Eros, Life and Death: the photography of Japan’s Nobuyoshi Araki at Musée Guimet, Paris

A major retrospective at Musée Guimet in Paris delineates 50 years of Nobuyoshi Araki’s career.

With over 400 photographs taken between 1965 and 2016, “Araki” is one of the most important and comprehensive surveys dedicated to the influential Japanese photographer.

Nobuyoshi Araki, "Imparfait – Futur (Past tense – Future)", 1979-2011/2012, silver gelatin print, 27 x 40,6 cm. Taka Ishii Gallery. © Nobuyoshi Araki / Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Imparfait – Futur (Past tense – Future)’, 1979-2011/2012, gelatin silver print, 27 x 40.6 cm. Taka Ishii Gallery. © Nobuyoshi Araki / Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Launched on 13 April, “Araki” runs at the Musée National des Arts Asiatiques–Guimet (MNAAG) in Paris until 5 September 2016, and marks one of the major retrospectives of the Japanese photographer’s work ever held in France. Curated by Jérôme Neutres 
and Jérôme Ghesquière, the exhibition features more than 400 photographs selected from among the thousands he shot between 1965 and 2016 now in private and public collections around the world. The images range from one of the oldest series of photographs from 1965 collected in a book entitled Theater of Love to unpublished works such as his commission for MNAAG created in 2015 entitled Tokyo-Tombeau, as well as a selection of historical photographs from Japan from the Guimet collection.

The exhibition scenography is designed by A+Y, a Japanese architectural duo composed of Naori Yamazoe and Chiaki Yatsui who explore the interaction between art and architecture. Their exhibition design resulted from an attentive study of the universe of the artist to create a harmonious dialogue between the space and the artist’s oeuvre.

Renjô Shimooka, 'Prisonnier Présenté Devant le Daimyô Vêtu d’un Kariginu', 1860s, albumen print on paper, inv. Savatier 04, Musée National des Arts Asiatiques–Guimet. Photo: MNAAG. © Musée National des Arts Asiatiques–215 Guimet (dist. RMNGP).

Renjô Shimooka, ‘Prisonnier Présenté Devant le Daimyô Vêtu d’un Kariginu’, 1860s, albumen print on paper, inv. Savatier 04, Musée National des Arts Asiatiques–Guimet. Photo: MNAAG. © Musée National des Arts Asiatiques–215 Guimet (dist. RMNGP).

"Araki", 13 April - 5 September 2016, Musée national des arts asiatiques-Guimet. Image courtesy MNAAG.

“Araki”, 13 April – 5 September 2016, Musée National des Arts Asiatiques-Guimet. Image courtesy MNAAG.

Araki: one of Japan’s greatest photographers

Nobuyoshi Araki was born in 1940 in Tokyo and is considered one of the most prolific and greatest living Japanese photographers. From 1959 to 1963, Araki studied photography and filmmaking at Chiba University’s Engineering Department, Tokyo. Among his major influences are Italian Neo-Realist and French Nouvelle Vague films, with his favourite directors being Cari Theodor Dreyer and Robert Bresson. After graduation, he went on to work for Dentsu, an advertising agency, where he started his career as a commercial photographer and worked there for nine years.

"Araki", 13 April - 5 September 2016, Musée national des arts asiatiques-Guimet. Image courtesy MNAAG.

“Araki”, 13 April – 5 September 2016, Musée National des Arts Asiatiques-Guimet. Image courtesy MNAAG.

However, Araki would use his free time to go out in the city and shoot his personal work, documenting everyday urban life in Ginza. As quoted in a text by Taka Ishii Gallery for his 2011 exhibition “Theater of Love”, Araki said: “My Dentsu era was my training era.” It was during that time that the artist experimented with photography beyond the parameters of commercial techniques and styles, and began to create handmade photobooks by pasting prints onto sketchbooks. His first series, Xeroxed Photo Albums, comprised 26 volumes made with the facilities and materials available to him at work and which he self-published in 1970.

