“Reversal Ritual”: inaugural group exhibition at de Sarthe Gallery’s new Hong Kong space

“Reversal Ritual” addresses the concept of “carnivalesque” developed by 20th century literary critic Mikhail Bakhtin.

The group exhibition, organised by Gallery Directors Willem Molesworth and Vincent de Sarthe, features multiple site-specific installations as well as participatory artwork.

"Reversal Ritual", 23 March - 13 May 2017, de Sarthe Gallery, Hong Kong. Installation view. Image courtesy de Sarthe Gallery.

“Reversal Ritual”, 23 March – 13 May 2017, de Sarthe Gallery, Hong Kong. Installation view. Image courtesy de Sarthe Gallery.

de Sarthe Gallery unveils its new 10,000-square-feet gallery space in the burgeoning art district of Wong Chuk Hang in the Southern part of Hong Kong. Located on the entire 20th floor in the Global Trade Square building, “Reversal Ritual”, the inaugural group exhibition of five emerging mainland Chinese and Hong Kong artists, is on view from 23 March to 13 May 2017.

Gallery Directors Willem Molesworth and Vincent de Sarthe organised the exhibition to inaugurate the new Hong Kong space. The artists whose works are shown in the exhibition are Liang Ban, Mak Ying Tung, Tong Kunniao, Wang Xin and Xin Yunpeng.

To celebrate the opening of the new space, which coincided with Art Basel Hong Kong, de Sarthe Gallery held a party on 22 March named “Hack Lunacy”. It was hosted by Asian Dope Boys founded by artist Chen Tianzhuo, featuring music by Tzusing (Taiwan), and live performances by Kimchi Princi (Australia) and Justin Shoulder (Australia).

Xin Yunpeng, '20140128', 2014, fibreglass, wood, metal, motor, mixed media (2 parts), 225 x 100 x 100 cm each. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

Xin Yunpeng, ‘20140128’, 2014, fibreglass, wood, metal, motor, mixed media (2 parts), 225 x 100 x 100 cm each. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

Literary Critic Mikhail Bakhtin’s Notion of “Carnivalesque”

The concept of “carnivalesque”, developed by 20th century Russian literary critic Mikhail Bakhtin, is explored in the show. Bakhtin references the comically festive events depicted by 16th century novelist François Rabelais, stating that the carnival was an expression of an alternative world liberated from the social, political, cultural and religious structures of the time. “Reversal Ritual” embraces the utopian tone of the “carnivalesque” concept, celebrating the transitory possibility of change when faced with repressed forms of power. As seen in the works of art by the artists in the exhibition, artists use a “carnivalesque” approach to express themselves in the newly established order of Chinese society.

Mak Ying Tung, 'You Better Watch Out', 2017, sponge balls, PVC plastic, inflatable snow globes, 218 x 330 x 260 cm. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

Mak Ying Tung, ‘You Better Watch Out’, 2017, sponge balls, PVC plastic, inflatable snow globes, 218 x 330 x 260 cm. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

The first piece of work near the entrance is Mak Ying Tung’s You Better Watch Out (2017). In the kinetic work, colourful sponge balls spin around in a giant snowglobe-like transparent sphere. Among the piles of sponge balls near the bottom, pieces of paper with QR codes are embedded within. Curious viewers are tempted to scan the codes with their smartphones. Once scanned, the QR codes bring viewers to a live-stream video of themselves looking at their phones, standing in front of the artwork. This installation contemplates not only everyday objects and materials, but highlights the troubling duality between contemporary modes of entertainment and the growth of surveillance states across the globe.

Wang Xin, 'Artists Can Tell', 2016, table, chairs, signboard, LED lights, custom bottles, Kool Aid, vodka, 240 x 210 x 210 cm. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

Wang Xin, ‘Artists Can Tell’, 2016, table, chairs, signboard, LED lights, custom bottles, Kool Aid, vodka, 240 x 210 x 210 cm. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

Questioning the art world through participatory work

In Wang Xin’s work Artists Can Tell (2016), a bar installation is set up, featuring an interactive performance by the artist. Artists other than Wang Xin are also invited to perform, acting as bartenders and serving visitors with a selection of 30 different bottles. Each bottle has a satirical label attached, showcasing different aspects of the art world, such as “How galleries choose artists,” “How to network at an art fair” and “What makes artists special.” The piece contemplates the existence and significance of the art world today, and asks:

Is the relationship between artists and art lover the same as the relationship between bartender and bar-goer?

