Preview: highlights at Frieze London 2017

Art Radar highlights some global art to seek out at Frieze London 2017.

Frieze art fair will run in London from 5 to 8 October 2017 at Regent’s Park.

Reza Aramesh, 'Metamorphosis - a study in liberation', 2017, Leila Heller Galler.Frieze Sculpture 2017. Photo: Stephen White. Image courtesy Stephen White/Frieze.

Reza Aramesh, ‘Metamorphosis – A Study in Liberation’, 2017, Leila Heller Galler. Frieze Sculpture 2017. Photo: Stephen White. Image courtesy Stephen White/Frieze.

Frieze has established itself as a leading global art event where curators and collectors can feel the pulse of new and classic art from over 160 international commercial galleries. The period of London’s Frieze Art Fair in October is a magnet for international galleries, artists and collectors. Frieze now takes place concurrently with its own sister fair Frieze Masters, showcasing art from the ancient era and Old Masters to the late 20th century. Beside these fairs both in  London’s Regent’s Park, two other independent fairs take place in the same week: SUNDAY at Ambika P3, focusing on emerging galleries and 1:54 at Somerset House, bringing contemporary African art to the city.

Takuro Kuwata, Untitled and Untitled, both 2016, Alison Jacques Gallery / Salon 94. Frieze Sculpture 2017. Photo: Stephen White. Image courtesy Stephen White/Frieze.

Takuro Kuwata, ‘Untitled’ and ‘Untitled’, 2016, Alison Jacques Gallery / Salon 94. Frieze Sculpture 2017. Photo: Stephen White. Image courtesy Stephen White/Frieze.

Regents Park hosts a free open air sculpture exhibition Frieze Sculpture 2017 alongside the fair, and this year it includes the work of Reza Aramesh and Takuro Kuwata. A curated non-profit programme of artist commissions, films and talks, complements Frieze. The talks programme includes a contribution from Angolan artist Nástio Mosquito speaking on “alternative facts”. The Special Projects include Johannesburg-based multimedia artist Donna Kukama, working at the “border between fiction and reality”. She was the winner of the Standard Bank Young Artist Award for Performance Art. Her project will involve participation and interaction with a display of medicinal plants outside the fair. Kukama’s work will also feature in the display of Cape Town-based Blank gallery.

Nástio Mosquito in a still from his video installation '3 Continents', 2010. Image courtesy the artist.

Nástio Mosquito in a still from his video installation ‘3 Continents’, 2010. Image courtesy the artist.

Donna Kukama, 'Mass Action Strike!', 2009, performance at Johannesburg Art Gallery. Image courtesy the artist.

Donna Kukama, ‘Mass Action Strike!’, 2009, performance at Johannesburg Art Gallery. Image courtesy the artist.

Korean artists duo Moon Kyungwon & Jeon Joonho’s special project will use film and photography to evoke the story of Daesung, known as ‘Freedom Village’, an isolated farming community in the highly charged Demilitarized Zone between North and South Korea. The Frieze Artist Award winner, Angolan artist Kiluanji Kia Henda, will present a project entitled Under the Silent Eye of Lenin that connects traditional Bakongo cultures of witchcraft with Marxism-Leninism in post-independence Angola.

Art radar previews the main galleries to seek out in order to see global artists from Asia, Africa and the Middle East at this year’s fair.

Liang Shaoji, 'Snow in the Woods', 2016. Image courtesy the artist and ShanghART.

Liang Shaoji, ‘Snow in the Woods’, 2016. Image courtesy the artist and ShanghART.

Frieze London highlights

1. From Asia-Pacific and Middle Eastern Galleries

ShanghART (booth A13) will present a suite of works using silkworms and their threads as a medium by Liang Shaoji. The Chinese artist’s poetic meditations on the passing of time and the nature of life have recently become charged with political undertones. Liang has lived for almost thirty years in a temple on Mount Tiantai in central Zhejiang Province, leading a simple life, reading, meditating and searching for spiritual enlightenment while devoting himself to breading silkworms. The worms have become his artistic collaborators, enveloping resonant objects in their threads.

