Photo Gallery: “Coriolis Effect: Migration and Memory” at Khoj Studios, New Delhi

Indian and African artists explore notions of migration and memory at Khoj Studios.

The group exhibition “Coriolis Effect: Migration and Memory”, running from 29 September to 4 October 2016, brings together the work of seven Indian and African artists as the culmination of their month-long residency at Khoj Studios.

Lawrence of Nigeria who belongs to a royal family, photo taken in New Ashok Nagar, Delhi by Mahesh Shantaram. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Lawrence of Nigeria who belongs to a royal family, photo taken in New Ashok Nagar, Delhi by Mahesh Shantaram. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

“Coriolis Effect: Migration and Memory” at Khoj Studios is the culmination of the art organisation’s most recent artist residency, which saw the participation of seven Indian and African artists residing there from 16 August 2016. Coriolis Effect is an ongoing project, which according to Khoj, “seeks to activate the social, economic and cultural relationship and historical exchange which exists between India and the continent of Africa”.

Coriolis Effect references not only the migratory movements of the 21st century, but also historic ones, such as for example, the Non-Aligned movements of the 20th century and the shared cultural exchanges between India and Africa from the 1st century AD onwards. The concept for this residency grew out of a need to respond to the specific situation of Khoj’s neighbourhood in Khirkee Village. Khirkee is home to a large migrant community of diverse racial and cultural backgrounds. People come to Khirkee from other parts of the Indian Subcontinent as well as other regions of the Global South to look for education, employment, asylum or new beginnings, but often have to face the tension and experience of discrimination based on race and social differences.

Malini Kochupillai's newspaper centrespread entitled 'Khirkee Voice'. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Malini Kochupillai’s newspaper centrespread entitled ‘Khirkee Voice’. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

The 2016 Coriolis Effect focuses on issues of migration, including the voluntary and involuntary movement from one’s country to another, and of memory, both individual and collective. Through a diverse range of media and practices, the artists-in-residence address these themes looking at the influences and effects of migratory movements, as well as how memory is preserved, shaped and transformed, and finally how both migration and memory influence the shaping of identity.

The seven artists (.docx download) are Bangalore-based documentary photographer Mahesh Shantaram, Indo-Carribean artist Andrew Ananda Voogel, Nigerian artist Chibuike Uzoma, South Africans João Orecchia and Liza Grobler, Delhi-based photographer Malini Kochupillai and architect Swati Janu. The critic-in-residence is Delhi-based urban researcher Persis Taraporevala.

Andrew Ananda Voogel, 'Staring Hurts', a printed textile work. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Andrew Ananda Voogel, ‘Staring Hurts’, a printed textile work. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Curator at Khoj Studios, Sitara Chowfla, is quoted in the press release (PDF download) as saying about the project:

Khoj’s neighborhood of Khirkee Village is a dense urban-village environment that is home to a stream of immigrants from within India and across the global South. Arrival is often accompanied by tension and experiences of discrimination based on race and social difference. In this past year at Khoj, we have been deeply contemplating Migration – the voluntary or involuntarily movement of peoples from one place to another.

Globally, we have borne witness to the forced displacement of thousands of people from their homelands, and locally we have first hand experienced the trauma of re-location. We are also extremely interested in the formation of memory due to this migration – both individual and collective. We have invited artists to look back at the past and comprehend the present. What happens to your identity when you lose your place of belonging? What are memories of home and place that you carry with you?

Left to right: Persis Taraporevala (critic in residence), Swati Janu, Mahesh Shantaram, Malini Kochupillai, Andrew Amanda Voogel, Liza Grobler, Joao Orecchia. Image courtesy Khoj Studios.

Left to right: Persis Taraporevala (critic in residence), Swati Janu, Mahesh Shantaram, Malini Kochupillai, Andrew Amanda Voogel, Liza Grobler, Joao Orecchia. Image courtesy Khoj Studios.

Chibuike Uzoma, 'Rose Garden', drawing. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Chibuike Uzoma, ‘Rose Garden’, drawing. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

DjX (L) and Blessing (R) at a Congolese kitchen in Rajpur Khurd Extn, Delhi, photograph by Mahesh Shantaram. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

DjX (L) and Blessing (R) at a Congolese kitchen in Rajpur Khurd Extn, Delhi, photograph by Mahesh Shantaram. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Andrew Ananda Voogel, 'Congolese Youth Beaten to Delhi in Delhi', a printed textile work. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Andrew Ananda Voogel, ‘Congolese Youth Beaten to Delhi in Delhi’, a printed textile work. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Joao Orecchia with one of his sound instruments created using copper bowls. Image courtesy Khoj Studios.

Joao Orecchia with one of his sound instruments created using copper bowls. Image courtesy Khoj Studios.

Andrew Ananda Voogel, 'Sea of Eyes', a printed texttile work. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Andrew Ananda Voogel, ‘Sea of Eyes’, a printed texttile work. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Shakila is cook in a Congolese kitchen, photo by Mahesh Shantaram. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Shakila is cook in a Congolese kitchen, photo by Mahesh Shantaram. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Liza Grobler's hanging sculptural work. Image courtesy Khoj Studios.

Liza Grobler’s hanging sculptural work. Image courtesy Khoj Studios.

Samuel, leader of African students in India, is pictured here in his home in Vasant Kunj along with portraits of his father, a decorated officer in the Nigeria, photo by Mahesh Shantaram. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Samuel, leader of African students in India, is pictured here in his home in Vasant Kunj along with portraits of his father, a decorated officer in the Nigeria, photo by Mahesh Shantaram. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Andrew Ananda Voogel, 'Dekho Magar Pyaar Se', a printed textile work. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Andrew Ananda Voogel, ‘Dekho Magar Pyaar Se’, a printed textile work. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Photograph in Old Delhi by Chibuike Uzoma. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Photograph in Old Delhi by Chibuike Uzoma. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Yvann (right) at Jimmy Cafe, a local bar in Jalandhar, spoke about the many inhibitions of Indians that he himself is free from, photo by Mahesh Shantaram. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

Yvann (right) at Jimmy Cafe, a local bar in Jalandhar, spoke about the many inhibitions of Indians that he himself is free from, photo by Mahesh Shantaram. Image courtesy the artist and Khoj Studios.

 

“Coriolis Effect: Migration and Memory” runs from 29 September to 4 October 2016 at Khoj Studios, New Delhi.

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Related Topics: Indian artists, African artists, artist residencies, migration, memory, identity, photography, textile art, events in New Delhi, photo galleries, exhibitions

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