4 emerging Hong Kong artists naturals at portraying nature

HONG KONG ARTISTS GALLERY EXHIBITION

Four young contemporary artists, Nimchi Yuen, Silvia Chan, Flora Fok and Jessica Cheung, are featured in a September 2011 group show at Karin Weber Gallery in Hong Kong. The works on display incorporate oil on canvas, mixed media and sculpture.

Silvia Chan, 'The Stolen Spoondrift (3.1)', 2011, acrylic, seawater, mixed media, 15 x 21 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Silvia Chan, 'The Stolen Spoondrift (3.1)', 2011, acrylic, seawater, mixed media, 15 x 21 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

In the show, entitled “There are no accidents without intention (in life as in art)”, that runs from 9 to 24 September 2011, the exhibiting artists attempt to establish a dialogue with nature and present their interpretations of it.

Click here to visit the Karin Weber Gallery website.

Portrayal of nature comes naturally

Nimchi Yuen

Nimchi Yuen was born in Hong Kong, has lived in the Netherlands and attended university in England. Work by this award winning artist has been widely exhibited in Hong Kong, Singapore, London, New York and Paris.

A concurrence of conflicting elements is a notable feature of her work. “I am exploring the representational without the literal translation of the representational in an arbitrary accidental manner,” she explains.

Many of her works are inspired by nature, her latest series explores birds and landscapes, and she says that her technique is influenced by traditional Chinese painting. “My background is from mixed cultures, which I take references from and use in a distorted manner to dramatise execution,” she explains.

Click here to visit the website of Hong Kong artist Nimchi Yuen.

Nimchi Yuen, 'Pigeons In The Sky', 2011, oil on canvas, 100 x 76 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Nimchi Yuen, 'Pigeons In The Sky', 2011, oil on canvas, 100 x 76 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Nimchi Yuen, 'Five Magpies', 2011, oil on canvas, 76 x 100 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Nimchi Yuen, 'Five Magpies', 2011, oil on canvas, 76 x 100 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Silvia Chan

Silvia Chan combines acrylic paint, seawater and mixed media in the dreamlike narratives that make up her series, “The Stolen Spoondrift”. Through her work, she displays a love for the ocean, philosophically stating that “if and only if [the] ocean is the mother of all [things], artists shall be the children of Mother Nature.”

Silvia Chan, 'The Stolen Spoondrift (5.2)', 2011, acrylic, seawater, mixed media, 21 x 15 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Silvia Chan, 'The Stolen Spoondrift (5.2)', 2011, acrylic, seawater, mixed media, 21 x 15 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Silvia Chan, 'The Stolen Spoondrift (2.1)', 2011, acrylic, seawater, mixed media, 15 x 21 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Silvia Chan, 'The Stolen Spoondrift (2.1)', 2011, acrylic, seawater, mixed media, 15 x 21 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

With a strong sense of colour and movement, the artist follows an innovative method of dripping paint onto cardboard paper, which is then washed over by ocean waves, resulting in a medley of colour combinations. The artist says of her work, “painting can be created by the power of nature, not only by human hands. It can appear in any place. It can be constructed by time and created by any condition of colours and form, such as a sea wave leaving marks along the coast or raindrops leaving marks on windows or walls.”

Watch the video below to learn more about Silvia Chan’s unique painting process:



Born in Hong Kong, Chan holds a Master of education in visual art from the Hong Kong Institute of Education. She currently works as a teacher and has exhibited widely in the city in group and solo exhibitions.

Click here to visit the website of Hong Kong artist Silvia Chan.

Flora Fok

Flora Fok uses the human form to express feelings that she feels are impossible to articulate verbally or through writing. To her, clay is a source of endless fascination and wonder, and she treats it as an artist would a canvas. But there is more to Fok than her adventures in ceramics; she is a painter, too, with a penchant for thick brush strokes.

Providing some insight into her method, she says her sculptural figures are left deliberately hollow in an effort to capture the invisible aspects to life that she believes exist behind the physical world. After graduating from the Fine Art Department of the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2010, Fok set up her home studio in Hong Kong and continues to work from there.

Click here to visit the website of Hong Kong artist Flora Fok.

Flora Fok, 'The Missing Part', 2011, ceramics, 65 x 30 x 30 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Flora Fok, 'The Missing Part', 2011, ceramics, 65 x 30 x 30 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Flora Fok, 'Fly With You', 2011, ceramics, 65 x 30 x 30 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Flora Fok, 'Fly With You', 2011, ceramics, 65 x 30 x 30 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Flora Fok, 'Adhesion', 2011, ceramics, 55 x 30 x 15 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Flora Fok, 'Adhesion', 2011, ceramics, 55 x 30 x 15 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Jessica Cheung

Jessica Cheung was born in Hong Kong but grew up in the US, and she holds an MFA from New York Studio School. Cheung’s subtle use of oils and textures describes a mood of nostalgia in all of her artworks. “Memory plays an important role in my work,” she notes.

The process of revisiting memories from the past allows her to make unexpected discoveries about herself and her art. “I maintain an open-ended, experiential studio practice,” Cheung explains. “Using the still-life genre as a catalyst, I search for the real, a true experience.”

Click here to visit the website of Hong Kong artist Jessica Cheung.

Jessica Cheung, 'Jewellery Garden1', 2010, oil on canvas, 114 x 137 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Jessica Cheung, 'Jewellery Garden1', 2010, oil on canvas, 114 x 137 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Jessica Cheung, 'Jewellery Garden 2', 2010, oil on canvas, 163 x 163 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Jessica Cheung, 'Jewellery Garden 2', 2010, oil on canvas, 163 x 163 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Jessica Cheung, 'Cold Spring', 2011, oil on canvas, 305 x 356 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

Jessica Cheung, 'Cold Spring', 2011, oil on canvas, 305 x 356 cm. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery.

About Karin Weber Gallery

Karin Weber Gallery was founded in 1995 by German-born Karin Weber, who worked for more than fifteen years in the antique and art business in London. The gallery curates and introduces the work of emerging and established artists from Asia and the West. The group exhibition, “There are no accidents without intention (in life as in art)”, finishes on 24 September 2011.

DP/KN/HH

Related Topics: Hong Kong artists, picture posts, artist profiles

Related Posts:

Subscribe to Art Radar for more information on emerging Hong Kong artists


Comments

4 emerging Hong Kong artists naturals at portraying nature — 4 Comments

  1. Hi Silvia,

    Love your natural stroke. It feels good looking at it. Keep it up.

    John

  2. Thank you, Agnes, for your comment. We’re glad you enjoyed the post!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.