe to Art Radar for more on the 2015 edition of art fairs around Asia and beyond

Sara Raza appointed as Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Middle East and North Africa



Sara Raza has been selected to take part in the third curatorial residency of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative. 

During the two-year residency as Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Middle East and North Africa, London-based curator, critic and editor Sara Raza will work on acquiring Middle Eastern and North African artworks to add to the Museum’s permanent collection.

Sara Raza. Image from guggenheim.org.

Sara Raza. Image from guggenheim.org.

The Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Residency

The Guggenheim Foundation announced on 20 January that London-based curator, critic and editor Sara Raza has been selected for the third curatorial residency of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative. During the two-year residency, Raza will take up the role of Middle East and North Africa curator for the Guggenheim’s MAP Initiative. Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, said in the press release: 

[Raza's] work will complement and extend the research that the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi curatorial team is undertaking.

Launched in 2012, the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative is an ambitious multi-year collaborative initiative involving acquisitions, curatorial residencies, international touring exhibitions and diverse online and educational activities. The Initiative focuses on three regions:

  • South and Southeast Asia
  • Latin America
  • Middle East and North Africa.

As the third MAP curator, Raza will work alongside June Yap (South and Southeast Asia curator) and Pablo León de la Barra (Latin America curator) to realise the dynamic programme.

About Sara Raza

Raza is a London-based independent curator, writer, editor and educator who works on projects in the Middle East, Asia and Europe. She is currently the Desk Editor for West and Central Asia at ArtAsiaPacific and Head of Education and Public Programmes and Curator of the upcoming 2015 Public Art Festival, organised by Yarat Contemporary Art Space.

Over the last ten years, Raza’s broad curatorial and programming experience includes serving as Adjunct Associate Curator at the Maraya Art Centre, Head of Curatorial Programs at Alaan Artspace and curator of several independent international exhibitions for biennials and festivals. She was a former curator of public programmes at Tate Modern and a recipient of the 2004 South London Gallery/Arts Council curatorial award.

Raza holds a Masters in Art History and Theory (20th Century) from Goldsmiths College and is currently a PhD candidate researching post-Soviet Orientalism at the Royal College of Art. On top of her curatorial commitments, Raza is currently editing a book entitled Punk Orientalism

Director Richard Armstrong welcomed Raza in the press release: 

With [Raza's] formidable scholarship, critical eye, and broad range of curatorial and programming experience, she will help us further our goal to realise the potential of art to expand people’s horizons everywhere.

Works that address a “crisis in thinking”

During her two-year term as Middle East and North Africa MAP curator, Raza will work with the Guggenheim’s curatorial staff to study and acquire works of art from the Middle East and North Africa. Artworks chosen by her will enter the museum’s permanent collection and form the basis of a Guggenheim exhibition due to open in 2016. The newly acquired works will also subsequently travel to the Middle East and North Africa. 

Raza stated in the press release: 

This MAP curatorship is a wonderful opportunity to explore the depth of contemporary artistic practices emerging from the Middle East and North Africa, and to engage in a dialogue with new audiences. [...] Having witnessed the diverse curatorial trajectories that the MAP initiative has taken thus far, I am looking forward to working with the Guggenheim and UBS to bring this remarkable endeavor to its fruition.

Raza was also quoted by The Art Newspaper as saying that she was

especially interested in the thinking sciences and exploring curatorial ideas pertaining to the origin of meaning, and works that address a crisis in current thinking.

Michele Chan

616

Related Topics: curatorial practice, curators, residencies, museums, art in the Middle East, West Asian artists, African artists

Related Posts:

Subscribe to Art Radar for more news about Asian contemporary art

“Art cannot be taught”: Korean artist and curator Park Chan-Kyong – interview



Artist and curator tells Art Radar about the importance of free will and art in South Korea today.

Park Chan-Kyong talks about the importance of critiquing art trends, finding “Korean-ness”, art education, and curating the 8th SeMA Biennale Mediacity Seoul in 2014.

Park Chan-Kyong, 'Manshin: Ten Thousand Spirits', 2013, film still, HD video, 120 min. Image courtesy the artist.

Park Chan-Kyong, ‘Manshin: Ten Thousand Spirits’, 2013, film still, HD video, 120 min. Image courtesy the artist.

Park Chan-Kyong (b. 1965) has always had a critical outlook on Korea’s contemporary art and also on the subjects he has addressed in his work. Originally trained in painting at Seoul National University, he then went on to study photography at the California Institute of the Arts. In 2004, he was awarded the Hermès Korea Missulsang, one of the most sought-after art awards in Korea. Working in a wide range of media, from video to photography and more, he has won numerous awards internationally.