In 1965, Araki held his first ever solo exhibition at Shinjuku Station Building, with images from what would be later known as his Theater of Love series, comprising photographs of intimate love and sexual as well as citylife scenes.

Nobuyoshi Araki, 'Voyage Sentimental (Sentimental Journey)', 1971, gelatin silver print, 35,4 x 43,2 cm. Collection of Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris. Gift of Dai Nippon Printing Co. Ltd, Japon, inv. MEP 1995.126 © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Voyage Sentimental (Sentimental Journey)’, 1971, gelatin silver print, 35.4 x 43.2 cm. Collection of Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris. Gift of Dai Nippon Printing Co. Ltd, Japon, inv. MEP 1995.126 © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

It was during his time at the agency that he met his future wife, Yoko Aoki, in 1968 and married in 1971. One of his most important photobooks and series of photographs entitled Sentimental Journey, published in 1971 in a limited edition of 1000, documented the couple’s honeymoon from a very intimate perspective.

In 1974, he helped found the Workshop School of Photography in collaboration with Shōmei Tōmatsu and Daido Moriyama, and in 1976 he opened Araki Private Photo School with about ten students.

In 1980, Araki published Photo Diary, an important book that veered away from the sincere and honest portrayal of the reality of life seen in his documentation of his honeymoon. In a 2011 interview with TransAsia Photography Review, Araki said about the series:

For me, taking photographs can be just like keeping a diary. During the 1980s, everyone was taking pictures like a diary. In that cultural climate, the first cameras with a date function were introduced to the public. Such a camera allowed you to date all your photographs. It could be manipulated so easily. I took photographs, one after another, with different dates since I could switch the past with the future by manipulating the dates on an automatic camera. Photography is lying, and I am a liar by nature. Anything in front of you, except a real object, is fake. Photographers might consider how to express their love through photography, but those photographs are “fake love.” That is how I make the future and past.

Nobuyoshi Araki, 'Voyage d’Hiver (Winter Journey)', 1989 (27/12/89), gelatin silver print, 35,4 x 43,2 cm. Collection of Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris. Gift of Dai Nippon Printing Co. Ltd, Japon, inv MEP 1995.142. © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Voyage d’Hiver (Winter Journey)’, 1989 (27/12/89), gelatin silver print, 35.4 x 43.2 cm. Collection of Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris. Gift of Dai Nippon Printing Co. Ltd, Japon, inv MEP 1995.142. © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

His wife’s passing from ovarian cancer in 1990 marked an important moment in his life and artistic production. The following year, Araki published Winter Journey, comprising photos taken during Yoko’s hospitalisation and her funeral. Araki’s lens turned from a focus on the passions of life and sensual pleasures to the haunting presence of thanatos – death. In an interview with Nan Goldin in 1995, Araki said:

Photography was destined to be involved with death. Reality is in color, but at its beginnings photography always discolored reality and turned it into black and white. Color is life, black and white is death. A ghost was hiding in the invention of photography.

Nobuyoshi Araki, 'mparfait – Futur (Past tense – Future)', 1979-2011/2012, gelatin silver print, 27 x 40.6 cm. Taka Ishii Gallery, inv. NA-PtF_04. © Nobuyoshi Araki / Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Imparfait – Futur (Past tense – Future)’, 1979-2011/2012, gelatin silver print, 27 x 40.6 cm. Taka Ishii Gallery, inv. NA-PtF_04. © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

During his entire life and career, Araki photographed for magazines and films, shot intimate portraits of famous cinema and music stars, as well as models for famous fashion labels. He is considered a provocative genius, whose photography is profoundly erotic and sensual, and has been at times called pornographic. He is well known internationally for his photographs of women bound according to the ancestral rules of kinbaku – the Japanese art of bondage, a practice originating in the 15th century.

