Dia Art Foundation expands collection with Kishio Suga and Lee Ufan works

Dia Art Foundation have announced the addition of important works by Japanese artist Kishio Suga and Korea’s Lee Ufan to their collection.

With the work of key members of the Japanese Mono-ha movement of the 1960s, the acquisition introduces art from this period to the Foundation’s permanent collection.

Dia:Beacon, Riggio Galleries. Beacon, New York. © Dia Art Foundation, New York. Photo: Bill Jacobson Studio, New York. Image courtesy Dia Art Foundation, New York.

Dia:Beacon, Riggio Galleries. Beacon, New York. © Dia Art Foundation, New York. Photo: Bill Jacobson Studio, New York. Image courtesy Dia Art Foundation, New York.

Based in New York and founded in 1974, Dia Art Foundation is a nonprofit organisation that was established to initiate, support, present and preserve specific art projects. Dia presents exhibitions, installations, performances and lectures at its site in New York on West 22nd Street, as well as maintaining several long-term sites including Walter De Maria’s The New York Earth Room (1977) and Joseph Beuys’s 7000 Eichen (7000 Oaks) (1982). 

Since it was established, the Foundation has grown its permanent collection, with artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Agnes Martin and Bruce Nauman. The collection holds a number of artists from the 1960s and 1970s, on view at Dia:Beacon, which opened in the Hudson Valley in 2003.

The news on the latest acquisitions was announced on Monday 10 July 2017. The Foundation’s Director Jessica Morgan comments:

Since arriving at Dia, I have had a strong desire to deepen the institution’s commitment to reflect a greater understanding of the seminal work that was being made internationally during the period that Dia has championed. The addition of Lee Ufan and Kishio Suga to Dia’s collection was a natural progression for our foundation. Both artists were contributing to parallel conversations around Minimalism and Postminimalism in the 1960s and 1970s, and are still developing their resonant and influential practices today.

Dia:Chelsea, 535 West 22nd Street, New York City. © Dia Art Foundation, New York. Photo: Don Stahl. Image courtesy Dia Art Foundation, New York.

Dia:Chelsea, 535 West 22nd Street, New York City. © Dia Art Foundation, New York. Photo: Don Stahl. Image courtesy Dia Art Foundation, New York.

The pioneering Mono-ha movement, or the ‘School of Things’, focused on natural and manmade materials in a similar way to movements such as Arte Povera, Land art and Minimalism, already represented within Dia’s collection. The movement saw artists reject traditional forms of representation, instead bringing together unaltered ‘things’ and focusing on the material itself. The addition of these key figures of the Japanese movement will allow parallels to be drawn between these other historically connected yet distinct movements that also developed in the 1960s.

Korean artist Lee Ufan was one of the leading figures in Mono-ha, exploring the properties of different materials in his work. Three of his works will be joining the collection, including Relatum (formerly System, 1969) and Relatum (formerly Language, 1971). These pieces ask visitors to consider the presence and function of the materials; in the former work, Ufan believes “that the arrangement of steel can result in many different effects for viewers, defying the perception that steel is an inorganic or lifeless object”. Dia will present these works at Dia:Beacon in spring 2018.

Dia will also be acquiring five works by Japanese artist Kishio Suga that span his artistic practice. They explain how his installations “highlight both the internal qualities of a given substance (such as mass, structure, and weight) and the external forces acting on it (such as gravity, humidity, and time)”. Two of these works are currently on view at Dia:Chelsea until 29 July 2017 as part of an exhibition on the artist.

Anna Jamieson

1770

Related Topics: newsvenues – New YorkKorean artistsJapanese artistsinstallationmuseum shows

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