Park Chan-Kyong in his studio. Image courtesy the author.

Park Chan-Kyong in his studio. Image courtesy the author.

In 2014, Park served as Art Director for the eighth SeMA Biennale Mediacity Seoul. He is best known for his media-based works Sindoan (2008), Radiance (2010), Anyang Paradise City (2011), Night Fishing (2011, co-directed with his brother Park Chan-Wook) and Manshin (2013). In 2015, he has just opened his first ever solo exhibition in London at Iniva (Institute of International Visual Arts) under the title “Pa-yong – Last Sutra Recitation”.

For the artist, it appears that the inner spiritual calling is of great importance. Additionally, addressing subjects face to face is a necessity in his process of developing a personal analysis on social, philosophical and political analyses.

Art Radar visited Park at his studio, where all such endeavours are experimented with before the general audience is able to see the outcome.

Park Chan Kyong, 'Anyang, Paradise City', 2010,film still, HD video, 101 min. Image courtesy the artist.

Park Chan Kyong, ‘Anyang, Paradise City’, 2010, film still, HD video, 101 min. Image courtesy the artist.

The subjects you address in your work are closely related to what has been happening in Korea throughout history, in the modern era and also today. Korea is a complex place in terms of its social issues, psychology and politics. In the past, and even today, how have you arrived at the subject matters that you address?

About ten years before working on the Sindoan project, I happened to visit Gyeryong Mountain located in Chungcheong-nam Province, near the central western part of South Korea. It was winter. Outside, I could see snow covered mountains and the crispy clear full moon in the night sky. The experience was almost a shock to me and even today I remember it vividly. Since then I had always thought of returning to Gyeryong Mountain. In 2004, I was awarded the Hermès Korea Missulsang.

At the time, I thought that my life would transform with the award, but not much changed. I did not even receive any offer to hold a solo exhibition or even to participate in a group show. I was devastated and I was on the verge of a nervous breakdown. On top of that my health was also in a dire state. Spaced out and in a state of numbness, I began dreaming of Gyeryong Mountain. I think it was more like a calling and I felt that I needed to return.

The life of an artist in Korea is not easy. One would think that after having won a major award, there would be an active transition in one’s career, but unfortunately reality was not so generous. Perhaps that is the dark side of Korea’s contemporary art world and society. At the time, I was seriously thinking about changing my profession from being a conceptual artist to a commercial film director, as I needed to make a living. Then I was approached by Kim Sung-Won, curator at the Atelier Hermès, Korea. I was given another opportunity to create something.

So I began my research on Sindoan around 2006, 2007. The location itself is of great importance in Korean history. A round valley under Gyeryong Mountain, it once served as an important historical place: as the capital of the newborn Joseon Dynasty, in favour of the founder Lee Seong-Kye at the end of the fourteenth century – and the name Sindoan (新都內) means ‘new capital city’. It is also known as a sacred place with a strong presence of energy. In the early 1980s, the government declared the establishment of a military headquarter there.

My objective was to study the location and expose its importance as a way of preservation. There are two opposing factors present in this particular site: one being the existence of superstitious forces, and the other, something related to national mysticism. I think of the place as the co-existence of dual utopia, that of reality and social change.

Generally speaking, the traditional culture of religion has been suppressed and collapsed through historical changes – the Joseon Dynasty regime and later on with the Japanese colonisation. Therefore Korea’s inherent folk religions, indigenous beliefs and shamanism disappeared. I realised the importance of acknowledging such traditions and what Sindoan’s site-specific role meant to us as Koreans.

Park Chan-Kyong, 'Sindoan', 2008, production still. Image courtesy the artist.

Park Chan-Kyong, ‘Sindoan’, 2008, production still. Image courtesy the artist.

Last year was a special year for you as you worked as the art director for SeMA Biennale Mediacity Seoul 2014. This event was first founded in 2000 and it has made a mark in the field of media art. The title Ghosts, Spies and Grandmothersimmediately defines your focus. What did you achieve from the experience, and what was it like to work with the Seoul Museum of Art?

I learnt a great deal from being the art director of a major art event. Firstly, I learnt to assess art and artists – in other words, I began to really study each piece to understand what was convincing and what was not. It was a whole new experience for me – perhaps one could say that I was standing on the other side of things. The role of a curator truly requires a person to analyse art by seeing if the concept or subject matter is convincing to the viewer.