Nobuyoshi Araki, '67 Retour arrière (67 Shooting Back)', 2007/2008, impression directe RP, 152,4 x 101,6 cm. Private collection, New York. © Nobuyoshi Araki/Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ’67 Retour Arrière (67 Shooting Back)’, 2007-2008, contact print (impression directe RP), 152.4 x 101.6 cm. Private collection, New York. © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Araki: the exclusivity of analogue photography

Araki exclusively shoots in film and never intends to approach the now ubiquitous digital medium. He is convinced that analogue is more ‘true’ than digital, as it carries physical and sentimental traces of the photographer himself, as he tells TransAsia:

Pictures taken by a digital camera only show the instant moment. A digital camera copies the presence of reality. What you see is what you get. However, there may be something added to the frame during the process of developing or printing when it comes to gelatin silver print. There could be sentimental feelings in those photographs. This kind of “mysterious secret” goes into the process of using a film camera. It is humane, so it is appropriate for photographic expression. I do not feel the body temperature of the subject in digital image. There is no physicality. A digital camera turns a photographer into a robot, with no feeling.

Yokohama shashin [Yokohama studio], tattooed groom seen from the back, 1870-1880, albumen pring on paper , inv. AP16157, Musée national des arts asiatiques – Guimet. © Musée national des arts asiatiques – 239 Guimet (dist. RMNGP)/Photo : MNAAG.

Yokohama shashin [Yokohama studio], tattooed groom seen from the back, 1870-1880, albumen print on paper, inv. AP16157, Musée National des Arts Asiatiques-Guimet. Photo: MNAAG. © Musée National des Arts Asiatiques – 239 Guimet.

In an interview with honeyee in 2009 on the occasion of his 69th birthday and exhibition, Araki said:

There is no room for putting your own feelings or affection in a digital project. I can say a digital is a bright darkroom. If you start your career with a digital camera from the beginning than you may not care, but photographs should come out of darkness. If you start from a bright place, then you can’t see the darkness.

Nobuyoshi Araki, 'Imparfait – Futur (Past tense – Future)', 1979-2011/2012 silver gelatin print, 27 x 40.6 cm. Taka Ishii Gallery, inv. NA-PtF_30. © Nobuyoshi Araki / Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Imparfait – Futur (Past tense – Future)’, 1979-2011/2012, gelatin silver print, 27 x 40.6 cm. Taka Ishii Gallery, inv. NA-PtF_30. © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

In his preface to the MNAAG exhibition catalogue entitled The Conviction of Nobuyoshi Araki, Tadao Ando writes:

In our era when the digital camera is in full bloom, [Araki] clings to the exclusive use of film. He already has bought the quantity necessary for his entire life. Effectively he imprints each instant on film by exhausting his life and his soul. In the same way as Araki’s photos transmit this determination, they also attract people and don’t let go. As long as he lives, he will never stop running with his camera in hand. It is through Yoko, my love (1978) that I had my first ever encounter with the photos of Nobuyoshi Araki. There was a confrontation between the soul of the photographed body and that of the photographer. I felt a very vivid shock, as if I had seen the light of the Pantheon for the first time.

Nobuyoshi Araki, 'Paysages avec couleurs (Colourscapes)', 1991, numeric print, 101.6 x 125.8 cm. Yoshii Gallery, inv. YG-10907-NA. © Nobuyoshi Araki / Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Paysages Avec Couleurs (Colourscapes)’, 1991, numeric print, 101.6 x 125.8 cm. Yoshii Gallery, inv. YG-10907-NA. © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

"Araki", 13 April - 5 September 2016, Musée national des arts asiatiques-Guimet. Image courtesy MNAAG.

“Araki”, 13 April – 5 September 2016, Musée National des Arts Asiatiques-Guimet. Image courtesy MNAAG.

Araki at the Guimet: a thematic journey

The exhibition at the Musée Guimet is organised thematically, starting from a collection of photobooks comprising a great number of Araki’s publications in an arrangement called the “Library”. In his essay “Araki the writer” for the exhibition catalogue, Philippe Forest writes:

I doubt that there is a photographer to whom we can attribute more books than to Araki. His Complete Works – if we imagine that they could ever be collected – would form a collection that would make the most productive of novelists, the most prolific of poets, and the most fertile of philosophers pale with envy. […] Ten years ago, it was estimated that his books comprised more than 300 titles. […] The editorial output of the artist knows a quasi-exponential progression – which is only the faithful reflection of the artist’s formidable activity. The more time passes, the more Araki publishes. And the hypothetic library that will collate his entire oeuvre takes such dimensions that defy our imagination.

