“The Incident of Art / The Art of Incident”: young Turkish artists at Akbank Sanat in Istanbul – in pictures

Ten young Turkish artists explore coincidence and art at Akbank Sanat in Istanbul.

Curated by Hasan Bülent Kahraman, the exhibition “The Incident of Art / The Art of Incident” brings together a group of innovative Turkish artists. Art Radar takes a look at some of the work on show.

Seydi Murat Koç, 'The Ones I Left to Chance', 9 Pieces, 2007-2016. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Seydi Murat Koç, ‘The Ones I Left to Chance’, 9 Pieces, 2007-2016. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

“The Incident of Art / The Art of Incident” runs until 3 December 2016 at Akbank Sanat in Istanbul. The exhibition explores links between coincidence and art, through investigating realities, objects, phenomenon and concepts. Through the prism of accidents and coincidences, it questions if there are opportunities in these accidental moments of coming together.

Elif Boyner, 'Mehmet’s Wife', 2016, photo print on saucer, 45 pieces. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Elif Boyner, ‘Mehmet’s Wife’, 2016, photo print on saucer, 45 pieces. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

The curatorial statement reads:

The world of today: the world of accidents. In a universe with such extended possibilities, at a time when living is intertwined with coincidence, the idiosyncrasy of art lies in it imposing itself as, and insisting to be, a possibility.

Because the core of art is consciousness and beauty. And beauty is the unidentifiable. We only encounter it by accident. And only in that encounter do we recognise beauty.

Elif Boyner, 'Mehmet’s Wife', 2016, photo print on saucer, 45 pieces. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Elif Boyner, ‘Mehmet’s Wife’, 2016, photo print on saucer, 45 pieces. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Kıvanç Martaloz, 'From the Series NatureMorte, Serpent Eating Its Own Tail', 2016, video Installation, 34", Ed. 3+1 A.P. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Kıvanç Martaloz, ‘From the Series NatureMorte, Serpent Eating Its Own Tail’, 2016, video Installation, 34″, Ed. 3+1 A.P. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

The group exhibition, curated by academic, art critic and art theoretician Hasan Bülent Kahraman, includes ten Turkish artists:

  • Elif Boyner
  • Fırat Engin
  • Burak Eren Güler
  • Erdal İnci
  • Seydi Murat Koç
  • Doruk Kumkumoğlu
  • Kıvanç Martaloz
  • Ardan Özmenoğlu
  • Eda Soylu
  • Nurtaç Ulutürk
Eda Soylu, 'Twisteryard' (From the project We Play), 2015, metal and concrete. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Eda Soylu, ‘Twisteryard’ (From the project “We Play”), 2015, metal and concrete. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Eda Soylu, born in Istanbul in 1990, works in a variety of media with a focus on sculpture and installation. She studied Fine Arts at Rhode Island School of Design and participated in the European Honours Program in Rome for six months. Her work has been exhibited in Turkey, Italy, Germany, Dubai and the United States and she has been shortlisted for The Sovereign Middle East and North Africa Art Prize (MENA Prize).

Eda Soylu, 'Twisteryard' (From the project We Play), 2015, metal and concrete. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Eda Soylu, ‘Twisteryard’ (From the project “We Play”), 2015, metal and concrete. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

In the exhibition Soylu presents an interactive installation called Twisteryard, inspired by the game Twister, where players stretch over one another and try not to fall. Soylu explains on her website that

Twisteryard is the story of a generation playing with death. It is the cemetery, the minefield, the flower garden of a generation playing Twister when they were young, who managed to survive only by chance.

Eda Soylu, 'Twisteryard' (From the project We Play), 2015, metal and concrete. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Eda Soylu, ‘Twisteryard’ (From the project “We Play”), 2015, metal and concrete. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Twister is a game where future actions seem unknowable, and uncertainty in the future is a theme that Soylu addresses with her work. She concludes by commenting that “Generation Y is a generation trying to survive by clinging on to colours.”