I knew from the start what I wanted to do with the event, my focus was clear. I truly enjoyed the experience and I appreciate what Director Kim Hong-Hee at the Seoul Museum of Art has done on my behalf. Her focus is orientated towards preserving the core essence of Korea, whether it be tradition or what is happening today, and I appreciate her endeavours in implementing her philosophy.

For the opening ceremony of SeMA Biennale Mediacity Seoul 2014, you had aptly arranged for the ‘gut’ performance to take place, namely, a shaman performing a particular ritual.

It is the most natural thing to do as a Korean. In the past, many important events were commemorated with this sort of shaman ritual. For the opening, I had specifically invited a shaman who could conduct a ‘Seoul gut’ as such. Even the ritualistic ceremonies differ according to region. Many of the rituals performed in South Korea today have their origin in North Korea.

I am not sure how many people know about the specific ritual performances, but since I have been interested in this subject for so long, I am aware of the differences. It was only natural for me to invite a particular gut with its roots in Seoul as the event took place at the Seoul Museum of Art. Furthermore, last year was a rather tragic year for Korea as we had the Sewol ferry accident, and I also wanted to pay tribute to that tragedy.

Park Chan-Kyong, 'Banpo', 2009, from "Radiance" (2010), digital c-type print, 35 x 70 cm. Image courtesy the artist.

Park Chan-Kyong, ‘Banpo’, 2009, from “Radiance” (2010), digital C-type print, 35 x 70 cm. Image courtesy the artist.

Through this attempt with SeMA Biennale Mediacity Seoul 2014, do you think you have influenced the overall development of contemporary Korean art, particularly in the context of its current flow? What is your opinion on contemporary Korean art today?

I have always been anxious of the fact that too many artists follow the system laid by Western influences. In saying so, evidently in this day and age it is difficult to not be influenced by different cultures, particularly by Western ones. I feel that too many artists simply follow the large pattern rather than questioning it. I have always been quite critical of this and it saddens me to see artists consciously or unconsciously following the system as such.

Taking charge of one’s life, being the owner of it, is important rather than simply following the crowd as it is related to self-esteem. I think it is also related to art education in Korea. In my opinion, art cannot be taught. I never went to school in my college days, and maybe because of that I was able to cultivate a free will. My initiative with SeMA Biennale Mediacity Seoul 2014 is almost an obvious one, subjects that naturally require to be critically addressed.

After having studied painting in Korea, you continued your studies in photography at the California Institute of the Arts. How different was the learning there from when you were in Korea?

The California Institute of the Arts is a good school and the thing I liked most was the opportunity to have in-depth discourses. I really enjoyed those, and I think that art should be encouraged in this way. Today, many young scholars in Korea, lecturers and professors included, are teaching more effectively. Moreover, the lesser known universities seem to teach better than the more established ones as they recruit younger scholars with a more open viewpoint.

Are you interested in taking on another role as art director – perhaps for another major event in contemporary art?

Not for now. I need a rest after last year and I just opened a solo exhibition in London. This year I’m going to focus on research work for my next projects.

Park Chan-Kyong, 'Bongwonsa', 2009, from "Radiance" (2010), digital pigment print, 35 x 52 cm. Image courtesy the artist.

Park Chan-Kyong, ‘Bongwonsa’, 2009, from “Radiance” (2010), digital pigment print, 35 x 52 cm. Image courtesy the artist.

It seems that you are not afraid to cross over genres and experiment with a wide range of materials. How do you see such approaches in the future?

Until now, it is quite true to state that I have been quite versatile with my use of media and my method of approach. As time passes, I begin to feel that it is important to discipline oneself to perhaps remain true to roots and authenticity, both in expression and medium.

My future research will focus in this direction. By crossing over genres I have discovered that sometimes seriousness in the trait and genre can be lacking.

How do you see your work developing in the future? How do you hope to contribute to the development of contemporary Korean art?

I have two major projects in mind and they are already being initiated to some extent. One is a solo exhibition due to take place in 2016, and this will be in a leading contemporary art museum in Seoul, Korea. The other is a commercial-based film in the horror genre. I will be working together with my brother Park Chan-Wook. He has always been supportive of what I do and we will be working together on this project.

The horror film genre has a specific legitimacy and, as mentioned above, I would like to focus on working in a single genre, hence the reason for making a horror film. Furthermore, there is an audience for this particular genre in Korea. Lastly, my objective is social criticism through what I make, similar to what I have done in the past.

