Para/Site bring Indonesian moving image to Hong Kong – Record Waves exhibition

CONTEMPORARY VIDEO ART INDONESIA

“Recorded Waves: Moving Images from Indonesia” began at Para/Site Art Space in Hong Kong in November this year. Curated by Para/Site’s Executive Director and Curator Alvaro Rodríguez Fominaya, the exhibition displays an assemblage of examples of the development of video art in Indonesia. It is presented simultaneously with “Jompet.Third Realm”, a solo exhibition of work by celebrated Indonesian artist Kuswidananto aka Jompet.

To find out more about “Recorded Waves: Moving Images from Indonesia” and “Jompet.Third Realm” visit the Para/Site Art Space website.

The selection of works for “Recorded Waves” was based on curatorial research done by Katerina Valdivia Bruch who received a grant from the Goethe Institute. Bruch also collaborated with Ruang Rupa, an artist initiative that this year celebrates its ten-year anniversary and which organises an internationally acclaimed video art festival called OK. Video – Jakarta International Video Festival, which has taken place biannually in Jakarta since 2003.

The exhibition features works from pioneer video artist Krisna Murti, as well as emerging and established artists Tiong Ang, Muhammad Akbar, Henry Foundation, Nala Atmowiloto, Wimo Ambala Bayang, Ari Satria Darma, Eko Nugroho, Anggun Priambodo, Prilla Tania, Wok The Rock and Tintin Wulia.

Art Radar takes a closer look at several of the artists and their works as shown in the exhibition:

Eko Nugroho, 'Bercerobong (Like a Chimney)', 2002, 5'11''. Image courtesy of the artist.

Eko Nugroho, 'Bercerobong (Like a Chimney)', 2002, 5'11''. Image courtesy of the artist.

Eko Nugroho (b.1977, Indonesia)

Bercerobong (Like a Chimney) animates the change of political agenda that took place in Indonesia after the downfall of the Suharto regime.

Wimo Ambala Bayang, 'Once upon a Time in China', 2005, 04'12". Image courtesy of the artist.

Wimo Ambala Bayang, 'Once upon a Time in China', 2005, 04'12". Image courtesy of the artist.

Wimo Ambala Bayang (b.1976, Indonesia)

Once upon a Time in China was made during a residency period in Kunming, China. It presents a fictional story about a person who falls from the sky, takes a walk around here on earth and finally heads back to the sky. In this video, the artist spits in all public garbage bins he finds along the walk.

Prilla Tania, 'Clean Up', 2007, 2'13''. Image courtesy of the artist.

Prilla Tania, 'Clean Up', 2007, 2'13''. Image courtesy of the artist.

Prilla Tania (b.1977, Indonesia)

This Bandung-based artist presents Clean Up, a video visualizing a metaphorical world where human beings can choose what they want to forget. They have the ability to “clean” their minds of things they consider unnecessary.

Tintin Wulia, 'Everything's OK', 2003, 5'10". Image courtesy of exhibition organiser.

Tintin Wulia, 'Everything's OK', 2003, 5'10". Image courtesy of exhibition organiser.

Tintin Wulia (b.1972, Indonesia)

In Everything’s OK, Wulia uses small polystyrene houses to symbolise the city of Jakarta. The city is presented as a result of uncontrolled growth due to lack of city planning. The city planning fails to recognise human aspects that are basically the soul of a city. Wulia lives and works in Melbourne, Australia.

Ari Satria Darma, 'IQRA', 2005, video still image, 2'14''. Image courtesy of the artist.

Ari Satria Darma, 'IQRA', 2005, video still image, 2'14''. Image courtesy of the artist.

Ari Satria Darma (b.1978, Indonesia)

Darma presents IQRA, an Arabic word which literally means “read.” Through the video he questions the role of text in the visual world. What would happen if the letters forming words and sentences slowly disappeared or were deleted leaving blank spaces? Is it because we live in a consumer society that we would consider the gap left to be an empty spot?

MS/KN/HH

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