Kazumasa Ogawa (1860-1929), F52 Lotus, 1877-1882, albumen print on paper, inv. AP11815, Musée national des arts asiatiques – Guimet. © Musée national des arts asiatiques – 209 Guimet (dist. RMNGP)/Photo : MNAAG.

Kazumasa Ogawa, ‘F52 Lotus’, 1877-1882, albumen print on paper, inv. AP11815, Musée national des arts asiatiques–Guimet. Photo:MNAAG. © Musée National des Arts Asiatiques – 209 Guimet (dist. RMNGP).

Nobuyoshi Araki, 'Fleurs (Flowers)', 1985 / 2008 numeric print, 153,7 x 101.6 cm. Private collection, New York. © Nobuyoshi Araki/Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Fleurs (Flowers)’, 1985-2008, numeric print, 153.7 x 101.6 cm. Private collection, New York. © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Progressing through the exhibition display, the photographic career and output of Araki’s unfold through thematic presentations, including flowers, photography as autobiography, his relation with his wife Yoko, eroticism, desire, passing through Araki’s studio, but also the evocation of death in his latest commission.

“Flowers” is a collection of vivid close-ups of flowers, both sensually evocative and charged with a colourful realism that links Araki’s oeuvre to his cultural roots, recalling ikebana, the meditative art of Japanese flower arrangement, as curator Jérôme Ghesquière mentions in his accompanying essay.

Nobuyoshi Araki, 'Fête des anges : scènes de sexe (Feast of Angels : Sex Scenes)', 1992, impression ultérieure directe RP, 4.,4 x 60.1 cm. Taka Ishii Gallery, inv. NA-PH_AbA_014. © Nobuyoshi Araki / Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Fête des Anges: Scènes de Sexe (Feast of Angels: Sex Scenes)’, 1992, contact print (impression ultérieure directe RP), 45.4 x 60.1 cm. Taka Ishii Gallery, inv. NA-PH_AbA_014. © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

MNAAG’s Director Sophie Makariou writes in her catalogue essay “Madame Bovary chained or the martial art of Araki”:

The photographic medium, reputed as cold, passes from incarnation to incandescence through the grace of Araki’s eye and his engagement with his life. Living image, image of the living, the hyperrealism of simulation according to Jean Baudrillard. […] We could, without effort, use some simple guidelines for reading: flowers have sexual organs, they wait […] to be fertilised, sometimes by […] insects […]. But finally Araki’s flowers cannot be reduced to a capture of the female sex, just metaphorised, as a large close-up. […] And then there are almost modest flower compositions, which we could call memorial […]. These images touch us, simply.

And memorial they were: the first flowers that Araki ever photographed were higan bana or cemetery flowers. He asked the graveyard guardian to save flowers for him and he would photograph them against a plain white background.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ;Fleur Rondeau (Flower Rondeau)', 1997, Cibachrome print, 60 x 90 cm, Kamel Mennour, Paris, inv. NA249. © Nobuyoshi Araki/Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Fleur Rondeau (Flower Rondeau)’, 1997, cibachrome print, 60 x 90 cm, Kamel Mennour, Paris, inv. NA249. © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Nobuyoshi Araki, 'Sentimentalisme en photographie (Personal Sentimentalism in Photography)', 2000, gelatin silver print, 32.5 x 26.8 cm. Taka Ishii Gallery, inv. NA-SS_038. © Nobuyoshi Araki/Photo : Thierry Ollivier/Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Sentimentalisme en Photographie (Personal Sentimentalism in Photography)’, 2000, gelatin silver print, 32.5 x 26.8 cm. Taka Ishii Gallery, inv. NA-SS_038. Photo: Thierry Ollivier. © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

The next section presents Araki’s sentimental voyages. Araki maintains that photography is a form of lying, as he tells TransAsia:

Photography is a secondary thing, because actual objects are true and photography is a lie and merely a copy of reality. Existence comes first.

