Holiday gifts for art lovers: Artworks on Art Radar’s wish list



All you want for Christmas is a collectable piece of contemporary art? Art Radar has compiled a list of desirable artworks for this holiday season.

Third on Art Radar‘s series of holiday season gifts for art lovers is a list of artworks, including video, sculpture, ceramics, silkscreen printing and photography, from emerging, mid-career and established artists.

Anida Yoeu Ali, 'Enter the Ruins', 2012, single channel HD video, looped, 4 min. Edition of 5. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery, Hong Kong.

Anida Yoeu Ali, ‘Enter the Ruins’, 2012, single channel HD video, looped, 4 min. Edition of 5. Image courtesy Karin Weber Gallery, Hong Kong.

If you wish to find out how to purchase any of the artworks in this list, contact Kate Cary Evans on kate@artradarasia.com.

Enter the Ruins, 2012 ⎜Anida Yoeu Ali (b. 1974)

Single channel HD video, looped, 4m:00s, edition of 5

Price: HKD8000/USD1030

Featured in the recent exhibition “Site/Cambodia” in Hong Kong, Enter the Ruins is characteristic of Cambodian artist Anida Yoeu Ali’s practice. From the use of religious aesthetics to durational public performances, her works push the performative moment into a public sphere. With particular focus on issues of diasporic identity, Ali’s thematic interest in hybridity, transcendence and otherness map new political and spiritual landscapes.

Contact Kate Cary Evans on kate@artradarasia.com for more on how to buy this work.

Chen Ke, 'Xiao E. Cap', 2011, silkscreen print, 78 x 78 cm. Edition of 78. Image courtesy Star Gallery, Beijing.

Chen Ke, ‘Xiao E. Cap’, 2011, silkscreen print, 78 x 78 cm. Edition of 78.

Xiao E. Cap, 2011 ⎜Chen Ke (b. 1978)

Silkscreen print, 78 x 78 cm, edition of 78

Price: RMB15,000/USD2462 (approx.)

Chen Ke is a young Chinese artist who has become famous for her portraits of young girls with round rosy-cheeked faces set in dreamy expressions. Her innocent looking subjects are inspired by the artist herself and express the tribulations and challenges of growing up and of facing the world. In Xiao E. Cap the artist uses thorns, protruding from the little girl’s hat, as a symbol for wanting to break out of constraints, be they social, cultural or psychological. The thorns point to the desire and excitement about experiencing a whole new world.

Chen was featured in the 2009 book Young Chinese Artists: The Next Generation. Read about it here.

Contact Kate Cary Evans on kate@artradarasia.com for more on how to buy this work.

Bui Cong Khanh, 'Vase Number 3', 2009, porcelain, 52 x 15 x 15 cm. Image courtesy 10 Chancery Lane Gallery, Hong Kong.

Bui Cong Khanh, ‘Vase Number 3′, 2009, porcelain, 52 x 15 x 15 cm.

Vase Number 3, 2009 ⎜Bui Cong Khanh (b. 1972)

Porcelain, 52 x 15 x 15 cm

Price: upon request

Vietnamese artist Bui Cong Khanh’s work addresses history and contemporary society in Vietnam and the impact that global capital is having upon it. The blue-and-white porcelain vases that are both traditional and contemporary combine the dichotomy of the fast-changing society of his country. Bui’s vases address what he calls “the character of the present”, the sounds and sights of daily life. Traditional forms interplay with symbols of quotidian life, such as flip flops and Coca-Cola encased by classic Vietnamese ornamentation, or Buddha and the artist’s own self-portrait.

In Vase Number 3, women can be seen showering in the open air surrounded by classical cloud motifs. A raised left hand painted in red references the Communist government. These are just some of the images upon his complicated narratives that embellish the vessel. Bui’s porcelain vases were part of APT6 at QAGOMA in 2009.

Contact Kate Cary Evans on kate@artradarasia.com for more on how to buy this work.

