South Asian artists: 4 top posts from 2009 to 2011

SOUTH ASIAN ARTISTS LISTS

Looking for new flavours in South Asian contemporary art? Lately, we have been rummaging around in our archives to bring you the best posts on a given Art Radar topic. A semi-regular series, this week we link to top posts under the topic ‘South Asian artists’.

Bani Abidi, 'Distance From Here' (video still).

Bani Abidi, 'Distance From Here' (video still). 2010.

Sri Lankan art on map with Pala Pothupitiye’s 2010 Sovereign Asian Art Prize win

March 2011

Weaving narrative through a simple map allows Sri Lankan artist Pala Pothupitiye to successfully convey a compelling portrait of human tragedy in the erstwhile war-savaged region of Jaffna.

“The repeated images of the ‘lion’, the central image of the Sri Lankan national flag, makes the background of Pothupitiye’s recent series, “My ID”. “This motif also appears in the background of the state issued national identity cards,” says Sri Lankan artist-cum-curator Anoli Perera.

“By appropriating this motif and using it in his work Pothupitiye ironically and purposefully turns his personal identity into a national issue aligning the personal and the national on a horizontal grid,” she adds.

“This can explore many layers of meaning and interpretations in a context of check points, ethnic marginalisation, exclusivist nationalisms and politics of global mobility while still privileging the artist’s anxieties of his own identity negotiated within his ancestry, family history and the workings of his art practice.”

Click here to read the full post on 2010’s Sovereign Asian Art Prize winner, Sri Lankan artist Pala Pothupitiye.

Pala Pothupitiye, 'Jaffna Map', pen and pencil on printed map, 92 x 66 cm. Image courtesy Sovereign Art Foundation.

Pala Pothupitiye, 'Jaffna Map', pen and pencil on printed map, 92 x 66 cm. Image courtesy Sovereign Art Foundation.

South Asian contemporary art scene: Five artists to watch

January 2011

The post introduces our readers to two new names in South Asian art: Bani Abidi and Prashant Pandey.

Pakistani artist Bani Abidi’s video still image, Distance from Here, portrays her narratives on memory, displacement and migration. Indian artist Prashant Pandey’s use of unconventional mediums like blood on microscope slides, formaldehyde and cobwebs, though not easy on the senses, creates a prismatic definition of new media art.

“My artwork is an end result of a lot of searching from within and what I find around me. I generally work on … contemporary themes and on memories, life and death in a conceptual way,” says Pandey in an artist statement. “I go beyond the conventional boundaries of sculpting and am experimenting [with] new materials so that I can find the art I want.”

Click here to read the full post on South Asia’s five artists to watch.

Prashant Pandey, 'Untitled', 2010, expired chocolate and stainless steel, 24 x 12 x 12 inches. Image courtesy of Gallery Maskara.

Prashant Pandey, 'Untitled', 2010, expired chocolate and stainless steel, 24 x 12 x 12 inches. Image courtesy of Gallery Maskara.

Pakistani American artist Shahzia Sikander impresses judges of SCMP|ART FUTURES at ART HK 10

June 2010

Presenting a mosaic of rich traditions, the dynamic interplay between the traditional style of miniature painting and contemporary form speak volumes of this Pakistan-American artist’s myriad multicultural influences and innovative ideas. Shazia Sikander works with graphite, ink, and gouache on paper.

Click here to read the full post on Pakistani-American artist Shazia Sikander.

Shazia Sikander, 'I am also not my own enemy', 2009, gouache, handpainting, goldleaf and silk screened pigment on paper.

Shazia Sikander, 'I am also not my own enemy', 2009, gouache, handpainting, goldleaf and silk screened pigment on paper.

Middle Eastern, Indian, Pakistani artists show seminal works in 3-city exhibition: Lines of Control

February 2009

Pakistani artist Farida Batool’s “uninhibited” lenticular prints are bound to catch your  attention. Her work, entitled Lines of Control, takes an unusual approach and shows naked male and female bodies as a metaphor for the line of control that marks the  border between India and Pakistan.

The image takes you back to the partition days in 1947 when a nation was carved into two different countries. Bloodlines, a collaboration between Indian artist Nalini Malani and Pakistani-born Iftikhar Dadi, is one of the first collaborative efforts between artists from both countries.

Click here to read the full post on the three-city exhibition “Lines of Control”.

Indian artist Nalini Malani and Pakistani artist Iftikhar Dadi, 'BloodLines' (collaborative work), 2008, embroidery.

Indian artist Nalini Malani and Pakistani artist Iftikhar Dadi, 'BloodLines' (collaborative work), 2008, embroidery.

Want to have a browse through our archives yourself? Click here to take a look at what we have written on South Asian artists and click here to view our entire Topics list.

DP/KN/HH

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