Preview: 5 must-see events at Hong Kong’s South Island Art Day 2017

The biannual art festival in Hong Kong’s burgeoning art district is back again this October.

Art Radar highlights 5 must-see events among the varied programme brought by 16 participating galleries and artist studios on 14 October 2017.

 “Tale of the Wonderland”, 2017, installation view at Blindspot Gallery. Image courtesy Blindspot Gallery.

“Tale of the Wonderland”, 2017, installation view at Blindspot Gallery. Image courtesy Blindspot Gallery.

For the past four years, the South Island Cultural District (SICD) has organised the biannual festival in the areas of Wong Chuk Hang and Tin Wan, marking the rise of a new art district in Hong Kong.

The upcoming edition of South Island Art Day will be held on 14 October 2017. The programme includes exhibition openings, art performances, artist talks and guided tours. A kids corner is also provided to encourage families to experience contemporary art. The event is free of charge, and 16 galleries and artist studios will open their doors to the public from 12pm to 8pm.

Photo of the previous edition of South Island Art Day. Image courtesy South Island Cultural District.

Photo of the previous edition of South Island Art Day. Image courtesy South Island Cultural District.

Founded in 2013, the South Island Cultural District (SICD) is formed by 21 galleries and art spaces in the industrial district in the southern part of Hong Kong. The event aims to promote and raise awareness about the new development in Hong Kong’s art scene.

Art Radar highlights 5 events to see during South Island Art Day.

Lin Jingjing, 'We Are Free to Choose but We are Not Free From the Consequences of Our Choices: Departure Board', 2017, LED display panels, acrylic, aluminium-plastic panel, 200 x 200 cm. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe gallery.

Lin Jingjing, ‘We Are Free to Choose but We are Not Free From the Consequences of Our Choices: Departure Board’, 2017, LED display panels, acrylic, aluminium-plastic panel, 200 x 200 cm. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

1. “Lin Jingjing – Take Off” — de Sarthe Gallery

The last day of the current exhibition at de Sarthe Gallery happens to be on South Island Art Day – 14 October. Be sure to catch the solo show of Beijing- and New York-based multimedia artist Lin Jingjing before it ends. The exhibition reveals the anxieties faced by society in the contemporary setting, in which people loose their individuality.

Based on French anthropologist Marc Augé’s theory, the artist stages an installation which transforms the gallery space into an international airport. She explores the notion of “Non-Place” in this work and highlights the insignificance of people’s identity in such circumstance. The artist also creates works that bring to the fore contemporary society’s worries about privacy, commercial interests and helplessness.

“Tale of the Wonderland”, 2017, installation view at Blindspot Gallery. Image courtesy Blindspot Gallery.

“Tale of the Wonderland”, 2017, installation view at Blindspot Gallery. Image courtesy Blindspot Gallery.

2. “Tale of the Wonderland” — Blindspot Gallery

Based on Lewis Carroll’s Victorian novel Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland published in the 19th century, the group exhibition at Blindspot Gallery generates a dialogue about post-colonial Hong Kong. For 20 years since the end of the British rule, Hong Kong has been attempting to grasp its position and identity amidst uncertainty. The exhibition is divided into eight chapters, each represented by a local artist:

● “White Glove” (Sarah Lai)
● “The Rabbit Hole” (Lam Tung Pang)
● “Drink Me” (South Ho Siu Nam)
● “Who in the World am I” (Isaac Chong Wai)
● “Pool of Tears” (Leung Chi Wo)
● “Alice’s Adventures” (Amy Cheung)
● “White Rose Red” (Chow Chun Fai)
● “Books – A Speechless Goodbye” (Pak Sheung Chuen)

The multimedia show includes paintings, videos, performance and installation. Together, the artists reflects on the socio-political and historical issues within the city.

"John Batten x Ha Bik Chuen Archive", 2017, installation view at Spring Workshop. Image courtesy Spring Workshop.

“John Batten x Ha Bik Chuen Archive”, 2017, installation view at Spring Workshop. Image courtesy Spring Workshop.

3. “John Batten x Ha Bik Chuen Archive” — Spring Workshop

Spring Workshop revisits a project that was held in 2014 – the digitalisation of Hong Kong artist Ha Bik Chuen‘s (1925-2009) archive by Asia Art Archive. Opening on South Island Art Day this October, the exhibition held at Spring Workshop is a collaboration with art critic John Batten. The display commemorates Ha’s works, including blueprints, designs, scrapbooks and diaries.

Primarily recognised as a printmaker and sculptor, Ha amassed a vast collection of historically significant materials, such as magazines, which documented Hong Kong’s art scene. The artist has photographed many exhibitions and the everyday life since the 1960s. His collage books are part of the collection.

The public is welcome to discover Hong Kong’s art history though Ha’s practice in this exhibition.

“Liu Di: Break with Convention”, 2017, installation view at Pekin Fine Arts. Image courtesy Pekin Fine Arts.

“Liu Di: Break with Convention”, 2017, installation view at Pekin Fine Arts. Image courtesy Pekin Fine Arts.

4. “Liu Di: Break with Convention” — Pékin Fine Arts

Chinese artist Liu Di (b. 1985, Shanxi) creates 3D digital videos and photographs that explore the paradox between nature and the man-made. China has experienced exponantial economic growth in the recent years, and urbanisation has led to tensions between nature and human society. Against the backdrop of the urban landscape, the protagonists in his work interact with these spaces in a fantasical manner, blending science fiction with real life. He injects a sense of humor in his work, and often situates oversized animal figures in distorted forms amongst dense buildings.

The solo show at Pékin Fine Arts, Hong Kong, is his first the city. The artist comments:

The appearance of huge animals points to the unreliability of common sense, showing the flaws in how we perceive the world.

“Leang Seckon: When Head and Body Unite”, 2017, installation view at Rossi & Rossi. Image courtesy Rossi & Rossi.

“Leang Seckon: When Head and Body Unite”, 2017, installation view at Rossi & Rossi. Image courtesy Rossi & Rossi.

5. “Leang Seckon: When Head and Body Unite” — Rossi and Rossi

Cambodian artist Leang Seckon’s solo exhibition at Rossi and Rossi features works made of textiles, found objects, photography and posters. His work is the amalgam of traditional folklore imagery and contemporary popular culture. The references to history is prevalent in the works in this exhibition.

The exhibition, entitled “When Head and Body Unite”, addresses the recent incident of ancient stone statuary being repatriated to Cambodia. The artist draws connections between war in ancient times, folk stories and the improving economy in Cambodia.

Valencia Tong

1899

Related Topics: Asia expands, promoting art, gallery shows, festivals, events in Hong Kong

Related Posts:

Subscribe to Art Radar for more updates about Hong Kong’s arts and culture scene

Comments are closed.