Mak Ying Tung, 'Sound of Music', 2017, video, audio set, red drape, lights, stage, dimensions variable. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

Mak Ying Tung, ‘Sound of Music’, 2017, video, audio set, red drape, lights, stage, dimensions variable. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

Kitsch and parody

The parody continues in Hong Kong artist Mak Ying Tung’s piece Sound of Music (2017). The set up looks as if it were a Chinese restaurant in which a Karaoke session is happening. The viewers are invited to sing Karaoke parodies of iconic Canto-pop and Christmas songs. In the television screen on the bottom left corner, kitschy videos in Karaoke style are played, showing English lyrics which challenge the status quo of contemporary artists and the current art ecosystem.

The Karaoke videos include How to Position Myself in Hierarchy of Art (4 min 6 sec) showcasing a horse rider finding his direction; I Am Not An Artist and I Am An Artist (3 min 43 sec) featuring an aerial view of a river in a forest; Art Art Art (1 min 59 sec) in which the interior of a museum acts as a background to repetition of the word “art” as lyrics; and Who Doesn’t Like Galleries (4 min 23 sec) showcasing an idyllic view of the ocean as the background.

The idiosyncratic use of kitschy fonts and lyrics highlights the enigma of the art world and the powerlessness it invokes in many contemporary artists worldwide.

Tong Kunniao, 'When You Do It, Leave Some of the Pig Ass', 2015, cutting board, tambourine, motor, silicone, 30 x 40 x 60 cm. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

Tong Kunniao, ‘When You Do It, Leave Some of the Pig Ass’, 2015, cutting board, tambourine, motor, silicone, 30 x 40 x 60 cm. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

Tong Kunniao, 'When You Do It, Leave Some of the Pig Ass', 2015, cutting board, tambourine, motor, silicone, 30 x 40 x 60 cm. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

Tong Kunniao, ‘When You Do It, Leave Some of the Pig Ass’, 2015, cutting board, tambourine, motor, silicone, 30 x 40 x 60 cm. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

Whimsical kinetic art

Further eccentricities are shown in Tong Kunniao’s noisy kinetic work When You Do it, Leave Some of the Pig Ass (2015). For most of the time, the work remains silent and motionless. However, as viewers walk close to the work, sensors activate the motors, causing the silicone “pigtails” to wobble, spin and whip against the tambourines. A chaotic scene occurs as confused viewers watch multiple tambourines emit sound in an absurd and disorienting manner.

 Tong Kunniao, 'When You Do It, Leave Some of the Pig Ass', 2015, cutting board, tambourine, motor, silicone, 30 x 40 x 60 cm. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

Tong Kunniao, ‘When You Do It, Leave Some of the Pig Ass’, 2015, cutting board, tambourine, motor, silicone, 30 x 40 x 60 cm. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

Xin Yunpeng, '20140128', 2014, fibreglass, wood, metal, motor, mixed media (2 parts), 225 x 100 x 100 cm each. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

Xin Yunpeng, ‘20140128’, 2014, fibreglass, wood, metal, motor, mixed media (2 parts), 225 x 100 x 100 cm each. Image courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery.

House of mirrors

In a separated space full of mirrored walls in the gallery, Xin Yunpeng’s work 20140128 (2014) features slowly spinning statues, which depict cowboys pointing a gun towards the front, as if threatening to shoot. The mirror reflection on the walls causes a confusing sensation as viewers see multiple cowboy statuettes aiming a gun at them from various angles.

Valencia Tong

1645

Related Topics: Chinese artists, Hong Kong artists, interactive art, installation, gallery shows, events in Hong Kong

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Farmers’ lives matter: Prabhakar Pachpute on “Shadows on Arrival” at Kolkata’s Experimenter – interview

Prabhakar Pachpute’s exhibition “Shadows on Arrival” sketches gloomy lunar landscapes at Kolkata-based gallery Experimenter.

Prabhakar Pachpute talks to Art Radar about his solo show at Experimenter, on view until 29 April 2017.