Wang Keping, 'Untitled 1', 2002, cherry wood, height 57 cm. Image courtesy 10 Chancery Lane Gallery, Hong Kong.

Wang Keping, ‘Untitled 1′, 2002, cherry wood, height 57 cm.

Untitled 1, 2002 ⎜Wang Keping (b. 1949)

Cherry wood, height 57 cm

Price: upon request

Wang Keping is one of the founders of the first non-conformist artist’s group “The Stars” (Xing Xing), which was formed in 1979 during the post-Cultural Revolution “Beijing Spring.” He was a pioneer in the fight for artistic freedom in China but has been living in Paris since 1984. Wang Keping sculpts his work from wood, exploring femininity, maternal love, masculinity, abstraction and pure forms.

Form and nature guide Wang’s path as a sculptor. Untitled 1 is characteristic of his practice, following a semi-abstract form which is clearly that of a woman, but typically without facial features. The idol-like figure inspires reflection on the pure form of ‘woman’, love and motherhood. The Ullens Centre for Contemporary Art in Beijing recently held Wang’s latest solo exhibition. Read more about it here.

Contact Kate Cary Evans on kate@artradarasia.com for more on how to buy this work.

Aisha Khalid, 'I was you', 2013, gouache on wasli, 50.8 x 69.8 cm. Image courtesy Corvi Mora, London.

Aisha Khalid, ‘I was you’, 2013, gouache on wasli, 50.8 x 69.8 cm.

I was you, 2013 ⎜Aisha Khalid (b. 1972)

Gouache on wasli, 50.8 x 69.8 cm

Price: upon request

Aisha Khalid is one of the most influential and innovative neo-miniaturists from Pakistan. Her practice spans different media, from miniature painting to site-specific installation. Her miniatures are exquisitely detailed, rich in traditional Islamic motifs and symbolism. The artist comments on issues of a political nature, and her work is influenced by her own personal experiences around gender, aesthetics, the role of women, and power relationships between the East and West.

Khalid often juxtaposes the decorative surfaces of traditional miniature painting with deeply controversial social and political messages. In I was you meaning and symbolism are subdued and subtle, more difficult to decipher than in her other works. Read more about the artist here.

Contact Kate Cary Evans on kate@artradarasia.com for more on how to buy this work.

Yang Yongliang, 'The Bowl of Taipei', 20..., Epson Ultragiclee print on Hahnemühle traditional photo paper, 150 x 150 cm. Image courtesy Magda Danysz Gallery, Paris and Shanghai.

Yang Yongliang, ‘A Bowl of Taipei 1′, 2013, Epson Ultragiclee print on Hahnemühle traditional photo paper, 100 x 100 cm. Edition of 7.

A Bowl of Taipei 1, 2012 ⎜Yang Yongliang (b. 1972)

Epson Ultragiclee print on Hahnemühle traditional photo paper, 100 x 100 cm, edition of 7

Price: EUR10,000/USD13,583 (approx.)

Yang Yongliang creates traditional Chinese landscapes intermingled with contemporary cityscapes. In his large black and white photographs, classically designed mountains and rivers landscapes (shanshui) are populated by skyscrapers, construction sites and building cranes, city nightlights and traffic.

In “A Bowl of Taipei” series of photographs, the artist places his characteristic landscapes in an ancient porcelain bowl. In the example shown, the bowl is a Jingdezhen ware from the reign of Emperor Hongwu (1368-1398 AD) of the Ming Dynasty, decorated with a traditional motif of chrysanthemums. First cultivated in China as a flowering herb as far back as the fifteenth century BC, the chrysanthemum is renowned as one of the Four Gentlemen (四君子) in Chinese art, the others being the plum blossom, the orchid, and bamboo. The chrysanthemum is said to have been favored by Tao Qian, an influential Chinese poet, and is symbolic of nobility. It is also one of the four symbolic seasonal flowers. Chrysanthemums have also been the favourite topic in hundreds of ancient poems of China.

