Video Art: Newfangled or here to stay? 6 must-read Art Radar posts

NEW MEDIA ASIAN CONTEMPORARY ART

Though video art has been a cultural staple since the 1960s, it has proven especially popular with young and mid-career Asian artists. As part of our “lists” series, we’ve collected six of our best articles on Asian video art and what it means for art enthusiasts.

Stripping ‘Ophelia’ and more: 3 young Taiwanese new media artists in Hong Kong 

April 2012

Chang Li-Ren, 'Ophelia Stripping Classical Skin Flick – Millais’s Wet Ophelia', 2011, Photo #2 of Computer Animation, in "Made in Taiwan", at Input/Output (I/O), Hong Kong. Image courtesy of Input/Output.

Chang Li-Ren, 'Ophelia Stripping Classical Skin Flick – Millais’s Wet Ophelia', 2011, Photo #2 of Computer Animation, in "Made in Taiwan", at Input/Output (I/O), Hong Kong. Image courtesy Input/Output.

This post provides a glimpse into fresh new media art in Asia. It showcases the works of eighties-born Taiwanese artists, video artists Lin Guan-Ming and Yao Chung-Han along with light and sound artist Chang Li-Ren, in the exhibition, “Made in Taiwan”, held at Hong Kong-based gallery Input/Output (I/O). Through the post, readers can access the artists’ portfolios, as well as an interview with I/O gallery on its dedication to promoting new media art in Asia.

Click here to read the full post on new media art exhibition, “Made in Taiwan”.

Video artist eats like Andy Warhol, wins 2nd Bandung Contemporary Art Awards

April 2012

Image of Yusuf Ismail, 'Eat Like Andy', 2011, video.

Presenting the top works at the second annual Bandung Contemporary Art Awards (BaCAA), this post highlights emerging contemporary Southeast Asian art. The first prize winner is Yusuf Ismail with his video installation Eat Like Andy. For the piece, the artist recreates the 1981 footage of Andy Warhol eating a hamburger, placing the new and “original” videos side by side. Through reading this article, readers can find out more about this significant new award and its efforts to develop Indonesian art.

Click here to read the full post on the 2nd Bandung Contemporary Art Awards.

Yang Fudong’s video installations a contemporary form of Chinese hand scrolls 

December 2011

Yang Fudong, 'The Fifth Night', 2010, HD video installation, 7 screens, B&W, sound, 10 min. Image courtesy Spring Workshop.

Yang Fudong, 'The Fifth Night', 2010, HD video installation, 7 screens, B&W, sound, 10 min. Image courtesy Spring Workshop.

This post attests to the long-standing existence and increasing popularity of video art in Asia. It profiles Chinese artist Yang Fudong, a pioneer in the medium of video as art in the 1990s. It also brings our attention to One World Exposition, an exclusive platform for new media works established by Videotage, Asia’s new media art collective which has been around since the 1980s. Aside from getting a glimpse of the artist’s expanding oeuvre, readers can learn more about Videotage’s mission to bring new media works to the fore in Asia.

Click here to read the full post on artist Yang Fudong and One World Exposition.

Unparalleled “NEW AGE: NEW MEDIA” exhibition shows 12 Australian and Chinese video works — 7 month China tour

July 2011

Zhang Xiaotao, screenshot of 'Scar'. Image courtesy of China Art Projects.

This post reports on the exhibition, “New Age: New Media“, a collaboration between Australia and China showcasing new media works created by six Australian artists and six Chinese artists. Mostly video pieces, these works explore the interaction between the values, beliefs and behaviours of individuals, and their living and working environments. With an emphasis on education through residencies and visits to tertiary institutions, the initiative demonstrates the potential of new media art as a platform for communication and understanding between cultures.

Click here to read the full post on the “New Age: New Media” cross-cultural project.

How to exhibit, collect and preserve new media art — resource alert

May 2011 

Shahzia Sikander, 'The last post,' 2010, HD Video, 10 minutes. Image courtesy e-flux.com.

If you are thinking of jumping on the video art bandwagon, this post is for you. Learn how to exhibit, collect and preserve new media art with Electronic Arts Intermix, a leading non-profit resource for video art with forty years of experience in the field. From single-channel video works to computer-based art to media installations, this is the go-to resource when it comes to understanding how to display and care for your new media collection.

Artists turn to video art: Will collectors follow suit? The Art Newspaper examines

April 2011

Nam June Paik, 'Untitled', 1993. Player piano, fifteen televisions, two cameras, two laser disc players, one electric light and light bulb, and wires, approximately 254 x 266.7 x 121.9 cm. Image courtesy moma.org.

Is video art a worthy investment to make? In a survey of the presence of video art in museums, art fairs, galleries and private collections, The Art Newspaper reveals that video art has slowly but surely become a mainstay in all but private collections, with individual collectors just beginning to embrace the idea of acquiring video art. Questions about the permanence and value of video art remain, but it looks like video art will feature more prominently in art collections in times to come.

Click here to read the full post on collectors’ responses to video art.

Want to have a browse through our archives yourself? Click here to take a look at what else we have written on video art in Asia, and click here to view our entire Topics list.

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Related Topics: video artnew media art, lists

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