Prabhakar Pachpute, "Shadows on Arrival", 4 March - 29 April 2017, installation at Experimenter, Kolkata. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Prabhakar Pachpute, “Shadows on Arrival”, 4 March – 29 April 2017, installation at Experimenter, Kolkata. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

A 2014 public survey conducted by the India’s National Crime Record Bureau (NCRB) revealed that the Maharashtra State scored the highest number of suicides among the farmers community, mainly due to crop failures and bankruptcy and indebtedness for cultivation loan. According to The Times of India in an article published in March 2015,

Official say the state is facing a potent combination of three types of drought. “The poor rain points to meteorological drought, ground water depletion signals hydrological drought. And the drop in yield means we have agricultural drought as well […].

While worrisome issues of climate change draw the attention of both celebrities and common people around the globe, in Maharashtra districts of Chandrapur, Yavatmal and Nagpur there is an ever growing trend to transform farmlands into coal mines. According to prominent Indian environmentalist Vandana Shiva,

If non-sustainable land and water use continue, the drought will spread even when rainfall is normal. The most vulnerable immediately are the poor who will be forced to migrate as environmental refugees. Agrarian distress and farmers` suicides will increase because farmers have spent huge amounts on costly seeds and chemicals, and crop failure will make the debt trap a death trap […].

Prabhakar Pachpute, 'The Enigma of Arrival', 2017, gypsum and epoxy. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Prabhakar Pachpute, ‘The Enigma of Arrival’, 2017, gypsum and epoxy. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Chandrapur-born artist Prabhakar Pachpute reflects on the vicious circle of temporary wealth assured by coal mining projects and permanent soil depletion caused by mineral extraction. He does so through a body of work that is deeply inspired by Greek-Italian Giorgio de Chirico’s Metaphisical Art for the matte palette he uses, the presence of lonely characters, elongated figures and shadows wandering in timeless landscapes, thus dragging visitors into a dreamlike atmosphere burdened by a feeling of desolation, displacement and abandonment. Pachpute’s research on coal miners spans over the last decade and tells the story of a luxuriant land wrecked by the greediness of men, the story of a family oppressed by the burden of black gold, and the fight for a change by uniting to those voices in the state that claim respect for India’s natural resources, habitat and people’s life.

Art Radar talks to the Pune-based artist about his research on view in “Shadows on Arrival” at Kolkata’s Experimenter until 29 April 2017.

Prabhakar Pachpute, 'Under the Crust', 2017, led light, gypsum sculpture on gypsum plinth. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Prabhakar Pachpute, ‘Under the Crust’, 2017, led light, gypsum sculpture on gypsum plinth and charcoal drawing. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

I would like to start with a question about your artistic research before 2011, when you decided to address your interest to the precarious lives of miners. May I ask you what was the focus of your investigation before? And, how did this evolve to the aggressive exploitation of land?

Before my interest and focus were about my surroundings (daily life subjects), proverbs, references from the history of art and Marathi literature. I was very much interested in using proverbs, which are universal and very much contemporary. Such as some of my previous works that have references to Pieter Bruegel’s painting Neterlandish Proverbs. I have made some works with the proverbs, which have a connection to the contemporary scenario. 

I have started working and researching on the mining since 2010-11, while I was doing my post graduation at the Faculty of Fine Arts M. S. University of Baroda. There were two incidents that made me think about the miners’ life: one is the Chilean coal mining disaster (2010) and the second is one of the accidents in my hometown. There were several accidents that have not been covered by any media. Since then, I started looking back to my own background and mining history of the place.

I moved to Bombay in 2011. In 2012, I had a first solo exhibition at Clark House Initiative called “Canary in a Coal Mine”, which was about all my memories and stories that I used to hear about the mining in my hometown, and also about the displacement of the people and farming land. This exhibition brought me a lot of opportunities, and slowly I have started travelling and researching about the different kinds of mining in India and abroad. I have realised it is one of the most vast subjects to work or research. Whenever I have an opportunity to travel I propose to do a research trip to the mines.

