Filipino artists you need to know now – The Spot

A seemingly innocuous list of a country’s top ten emerging artists stirs up a feverish debate among its art community.

In his 18 June 2013 article 10 New Filipino Artists You Need to Know Now on Spot.ph, Marc Chavez provides the following names of the top emerging artists in the Philippines. The list, which struck up an online debate, is noteworthy for its diversity and high representation of women artists.

Click here to read Marc Chavez’s 10 New Filipino Artists You Need to Know Now on Spot.ph

Martha Atienza, 'My Navel Is Buried in the Sea', film still, a three screen video installation  2011, hd video, 31 mins.   Image courtesy the artist's website.

Martha Atienza, ‘My Navel Is Buried in the Sea’, film still, a three screen video installation,
2011, HD video, 31 mins. Image courtesy the artist’s website.

  • Martha Atienza is a Dutch-Filipino film and video maker who won the 2012 Ateneo Arts Award prize for her video installation Gilubong ang Akon Pusod sa Dagat (My Navel is Buried in the Sea).
Olivia D'Aboville 'Coral Garden' 2012. Image courtesy the artist's website.

Olivia D’Aboville, ‘Coral Garden’, 2012. Image courtesy the artist’s website.

  • Olivia D’Aboville is a French-Filipina sculptor who studied tapestry and textile construction and weaves biological maritime creatures.
Tengal Drilon is a Filipino sound artist, curator and filmmaker. Image courtesy Tumblr, 2013.

Tengal Drilon is a Filipino sound artist, curator and filmmaker. Image courtesy Tumblr, 2013.

  • Tengal Drilon is a multimedia art practitioner who works as a sound artist, musician, composer, art curator and filmmaker. Drilon is also founder of the Sabaw Media Art Kitchen, a non-profit stationed at the crossroads of art and technology, which promotes cultural media throughout Southeast Asia.
A Kristian Henson design. Image courtesy thefoxisblack.com.

A Kristian Henson design. Image courtesy thefoxisblack.com.

Winner Jumalon, 'Man' 2007, oil on canvas. Image courtesy artvalue.com.

Winner Jumalon, ‘Man’, 2007, oil on canvas. Image courtesy artvalue.com.

Hanna Pettyjohn, 'Unbundled II (VW)', 2012, oil on canvas, 6 x 4.5 ft • 72 x 54 in • 182.88 x 137.16 cm. Image courtesy Silverlens Gallery.

Hanna Pettyjohn, ‘Unbundled II (VW)’, 2012, oil on canvas. Image courtesy Silverlens Gallery.

  • Hanna Pettyjohn explores relationships between American and Filipino cultures with her portraits of family members. Probing the nostalgia for home often associated with diaspora communities, Pettyjohn unanchors objects from their original meaning to create a sense of displacement or discomfort.
Goldie Poblador, animation still, 2013. Image courtesy the artist's website.

Goldie Poblador, animation still, 2013. Image courtesy the artist’s website.

Mark Salvatus, 'Secret Garden', 2009-2011, Visual Arts Centre, La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia. Image courtesy of artist.

Mark Salvatus, ‘Secret Garden’, 2009-2011, Visual Arts Centre, La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia. Image courtesy the artist.

Shireen Seno, Big Boy film still, 2012. Image courtesy the artist.

Shireen Seno, ‘Big Boy’, film still, 2012. Image courtesy the artist.

  • Shireen Seno is a Tokyo-born, Manila-based filmmaker who received international recognition for her Super-8 feature film Big Boy (2012). Setting the individual story of a Filipino boy against the national historical backdrop of colonial rule, Seno’s film, claims Chavez in his list, “like much of her photography, exists between the space of nostalgia and dreams.”
Costantino Zicarelli, "1:11:00 (after the birds)." Image courtesy manilaartblogger.com.

Costantino Zicarelli, ‘1:11:00 (after the birds)’, 2010. Image courtesy manilaartblogger.com.

  • Costantino Zicarelli is a Filipino-Italian artist who creates monochromatic installations that explore contemporary subcultures and feature macabre imagery.

The list stirred up some controversy with readers, as many of the comments rued the fact that most of the listed artists were raised or lived abroad. This prompted Chavez to post a response defending his choices.

The Philippines is a country with a complex history of colonization and occupation. And I also felt that to write about the Philippines, I could not ignore the Philippine diaspora and its results. Having said that, I think I came up with a balanced list that I felt represented the work and practices of contemporary Filipino artists based in Metro Manila. My two criteria for inclusion in this list was:

1. I thought their work was good and worth writing about.
2. They identify as Filipino and have recently been working and/or showing in Metro Manila.

7 of the artists were born in the Philippines. 6 were educated in the Philippines, 4 in other countries. 3 are Filipinos of mixed racial heritage.

What do you think of Chavez’s picks for the top ten Filipino artists? Who should he have included? Leave us your thoughts in the comments below.

Susan Kendzulak

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Related Topics: Filipino artists, Manila art spaces, lists, globalisation of art

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Comments

Filipino artists you need to know now – The Spot — 1 Comment

  1. Filipino culture is completely hybrid. We have been a melting pot for hundreds of years, more so now since the Overseas Contract Worker migration wave that began in the 80s. This is a fact, and this article is just a reflection of that view. Would anyone say an Irish American was not American if he held an American passport and identified as American? I don´t think so. Let´s stop with the exclusion of racially or culturally mixed Filipinos from Philippine art scene. It’s post colonial and dumb, not to mention extremely rude.

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