5 international biennials and triennials not to miss around Asia in Fall 2016

Art Radar compiles a list of its articles on biennials and triennials around East and Southeast Asia this Fall. 

From the 10th edition of Korea’s Busan Biennale to Japan’s new Triennial the Okayama Art Summit, these five international events will provide thoughtful reflection on new and refreshing curatorial practices in the context of the Biennale infrastructure.

Aichi Triennale venue: the former residence of the Ishihara Family, a registered national tangible cultural property which was built at the end of the Edo period. Image from aichitriennale.jp.

Aichi Triennale venue: the former residence of the Ishihara Family, a registered national tangible cultural property which was built at the end of the Edo period. Image from aichitriennale.jp.

 1. “Homo Faber: A Rainbow Caravan” – 3rd Aichi Triennale

From 11 August to 23 October 2016

Spread across Nagoya City, Okazaki City and Toyohashi City, the multi-venue 3rd Aichi Triennale boasts a rich programme comprising contemporary art, film and opera. This year’s edition placed a particular emphasis on regional diversity, with invited curators from Brazil and Turkey, in addition to curatorial members based in Japan.

An international roster of established and emerging artists will be featured in the exhibitions, including: Liu Wei (b. 1972, China), Song Sanghee (b. 1970, South Korea), Valsan Koorma Kolleri (b. 1953, India) and UuDam Tran Nguyen (b. 1971, Vietnam). As many as 20 artists in the exhibitions will be showing in Japan for the first time.

Ibelisse Guardia Ferragutti, 'SELVAGE', 2016, Performance, 180°Ø. Photo: Jochem Jurgens. Image courtesy the artist and Busan Biennale.

Ibelisse Guardia Ferragutti, ‘SELVAGE’, 2016, Performance, 180°Ø. Photo: Jochem Jurgens. Image courtesy the artist and Busan Biennale.

2. “Hybridizing Earth, Discussing Multitude” – 10th Busan Biennale

From 3 September to 30 November 2016 

The 10th edition of Korea’s Busan Biennale reflects on the complex notion of multitude by exploring the “here and now” of the biennials system, alongside its consequences on art production and promotion. Curated by international Korean curator and director of the Chinese How Art Museum in Wenzhou Yun Cheagab, the tenth edition of the Busan Biennale spreads across a 16,500-square-metre space including the Busan Museum of Art and the F1963 (KISWIRE Suyeong factory).

This year’s focus on diversity, humanity, global interconnections, and socio-political and economical consequences of the ‘biennale phenomenon’ is explored throughout two exhibitions, “Project 1: an/other avant-garde china-japan-korea” and “Project 2: Hybridizing Earth, Discussing Multitude”, and a series of academic and educational projects under the title of “Project 3: A Ground for Discussing Multitude, Moving Beyond Genres”.

Exterior view of MOCA Yinchuan. Photograph courtesy NAARO.

Exterior view of MOCA Yinchuan. Photograph courtesy NAARO.

3. For an Image, Faster Than Light” – 1st Yinchuan Biennale

From 9 September to 18 December 2016

Yinchuan City’s inaugural biennale is the first of its kind in northwest China and the second in the country. The event is curated by acclaimed artist-curator Bose Krishnamachari, who in 2010 co-founded the Kochi-Muziris Biennale with Riyas Komu. Yinchuan hopes to serve as the first major confluence of global contemporary art or artists in the country, and according to Krishnamachari, be inspired by “the universal elliptical philosophy of end is the beginning and beginning is the end”.

74 artists will be featured in the event, counting Anish Kapoor, Ai Weiwei, Heman Chong, Hassan Sharif, Riyas Komu, Slavs and Tatars, Basel Abbas & Ruanne Abou-Rahme and Joana Hadjithomas & Khalil Joreige amongst their number.

Peter Fischli + David Weiss, 'How to work better', 1991, mural. Installation view, Zurich-Oerlikon. © Peter Fischli David Weiss

Peter Fischli + David Weiss, ‘How to work better’, 1991, mural. Installation view, Zurich-Oerlikon. © Peter Fischli David Weiss

4. Okayama Art Summit 2016 – A New Triennial for Japan

From 9 October to 27 November 2016

Okayama Art Summit‘s Artistic Director Liam Gillick chose the curatorial concept of “Development” for the inaugural edition of the new Japanese triennial, which includes 31 international established and up-and-coming artists. Okayama is home to one of the three most famous gardens in Japan – the Kōrakuen (後楽園) – built in the early 18th century, and the Okayama Castle, around which the exhibition venues and cultural facilities are concentrated.

The 31 artists in the inaugural triennial all play with structures – be they ideological, formal or political – in very specific and individual ways. As the curator writes: each artist “layers their work upon what they encounter” and “they offer various levels of distance to the given structure”. The list of participating artists includes: Peter Fischli + David Weiss, Simon Fujiwara, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Pierre Huyghe, Joan Jonas, Shimabuku, Motoyuki Shitamichi, Rirkrit Tiravanija and Anton Vidokle.

Nguyen Tran Nam, 'We Never Fell', 2010, composite fibreglass sculptures, set of 5 140 x 50 cm (each). Collection of the Artist. Image courtesy Singapore Biennale.

Nguyen Tran Nam, ‘We Never Fell’, 2010, composite fibreglass sculptures, set of 5 140 x 50 cm (each). Collection of the Artist. Image courtesy Singapore Biennale.

5. “An Atlas of Mirror” – Singapore Biennale 2016

From 27 October 2016 to 26 February 2017

Singapore Biennale 2016 will present the work of more than 50 artists hailing from countries across the region such as Singapore, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vietnam. Hence, this edition will draw on diverse artistic viewpoints that trace the migratory and intertwining relationships within the region, and reflect on shared histories and current realities with East and South Asia.

Featured artists include India’s Hemali Bhuta (b. 1978), Vietnam’s Bùi Công Khánh (b. 1972), Manila-based Patricia Perez Eustaquio (b. 1977) and Thailand’s Sakarin Krue-On (b. 1965).

 

Click here to read more Art Radar articles on international biennales.

 

1269

Related Topics: BiennalesTriennalesCuratorial practiceEast AsianForums

Related Posts:

Subscribe to Art Radar for more highlights from Art Radar‘s archive

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Comments are closed.