Archimuse immersive art history lessons for kids: Dress up included

ART EDUCATION COURSES ART HISTORY

The newly established French company Archimuse educates today’s tech-dependent children and young audiences in immersive art history lessons through imagination and play. Art Radar brings you a look at Archimuse and some other some other organisations that are providing new, interactive ways to bring art education to children.

Click here to find out more about Archimuse’s immersive art history lessons at Springwise.

Image from archimuse.fr.

Creative agency Archimuse has developed a unique multidisciplinary approach awarding children a chance to discover the art of Klimt, Vermeer and Renoir, offering exploration and creative opportunities in short one hour sessions. The workshops additionally cover sculpture and contemporary Op art, looking at artists like the Hungarian painter Vasarely.

The lessons, aimed at five to eleven-year-olds, incorporate animation and encourage active participation. Through games in which listening to music, mime and words are incorporated, children analyse and deconstruct specific works of art. Individuals are given a specialised book to read from, which, as Archimuse describes, offers a sensitive and practical approach to art history.

Archimuse bringing the past to life

Image from archimuse.fr.

Image from archimuse.fr.

Through animations, children are immersed in the world of the painter, better understanding the historical context and drawing attention to the key points of an artist’s style and work. There is opportunity to dress up, create tableaux and musical plays in which the children take on key figures of the artist’s life. In one session offered by Archimuse, children are encouraged to take an imaginary journey to Delft in the seventeenth century and dress up in appropriate costumes.

The company reports that “more than 3,000 children have already benefited from the lessons, which are available for use within schools.” Archimuse mediators work across France in libraries and at exhibitions, fairs and cultural events.

Art museums websites go to for art history learning online

While Archimuse offers a “real world” option for bringing art historical education to children, there seems to be an increasing number of companies and organisations moving into this field online.

The MET Museum website's Explore section offers educational opportunities for young and old. Image from metmuseum.org.

The Explore section of the Metropolitan Museum of Art's website offers educational opportunities for young and old. Image from metmuseum.org.

One website that stands out as a useful art historical educational resource is Garden of Praise which has an extensive list of key twentieth century artists and Renaissance masters. It gives a succinct biography for each artist and a slideshow of the artist’s artworks, and also includes online puzzles, crosswords and colouring activities. KinderArt also has an array of quality art history lessons and other art projects.

The most popular tried and tested art history sites for children are the websites of major art museums. The Metroplitan Museum of Art’s Explore and Learn section has biographical materials on a selection of artists as well as general information about their work. It features short educational videos; one video, for example, consists of dancers that posed for Edgar Degas describing his artworks. In the Asian region, the National Art Gallery, Singapore, has dedicated space on its website to art education, making biographical information on Southeast Asian master artists available on their homepage while buried a little deeper are two educationally-themed games.

What do you do to engage your child or the children in your life with art history? Share your thoughts by leaving a comment below.

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Related Topics: resourcesart and the Internet, promoting art

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