Burak Eren Güler, 'Untitled', 2016, iron bars, coil, 266 x 166 x 22 cm. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Burak Eren Güler, ‘Untitled’, 2016, iron bars, coil, 266 x 166 x 22 cm. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Born 1983 in Ankara, Erdal İnci is a new media artist who also works as a painter, photographer, filmmaker and street artist. He’s also known for his works creating online GIFs, which explore concepts of clones. He studied Fine Arts at Hacettepe University and he currently lives in Istanbul and Berlin.

Nurtaç Ulutürk, 'Untitled', 2016, installation Photo 167 pieces. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Nurtaç Ulutürk, ‘Untitled’, 2016, installation, photos, 167 pieces. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

İnci’s work explores human patterns through compositions of moments. İnci explained the inspiration for his exploration of repetitive movement in an interview with CNN:

When I started to look at the physics of music, I saw something that is unchanging. It’s like you have a unique moment, and it repeats endlessly in the form of musical notes. I realised that I could do the same thing in video.

He often places himself in the environment of Istanbul in the short videos. He sees them as a way to bring a street performance into people’s houses via their computer screens.

Doruk Kumkumoğlu, 'Kodlama: Sadettin Bilal Savaş', 2016, Temporal Perspectives Projector, PC, Kinect Sensor, projection plane with specific dimensions 150 x 300 cm. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Doruk Kumkumoğlu, ‘Kodlama: Sadettin Bilal Savaş’, 2016, Temporal Perspectives
Projector, PC, Kinect Sensor, projection plane with specific dimensions, 150 x 300 cm. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Born in 1982 in Ankara, Fırat Engin’s work principally encompasses installation, video and sculpture. He first studied sculpture at Hacettepe University and has since undertaken Masters and PhD degrees. He also studied at Ecole Nationale Supéerieure D′Art de Bourges in Paris. Engin co-founded the Kitschen Contemporary Art Initiative with Ekin Kılıç and Elif Varol Ergen. Engin has been exhibiting widely since 2002 in Turkey and abroad.

Fırat Engin, 'Sultans of Art', 2016, Yatagan Steel, Brass, Wood, Laser etched text 150cm Sword -Table with Display Case. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Fırat Engin, ‘Sultans of Art’, 2016, Yatagan steel, brass, wood, laser etched text, 150 cm sword, table with display case. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

As part of the exhibition Engin presents the work Sultans of Art, a newly produced Ottoman Sultan Sword engraved with more than 103 names. The names came from Istanbul Art News’s journal supply called “Hundreds of Art” published in February 2016.

Ardan Özmenoğlu, 'are we?', 2016, tin plated copper pot, lid, orange neon light, 30 x 40 x 25cm. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Ardan Özmenoğlu, ‘are we?’, 2016, tin plated copper pot, lid, orange neon light, 30 x 40 x 25cm. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Ardan Özmenoğlu works in a number of media such as large-scale glass sculptures, works on Post-It notes and neon lighting. She has been exhibited in over 40 exhibitions in the United States, Istanbul, Berlin and Croatia.

Ardan Özmenoğlu, 'Beauty Bubbles', 2016, mixed media on post-it, 190 x 200 x 5 cm. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

Ardan Özmenoğlu, ‘Beauty Bubbles’, 2016, mixed media on post-it, 190 x 200 x 5 cm. Image courtesy Akbank Sanat.

In her playful work, Özmenoğlu adheres hundreds of Post-It notes to canvases, which she then silk-screens with colourful, pop-inspired imagery to create a three-dimensional surface. Her works encourage viewers to reconsider familiar images, products and ideas. She presents opposing ideas such as the past and the present, art history and contemporary art trends, creativity and consumerism, repetition and individuality, the whole and the fragmented. She merges the old art of printing with glitzy colours and contemporary images, thereby casting everyday objects in a new light.

Claire Wilson

1427

Related topics: Turkish artists, emerging artists, installation, events in Istanbul, gallery shows

Related posts:

Subscribe to Art Radar for more on contemporary art from Turkey

Save

Save

Save

Comments are closed.