Cheng Xinyi, 'Pomegranate', 2017. © Image courtesey Galerie Balice Hertling. Photo: Aurélien Mole.

Cheng Xinyi, ‘Pomegranate’, 2017. Photo: Aurélien Mole. Image courtesy Galerie Balice Hertling.

Antenna Space (booth H17) from Shanghai will feature the work of Cheng Xinyi. Cheng’s recent figurative paintings often depict hirsute white males. In an interview for SinoVision she comments that  “Body hair is where there is the smell of the hormones. It’s defiantly a really sexual thing.” The works have strong colour that can convey a range of emotional states. She says:

Every situation carries a specific kind of emotion. These emotional situations also associate with a specific kind of colour pallet.

Agatha Gothe-Snape, 'Every Future Here Now', 2015, seven conversation and large-scale drawings, Carriageworks. Image courtesy and © the artist.

Agatha Gothe-Snape, ‘Every Future Here Now’, 2015, seven conversation and large-scale drawings, Carriageworks. Image courtesy Carriageworks and the artist.

The sole gallery from Australia is The Commercial. They will be presenting Agatha Gothe-Snape, the multimedia artist who had a solo show entitled “Oh Window” at the Mori Art Museum in Tokyo earlier in the year. Her work grows from performance and Powerpoint presentations. She comments: “I’m confused about contemporary art and I want to think about it in a systematic way over a long period of time.”

Hong Kong gallery Lehmann Maupin (booth A3) features Nicholas Hlobo, Shirazeh Houshiary, Liza Lou and Do Ho Suh.

Lee Bul, 'Untitled (Willing To Be Vulnerable - Velvet #7 DDRG13RB)', 2017, mother of pearl, acrylic paint, acrylic panel, dried flower, pearl-printed self adhesive sheet, and collage on silk velvet, 41.26 x 54.72 x 3.66 in (framed), 104.8 x 139 x 9.3 cm. Image courtesy Studio Lee Bul and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong.

Lee Bul, ‘Untitled (Willing To Be Vulnerable – Velvet #7 DDRG13RB)’, 2017, mother of pearl, acrylic paint, acrylic panel, dried flower, pearl-printed self adhesive sheet, and collage on silk velvet, 41.26 x 54.72 x 3.66 in (framed), 104.8 x 139 x 9.3 cm. Image courtesy Studio Lee Bul and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong.

Kukje Gallery (boothB14) from Seoul feature Lee Ufan, Haegue Yang, Kim Yong-Ik, Gimhongsok, Ha Chong-Hyun and Park Seo-Bo. Also from Seoul, Gallery Hyundai who have a stand at Frieze Masters aswell, will bring works by Chung Sang-Hwa, Seung-taek Lee, Lee Kun-Yong, Minjung Kim and Duck Jun Kwak.

Mumbai’s Project 88 (booth G26) bring works by Amitesh Shrivastava, Hemali Bhuta, Huma Mulji, Neha Choksi, Raqs Media Collective, Sandeep Mukherjee, Shumon Ahmed.

Dubai-based The Third Line (booth G4) will show works by Abbas Akhavan, Amir H. Fallah, Hayv Kahraman, Laleh Khorramian and Sara Naim.

Taha Belal, 'I'm Not Obliged to Do This', 2017. Image courtesy and © the artist and Gypsum Gallery.

Taha Belal, ‘I’m Not Obliged to Do This’, 2017. Image courtesy and © the artist and Gypsum Gallery.

7. From African Galleries

Gypsum (booth H26), a Cairo-based gallery, are new to the Frieze fair. They will be bringing a highly anticipated selection of works by Beirut-based Tamara Al Samerraei. Anxious and sometimes darkly humorous the works blur boundaries between documentary and narrative, as well as between painting and photography. Cairo- and Basel-based Basim Magdy will also show work deploying satire to evoke a luminous but absurd world. Egyptian artist Taha Belal will show discrete sculptures continuing his formal investigation of objects, images and surfaces from our daily life. Belal’s delicate composites feel simultaneously familiar and unknown.