At the same time, photography is also a way of existing. In his catalogue text, curator Jérôme Neutres writes that Araki considers photography as a comic illusion and he quotes him as saying that “photography cannot accomplish the past and reality”. The artist writes:

Photography is nothing other than a game with myself. All photography is a private landscape.

Nobuyoshi Araki, 'Voyage à Tokyo (Tokyo Story)', 1989, black and white silver print, 50 x 60 cm. Kamel Mennour, Paris, inv. NA166. © Nobuyoshi Araki/ Image courtesy kamel mennour, Paris.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Voyage à Tokyo (Tokyo Story)’, 1989, black and white silver print, 50 x 60 cm. Kamel Mennour, Paris, inv. NA166. © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy kamel mennour, Paris.

Araki uses photography as we breathe, he shoots everywhere, all the time. In the “Kinbaku” section, this aspect of his practice is epitomised. Staging a fictitious reality, Araki makes of his subjects the expression of his fantasy, testimony of historical practice – Japanese bondage began in the 15th century – and reflection of a reality that is embarrassing to most. Bondage in ancient Japan was not used as a sexual practice, but rather as a form of punishment.

The practice made use of a profound knowledge of pressure points in the human body and was a discipline that followed a strict martial code, from the length of the ropes to their colour and the strength of the bonds according to the gravity of the punishable acts.

Nobuyoshi Araki, 'Kinbaku (bondage)', 1979, impression ultérieure gelatin silver print, 42.7 x 53.2 cm. Taka Ishii Gallery, inv. NA-PH_AbA_036. © Nobuyoshi Araki/Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Kinbaku (Bondage)’, 1979, impression ultérieure, gelatin silver print, 42.7 x 53.2 cm. Taka Ishii Gallery, inv. NA-PH_AbA_036. © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Araki transforms this historical method of torture into an extremely sensual and erotic act that functions as a sort of stop-motion, capturing the image of a body framed through the suspension of movement, much in the same guise as in miiye in theatre, where the actor stops in a particular position to emphasise the intensity and beauty of a particular moment. As quoted in Neutres’ essay, Araki says about kinbaku and photography:

Capturing people or objects in a photo is an act that consists of framing reality, putting it in a box. It is because of this that photography perpetuates itself. It has affinities with kinbaku, in the act of tying up things and events. […] I tie the models myself, and after the photography session, it is still me that unties the nots […].

Nobuyoshi Araki, 'Scènes de ciel (Sky Scenes)', 1991 / 2000, impression directe RP, 28 x 42.3 cm. Taka Ishii Gallery, inv. NA-PH_AbA_018. © Nobuyoshi Araki / Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Scènes de Ciel (Sky Scenes)’, 1991-2000, contact print (impression directe RP), 28 x 42.3 cm. Taka Ishii Gallery, inv. NA-PH_AbA_018. © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

2THESKY, My Ender (2009) constitutes another section of the exhibition, with images of the sky with the occasional passing clouds. The series refers to life and death, and their seamless connection. Araki says:

Life is always tied to the idea of death.

The infinity of the sky, its emptiness and the ephemeral nature of clouds reference this inextricable link between life and death that permeates all of Araki’s oeuvre.

Nobuyoshi Araki, 'Nu Tokyo (Tokyo Nude)', 1989/2005, gelatin silver print, 58.3 x 46.6 cm. Taka Ishii Gallery, inv. NA-TN 004. © Nobuyoshi Araki/Photo : Thierry Ollivier/Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Nu Tokyo (Tokyo Nude)’, 1989-2005, gelatin silver print, 58.3 x 46.6 cm. Taka Ishii Gallery, inv. NA-TN 004. Photo: Thierry Ollivier. © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Moving on to the commission for Musée Guimet, Tokyo Tombeau, Araki presents the images in the format of an ancient scroll, side by side, horizontally without a frame, rolling one after another as if ad infinitum, almost as a monument or memorial. Neutres in his catalogue quotes Araki as saying:

