10 indian artists to watch in 6 minutes

ART VIDEO CONTEMPORARY INDIAN ARTISTS

In this TED video, collector Ravin Agrawal introduces ten young contemporary artists working in India, and he does it in six minutes! Art Radar presents a brief summary of the video and the artists that it covers.

Click here to watch the video on the TED website.

Bharti Kher examines the religious and cultural role of the bindi in Indian society and then attempts to “liberate this everyday cliché… by exploding it into something spectacular.”

A. Balasubramaniam has produced works in sculpture, painting and installation and is known for “working wonders with fiberglass.”

Chitra Ganesh reinterprets the Indian comic books Amar Chitra Katha, exposing the sexual and gender politics embedded within.

Jitish Kallat is “heavily influenced by graffiti and street art”. His work “captures that sense of density and energy which really characterises modern urban Bombay.”

N. S. Harsha creates “fine, delicate images which he then repeats on a massive scale.” One of his works, Nations, features 192 functioning sewing machines, fabricating the flags of every nation of the United Nations.

Dhruvi Acharya, like Chitra Ganesh, mines the rich source material of the Amar Chitra Katha, however in her work she strips away the images, leaving the text in place and unmasking a “previously unseen” and “provocative” message.

Raqib Shaw is also “reinventing the miniature tradition.” The “rich, detailed effect” in his works comes from the application of metallic industrial paints using porcupine quills.

The Raqs Media Collective, a group of three artists, are described as “the foremost practitioners of multimedia art in India today.” Raqs explore themes of globalisation and urbanisation in their work.

Subodh Gupta, “probably the alpha-male of Indian contemporary art,” uses everyday objects in his works, especially “stainless steel kitchen vessels and tiffin containers.” He has incorporated these objects “into ever more colossal sculptures and installations.”

Ranjani Shettar works and lives in the state of Karnataka. Shettar creates “ethereal sculptures and installations that … marry the organic to the industrial and bring … the local global.”

HH/KN

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