The fair hosts a range of galleries based in South Africa. Blank (booth H24) from Cape Town are making their first appearance at the Fair alongside Frieze veterans Stevenson (booth G5) and Goodman (booth B12) galleries. Look out for the witty posed photographs of Angolan Kiluanji Kia Henda and Moroccan Mounir Fatmi’s stark objects and videos.

Mounir Fatmi’s exhibition "Fragmented Memory" at Goodman Gallery. Installation view with (left) 'Mother Language', 2017 and (right) 'Across the Moon', 2017. Image courtesy Goodman Gallery.

Mounir Fatmi, “Fragmented Memory”, installation view at Goodman Gallery. Installation view with (left) ‘Mother Language’, 2017 and (right) ‘Across the Moon’, 2017. Image courtesy Goodman Gallery.

9. Global galleries

Sicily-based Laveronica Arte Contemporanea (booth H5) will display a solo presentation by Pakistani-born, US-based Maryam Jafri. Jafri’s multimedia work touches on a bewildering range of subjects from alternative healing systems, such as acupuncture, cupping and yoga, to the export market for S/M role play accessories. Behind the subjects lies a consistent enquiry into the role of subcultural artefacts in international commerce and the formation of national narratives.

Pace gallery (booth B4) will feature the witty articulated windows of Chinese artist Song Dong and the subtle monochrome works of Indian-born Prabhavathi Meppayil alongside Japanese collective teamLab‘s spectacular digital work Dark Waves (2016).

Maryam Jafri, 'Welcome to My Age of Anxiety', installation view at Laveronica arte contemporanea, 'Modica with Self-care', 2017. Image courtesy the artist and Laveronica arte contemporanea.

Maryam Jafri, ‘Welcome to My Age of Anxiety’, installation view at Laveronica arte contemporanea, Modica, 2017. Image courtesy the artist and Laveronica arte contemporanea.

Galerie Krinzinger (booth A6) will include Saudi artist Maha Malluh’s Food for Thought – Assabeel (Food for Thought 9000 series) (2012) a monumental work made out of cassette tapes and wooden baking trays.

Other global galleries spotlighting international artists include Perrotin (booth A17), Sommer Contemporary Art (booth G2) and Sfeir-Semler (booth G9). P.P.O.W (booth B18) will include the work of Vietnamese artist Dinh Q Lê, including his sculpture I Am Large, I Contain Multitudes (2017). It takes the form of a bicycle, bedecked with multiple rear view mirrors and suggests people’s resilience, expressed in building their own informal urban systems.

Dinh Q. Lê, 'I am Large, I Contain Multitudes', 2009. Image courtesy the artist and PPOW gallery.

Dinh Q. Lê, ‘I am Large, I Contain Multitudes’, 2009. Image courtesy the artist and PPOW gallery.

From Frieze Masters

Boers-Li Gallery from Beijing will spotlight the work of Huang Rui. A founding member of the Chinese avant-garde art group the ‘Stars’, he has been vocal about his belief in the importance of free expression. His work is characterised by simple colour and symmetry.

Gallery Hyundai from Seoul feature the veteran Avant-Garde artist Lee Kun-Yong whose work is often produced from the traces left by his body in performance actions.

Song Dong, 'Doing Nothing Doing Debris 012', 2014. © the artist © Pace Gallery.

Song Dong, ‘Doing Nothing Doing Debris 012’, 2014. Image courtesy the artist and Pace Gallery. © the artist and Pace Gallery.

Galleria Massimo Minini from Brescia, Italy, show work by the architect Shusaku Arakawa (1936 – 2010) who with his wife and collaborator Madeline Gins developed the theory of “procedural architecture” and created buildings that they felt would prolong the lives of those who inhabited them, encouraging the visitor to build a “perpetually tentative relationship with their surroundings”.

Anne Mosseri-Marlio Galerie feature the work of Chinese-born Onoda Minoru (1937 – 2008), an important member of the Japanese Abstract Expressionist Gutai Group.

Andrew Stooke

1880

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