Explore contemporary ink art: 5 top Art Radar posts

CONTEMPORARY CHINESE ART PAINTING

In this addition to our “Lists” series, Art Radar looks back at five of our top posts on the topic of contemporary ink art. What is the future of the art form? Is ink art a medium reserved exclusively for Chinese artists? Read the posts below to find out.

Ma Yuan, 'Renyu Huoguo', 2010. Image courtesy Shenzhen Fine Art Institute.

Ma Yuan, 'Renyu Huoguo', 2010. Image courtesy Shenzhen Fine Art Institute.

What is the future of contemporary ink painting? Asia Society panel discussion

July 2011

A discussion on contemporary ink art, held at agnès b. CINEMA, a part of the Hong Kong Arts Centre, brought up a number of key issues on the future of the art form: how it should be understood and appreciated, displayed and passed on to future generations. While there are no simple answers to the questions posed, in the end the panel and audience members both showed optimism about ink art, as it continues to be practised, discussed and appreciated internationally. For readers who are new to the medium, the first section of this post provides a great introduction to the historical development of contemporary ink and a comparison of situations in Hong Kong and on the mainland.

Click here to read the full post on the future of contemporary ink art.

The press release for The Future of Contemporary Ink Painting, a panel discussion organised by the Asia Society in July 2011.

The press release for The Future of Contemporary Ink Painting, a panel discussion organised by the Asia Society in July 2011.

International contemporary ink artists show with Chinese in Shenzhen

February 2011

This post provides an overview and a review of the 7th International Ink Painting Biennale of Shenzhen, held in early 2011. Perceived as the “World’s Expo” of ink art, the event showcased a variety of ink painting styles, from experimental works to traditional masterpieces. The post reveals how the Biennale challenged the notion that ink is exclusive to China, stating that it is practised by international artists and appreciated by global audiences. Barbara Pollack is quoted at the end of this piece; she casts doubt on the market’s response to contemporary ink art when compared with its reaction to traditional works.

Click here to read the full post on the world’s only biennale dedicated to contemporary ink painting.

Jin Weihong, 'Shinei', 2008. Image courtesy Shenzhen Fine Art Institute.

Jin Weihong, 'Shinei', 2008. Image courtesy Shenzhen Fine Art Institute.

How is Chinese ink painting explored in contemporary art? RedBox Review in discussion with Liang Quan

October 2010

This post, the content of which was taken from an article on Chinese art website RedBox Review, summarises a recorded conversation with contemporary ink artist Liang Quan. Liang, now working and living in Shenzhen, is considered to be one of the pioneers of this art form. Abandoning the traditional brushwork of Chinese ink painting, Liang has created Chinese landscapes using a collage of paper soaked in ink and tea. Though the artist’s experimental works seem abstract at first glance, in reality, he follows the traditional aesthetic of multiple points of perspective.

Click here to read the full post on the ink art of Chinese contemporary artist Liang Quan.

Liang Quan, 'Tea Stain No. 3', 2008, ink and paper, 63.8 x 48 cm.

Liang Quan, 'Tea Stain No. 3', 2008, ink and paper, 63.8 x 48 cm.

Wilson Shieh revitalises ancient Chinese painting techniques – video

September 2011

Trained in traditional Chinese painting, Wilson Shieh is one of the few full-time artists in Hong Kong. His popularity in the art world points to the fact that collectors and viewers are starting to take more of an interest in ink art which depicts contemporary issues. In this video, originally posted on Internet channel ChooChooTV’s [art]attack, Shieh explains how his unique style developed. Using the technique of classical fine line (gong-bi), he successfully explores the subject of identity and sexuality through the depiction of figures in tailor-made costumes.

Click here to read the full post on the way in which Hong Kong artist Wilson Shieh combines contemporary ink traditions into his art.

Wilson Shieh 石家豪, 'Mary the Princess (瑪麗公主)', 2008, acrylic on canvas, 145 x 90 cm.

Wilson Shieh 石家豪, 'Mary the Princess (瑪麗公主)', 2008, acrylic on canvas, 145 x 90 cm.

Do you want to have a browse through our archives? Click here to take a look at what else we have written on contemporary ink art.

KN/HH

Related Topics: ink art, painting, Chinese and Hong Kong artists, biennales, lectures and talks

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