Read more about Yang Yongliang in an interview with Art Radar here.

Contact Kate Cary Evans on kate@artradarasia.com for more on how to buy this work.

Abbas Kiarostami, "The Snow Series", 'AK46', 2002, digital print on rag paper, 57 x 90 cm. Edition of 7. Rossi and Rossi, London and Hong Kong.

Abbas Kiarostami, ‘AK46′ from “The Snow Series”,  2002, digital print on rag paper, 57 x 90 cm. Edition of 7.

AK46 from “The Snow Series”, 2010 ⎜Abbas Kiarostami (b. 1940)

Digital print on rag paper, 57 x 90 cm, edition of 7

Price: EUR12,000/USD16,300 (approx.)

Iranian Abbas Kiarostami has been an active filmmaker since 1970 and has been involved in over forty films, including shorts and documentaries. Kiarostami studied at the College of Fine Arts of the University of Tehran, then worked as a graphic designer, book illustrator, and advertising filmmaker. In 1969, he co-founded the cinema division of the Institute for the Intellectual Development of Children & Young Adults (Kanoon) in Tehran. Since 1970, he has directed numerous films for which he has received several international awards, among them the Roberto Rossellini Prize of the Cannes Film Festival (1992), the Golden Palm of the Cannes Film Festival for Taste of Cherry (1997), the UNESCO’s Frederico Fellini Medal in gold (1997), the Konrad Wolf Prize of the Academy of the Arts, Berlin (2003), and the Praemium Imperiale (2004). Kiarostami is also a poet, painter, illustrator, and graphic designer.

In his 2002 photographs “The Snow Series”, the artist captures silent scenes in the snow-covered countryside, in shades of white, grey and black, creating a nostalgic atmosphere of peace and tranquility. The cinematic nature of his shots lend to the images a power of creating lost memories and stories in the viewer’s mind.

Read about Kiarostami’s “The Snow Series” at the first contemporary art auction in Tehran in 2012 here.

Contact Kate Cary Evans on kate@artradarasia.com for more on how to buy this work.

Lee Jae-Hyo, ' 0121-1110=109091', 2009, big cone pine wood, 220 x 140 x 105 cm. Image courtesy Kwai Fung Hin Art Gallery, Hong Kong.

Lee Jae-Hyo, ‘ 0121-1110=109091′, 2009, big cone pine wood, 220 x 140 x 105 cm.

0121-1110=109091′, 2009 ⎜Lee Jae-Hyo (b. 1965)

Big cone pine wood, 220 x 140 x 105 cm

Price: HKD420,000/USD54,175 (approx.)

Lee Jae-Hyo’s works reveal the delicate, minimalistic sensibility typical of Korean art. The artist shows immense respect for natural materials, but also the will to dominate what nature has provided. One is immediately struck by his craftsmanship and the immaculate yet intricate results. His traditionally biomorphic or quasi-geometric works have in recent years transformed into organically shaped art-design works. The artist blends art and applied arts, which have maintained a distance in the West until recently, into one whole. He bridges the gap between the two practices creating works of art that can also have a function, such as this example: is it a table, a sofa, a bench? Is it a sculpture? The artist’s ability to naturalise his forms is reflected in his skill in blending art and design, creating unique multi-use works of art.

Read about the artist’s first solo exhibition in Hong Kong in 2010 here.

If you wish to find out how to purchase any of the artworks in this list, contact Kate Cary Evans on kate@artradarasia.com.

This collection has been compiled by Lotroom: A platform for the sale of contemporary art. Art Radar does not take commission on any sales related to this post.

 C. A. Xuan Mai Ardia

Related topics: lists, Chinese artists, Korean artists, Cambodian artists, Vietnamese artists, Pakistani artists, Iranian artists, video art, photography, silkscreen printing, sculpture, ceramics, miniatures

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