My interest currently is on Pan-Asianism – also known as Asianism or Greater Asianism – and I am researching the Pacific War and the Japanese philosophical movement centred at Kyoto University.

Hyeyoung Cho

615

Related Topics: art education, Korean artists, interviews, artists as curators, events in Seoul

Related Posts:

Subscribe to Art Radar for more interviews with Korean curators

Delhi gears up for the India Art Fair 2015: What to see, where to be



Art Radar handpicks 5 events from the collateral events calendar of the India Art Fair 2015.

Art lovers are treated to an exciting collateral events calendar as Delhi gears up for the India Art Fair 2015. Art Radar picks 5 must-go events that should not be missed.

Achia Anzi, 'Barakhamba', cement pipes, dimensions variable. Image courtesy the artist and Gallery Threshold.

Achia Anzi, ‘Barakhamba’, cement pipes, dimensions variable. Image courtesy the artist and Gallery Threshold.

“The Land of Nod”: Achia Anzi at Gallery Threshold 

Achia Anzi (b. 1979, Israel) is a Delhi-based Israeli professor and artist who has been living in India for the last ten years. An artist in exile, Anzi’s poetic sculptures and installations uniquely deal with Israel’s spiritual crisis – in addition to the political and the social – as well as his own.

While the artist is well-known for his use of coarse raw materials such as iron, plaster, tin sheets and scrap to create stunning works with a rustic feel, “The Land of Nod” sees the artist exploring new media such as video, multimedia installations and digital and electronic works to complement his signature nostalgic materials. According to the press release, Anzi’s new exhibition “explores the experience of migration and its impact on the perception of time and space”.

“The Land of Nod” runs until 24 February 2015 at Gallery Threshold, C-221 Sarvodaya Enclave, New Delhi 110017.

Dayanita Singh, 'Untitled 5'. Image courtesy the artist.

Dayanita Singh, ‘Untitled 5′. Image courtesy the artist.

“Dayanita Singh: Book Works”: Dayanita Singh at the Goethe-Institut New Delhi 

Dayanita Singh (b. 1961, New Delhi) describes herself as a bookmaker working with photography. The artist’s one-of-a-kind project Museum of Chance (2014) is a book that, in her own words, “push[es] the limits of what people might consider a book” – because it is simultaneously an exhibition, an art object and a catalogue. From its ability to be exhibited to the flexibility for images to be re-sequenced and re-connected in different ways, Singh’s thoughtful project profoundly re-thinks the concept of the book and enables it to become a work of art in its own right. According to Singh’s websiteMuseum of Chance is “a book about how life unfolds, and asks to be recorded and edited, along and off the axis of time.”

“Dayanita Singh: Book Works” runs until 14 February 2015 at the Goethe-Institut, 3 Kasturba Gandhi Marg, New Delhi 110001.

Homai Vyarawalla, 'A Trainee Nurse', early 1940s, digital reprint from original negative (medium format). Image courtesy  HV Archive/The Alkazi Collection of Photography.

Homai Vyarawalla, ‘A Trainee Nurse’, early 1940s digital reprint from original negative (medium format). Image courtesy HV Archive/The Alkazi Collection of Photography.

“Inner and Outer Lives: The Many Worlds of Homai Vyarawalla”: Homai Vyarawalla at Shridharani Gallery

Homai Vyarawalla (1913-2012) is widely considered India’s first woman press photographer or photojournalist. Over the span of her career, Vyarawalla photographed numerous important political and national leaders, and many of her images later became iconic.

“Inner and Outer Lives: The Many Worlds of Homai Vyarawalla” (2015) shifts the focus towards some of the photographer’s lesser known subjects. Returning to previously overlooked images from the photojournalist’s archive, the exhibition features intimate photographs that focus on women and their “intersections with space, institutional life and the urban everyday in Mumbai and Delhi”. According to the press release, Vyarawalla’s portraits

bear testimony to how modernity was being defined for the young collegiate woman in India [...] reveal young men and women who had to be both conformist as well as transgressive as they negotiated a fine balance between their inner and outer lives.

“Inner and Outer Lives: The Many Worlds of Homai Vyarawalla” runs until 24 February 2015 at Shridharani Gallery, Triveni Kala Sangam, 205 Tansen Marg, New Delhi.

Kazuko Miyamoto, 'Target Kimono', 2005. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation New Delhi.

Kazuko Miyamoto, ‘Target Kimono’, 2005. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation New Delhi.