It’s a walk of life. Even though I am still alive, it’s as if I was already dead or gone up to paradise. This idea of photography on a scroll, in reference to the tradition of painting scrolls, came to me after the publication of my book Paradise is monochrome. It’s a flower garden or an entertainment park. I have fun with flowers. In fact, when we say kairaku en (entertainment park), we think it’s a pleasure park, while in fact, for me, it’s an ambiguous pleasure. The character kai that I use is not 快 [to please] but 怪 [monster]. Since my first flowers, since the beginning, nothing has changed. When I was young, I had fun with flowers from the cemetery of a Buddhist temple. And now, I have the impression that I am fabricating a cemetery where I can have fun.

Nobuyoshi Araki, 'Komari de « L’Amant d’août » (« Suicide à Tokyo ») (Komari from « L’Amant d’août » [« Suicide in Tokyo »])', 2002 / 2008, impression directe RP, 101.6 x 152.4 cm. Yoshii Gallery, inv. YG-10838-NA.© Nobuyoshi Araki

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Komari de «L’Amant d’Août» («Suicide à Tokyo») (Komari from «L’Amant d’août» [«Suicide in Tokyo»])’, 2002-2008, contact print (impression directe RP), 101.6 x 152.4 cm. Yoshii Gallery, inv. YG-10838-NA. © Nobuyoshi Araki.

The series takes the titled Tokyo Tombeau (Tokyo Tomb) because, Araki says,

Tokyo is a cemetery. It’s a park of attraction. In fact, I don’t separate paradise and hell. For me, if paradise doesn’t include elements of hell, it’s not paradise. For example, a woman that is exempt from all evil doesn’t attract me. You know, the king of hell, Enma in Japanese mythology, exists even in paradise. It is difficult for me therefore to express this nuance. I try to capture this idea in a photograph. It’s a current of thought to which I adhere since a long time. It’s the same as with flowers, I photograph those that are about to wither, without being conscious.

Nobuyoshi Araki, 'Amour de KaoRi (KaoRi Love)', 2007, acrylic paint on two black and white prints, 55.9 x 91.4 cm. Private collection, New York 261. © Nobuyoshi Araki/eyesencia.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Amour de KaoRi (KaoRi Love)’, 2007, acrylic paint on two black and white prints, 55.9 x 91.4 cm. Private collection, New York 261. © Nobuyoshi Araki/eyesencia.

Nobuyoshi Araki, 'Une histoire singulière à l’encre de Chine (Bokuju Kitan) (Marvelous Tales of Black Ink [Bokuju Kitan]', 2007 traditional ink (sumi) on black and white photograph, 101.6 x152.4 cm. The RBS Collection. © Nobuyoshi Araki/Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Nobuyoshi Araki, ‘Une Histoire Singulière à l’Encre de Chine (Bokuju Kitan) (Marvelous Tales of Black Ink [Bokuju Kitan]’, 2007, traditional ink (sumi) on black and white photograph, 101.6 x 152.4 cm. The RBS Collection. © Nobuyoshi Araki. Image courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Constellated by a narrative of loss, such as his wife’s death, the loss of sight in one eye and his prostate cancer, Araki’s life reflects his belief that photography is “a lie […] or another truth”, which represents reality through a filter, imperfect, yet carries the photographers emotions and soul. Depicting life, death and imperfection are underlying themes in Araki’s oeuvre.

Consciously or not, he unfailingly captures them in his photographs, whether they appear as erotic and sensual representations of the female body, voyeuristic urban scenes or still lives. On show are a series of photographs on which Araki has drawn and painted to make them visibly imperfect with his intervention. He is quoted in the essay by Philippe Forest as saying:

Often, I try to take the perfect photograph, but I also add a drawing to it, a sort of imperfection. Only to avoid shooting the perfect photograph. We know that there is nothing worse than perfection.

C. A. Xuan Mai Ardia

1257

Extracts from catalogue provided by the museum were translated from French into English by the author of the article.

Related Topics: Japanese artists, photography, body, sexuality, human body, museum shows, events in Paris

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