“Bodily Tactics”: Kazuko Miyamoto at The Japan Foundation New Delhi 

Lovers of Japanese art and conceptual art should not miss this illuminating retrospective of the little-known yet quietly influential artist Kazuko Miyamoto (b. 1942, Tokyo), former assistant and lifelong creative partner of American conceptual artist Sol LeWitt. The exhibition takes on a unique angle to analyse the role of the female body in Miyamoto’s practice. The press release states:

From the early minimalist-oriented works of the late 60s and 70s to the photographic works of the 80s and 90s; from the sculptures and installations to the various performative activities [...] the female and erotic body recurs as a form of resistance and opposition, as a critical tool to scrutinise social and aesthetic conventions.

“Bodily Tactics” runs until 28 February 2015 at The Japan Foundation, 5A Ring Road, Lajpat Nagar 4, New Delhi 110024. 

Kamar Alam, 'Untitled', 50 x 50 inches. Image courtesy the artist and TAD Arts Gallery.

Kamar Alam, ‘Untitled’, 50 x 50 inches. Image courtesy the artist and TAD Arts Gallery.

“Collectors Corner 2015″: Various artists at Visual Arts Gallery, India Habitat Center 

Last on the list is a special exhibition hosted by TAD Arts Gallery entitled “Collectors Corner 2015″, to be held at the India Habitat Center. Featuring a selection of artists, the show specifically targets the “art collector” and emphasises commercial value and potential growth. Participating artists include Kamar Alam, Suchit Sahni, Farhad Hussain, Seema Kohli, Rajan Krishnan, Kazi Nasir, Rajiv Puri, Shubhra Das and Amar Sultan. The press release states that the cohort includes

new voices that hold definite, measurable promise and senior artists who have carved their own niche in the art market.

“Collectors Corner 2015″ will be held on 30-31 January and 1-2 February 2015 at the Visual Arts Gallery at the India Habitat Center, Lodhi Road, New Delhi 110003.

Michele Chan

620

Related Topics: Indian artists, Israeli artists, Japanese artists, sculpture, installations, photography, events in New Delhi

Related Posts:

Subscribe to Art Radar for more contemporary art from India

Art Radar seeks part-time (paid) Intern



Administrative and Social Media Intern – Contemporary art publishing

Art Radar, one of the leading online platforms covering contemporary art news and trends in Asia and beyond, is seeking a paid Intern to work on ongoing administrative and social media tasks.

There may be an opportunity for career progression at the end of 6 months for the right candidate. Previous Interns have gone on to take up writing and managerial positions within Art Radar.

Description

The Art Radar Intern will ideally be a Journalism or Arts graduate with an understanding of online publishing, social media, and a passion for contemporary Asian art. Reporting to the Editor, the Intern will be responsible for:

  • Editorial assistance: updating our curated listings of employment opportunities and art events. The Opportunities page is updated weekly and each week we publish a new article listing the latest opportunities and those that are about to expire. You will need to source new opportunities online, update the page, create new pages for new opportunities, and create a weekly post to advertise new opportunities. The Events page is updated every fortnight.
  • Social media and outreach: researching, creating, testing and maintaining new platforms and strategies, supervised by the Editor. A candidate with prior experience in social media marketing and/or a strong social media presence is desirable.
  • General administrative and editorial tasks as necessary. These may include assisting with Art Radar’s ongoing projects or copy editing articles for the weekly newsletter. Tasks will be agreed upon mutually by Art Radar and the Intern.

Requirements

For this position, you must

  • have a background in art history, contemporary art, the art market or a related field (desirable but not essential)
  • have native-level English language ability, written and spoken
  • be familiar with SEO and SMO strategies
  • be familiar with social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest and LinkedIn
  • be able to quickly find information using on- and off-line research methods
  • be familiar with the WordPress platform
  • have reliable access to the internet and your own computer
  • be willing to commit to regular hours each week

This role will be for an initial period of 6 months, and will entail 8-10 hours a week (estimate) once the Intern is fully trained. However, for the right candidate this role may expand to include further, undecided tasks, so a candidate with the ability to take on more work/hours is strongly desired and will be given preference.

Remuneration

The Intern will be paid a base rate of USD100 per month.

How to apply

To apply for this position, please email your resume and a cover letter to artradarrecruitment@gmail.com.

Application deadline: 10 February 2015

Shortlisted applicants will be contacted by email and may be required to attend an interview over Skype. Only shortlisted and successful applicants will be contacted.

Please direct questions about this position to artradarrecruitment@gmail.com.

Art Radar operates a remote office only with an internationally based staff.

Days of work per week are to be decided during the recruitment process.