That’s how I could visit different kinds of mines such as: Lignite mining in Castelnuovo dei Sabbioni, Italy, 2013; Marble mining in Carrara, Italy, 2013; Iron mining in Pará state, Brazil, 2014; Gold mining in Ouro Preto and Serra Pelada, Brazil, 2014; Salt mining in Çankiri, Turkey, 2015; Coal mining in Wales and Ruhr valley, Germany, 2015; Western coalfields Limited (WCL) Chandrapur, Balharshah area, Maharashtra, 2010, 2013 and 2014; Pathakhera coal mines, Madhya Pradesh, India, 2015; Gold mining in Marmato, Colombia, 2016; Salt Mining and Coal mining (musems of the minings), Upper Seilesia, Poland, 2016 (in collaboration with Rupali Patil).

Prabhakar Pachpute, 'Under the Crust' (detail), 2017, led light, gypsum sculpture on gypsum plinth. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Prabhakar Pachpute, ‘Under the Crust’ (detail), 2017, led light, gypsum sculpture on gypsum plinth. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Could you tell us what are these ‘shadows on arrival’ in the exhibition title referring to?

“Shadows on Arrival” refers to the landscape or an environment of the post-industrial culture also as a comment, “what are we have left with?” It’s about the darkness, emptiness, dehumanisation, ownership, a fear especially about this desert or the ‘Lunar landscape’. I also refer this title to Giorgio De Chirico’s paintings, in which you can see the emptiness, traumatic depth, deep colours, elongated shadows and mysterious feel. After visiting many different kinds of mining I have realised that there are always dark forms or stories behind it. Even if we make it a museum of mining or beautification of such areas, there are always shadows on our arrival.

Prabhakar Pachpute, 'An Unending Grave', 2017, gypsum, plywood, clay, robotic insect. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Prabhakar Pachpute, ‘An Unending Grave’, 2017, gypsum, plywood, clay, robotic insect. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Let us consider the work you presented in the group show “Immateriality in Residue” in 2015, or in the exhibitions “No, It Wasn’t The Locust Cloud” in 2016 and “The Land Eaters” in 2013. Are these chapters of a story you are telling? How do these three exhibitions connect to each other?

Yes, these are like the chapters that I am creating. There is a story line or the link between these three exhibitions. “Land Eaters” (2013) is the first chapter, which was more focusing on the exploitation of the farming land, change of landscape and displacement as well as about the farmers who are thinking about going back to the farm and collectivity. For “Immateriality in Residue” I had created a work with charcoal and pastel on plywood cut out, which was about the man with torch light and magnifying glass, who is looking for the hope in the desert landscape. “No, It Wasn’t The Locust Cloud” is a storyline of the transformation of farming land into industrial landscape, as well as the transformation of farmers into miners, the collective of the poets, farmers and miners, and at the end, the possible transformation of abandoned mining.

There is a common thought between all of these works. On the one hand, there is always destruction or exploitation and on the other hand, there is a hope for better life. In this way, these exhibitions are connected to each other. It’s also related to the similar stories that I heard during my research in different places around the world.

Prabhakar Pachpute, 'Counter Table of the Blackyard', 2017, charcoal and acrylic on canvas, 6.5 ft x 15 ft. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Prabhakar Pachpute, ‘Counter Table of the Blackyard’, 2017, charcoal and acrylic on canvas, 6.5 ft x 15 ft. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Have you ever read Cormac McCarthy’s novel The Road? The cold, dark and grim atmosphere of relentless global environmental catastrophe as described by the author can also be seen in the exhibition “Shadows on Arrival”. Here, the wall drawing, installations and sculptures become props of a movie about death, alienation and desolation. Would you like to comment on this?

Unfortunately, I haven’t read Cormac McCarthy’s novel The Road, but I will definitely read it. Yes, there is similar darkness and grim atmosphere of relentless global environmental [disaster]. And “Shadows on Arrival” can be seen as props of a story/movie/chapter about emptiness, dehumanisation, death, alienation, desolation and a fear of an unending grave.

Prabhakar Pachpute, 'Sorry for the Incovenience', 2017, mixed media objects and wall drawing. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Prabhakar Pachpute, ‘Sorry for the Incovenience’, 2017, mixed media objects and wall drawing. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Could you tell us more about the series of wall installations Sorry for the Inconvenience (2017)?

Actually, this work is a reflection of my recent visit to the mines from Poland and previous other researches. Where I have visited museums of the mining, I was interested in looking at the objects, the machines that have been kept as memories from the mining history and the engagement of the human bodies with them.

I was questioning about the use of these machines and electric objects, how they look different when they are not in use or when they are no more in function. For me, it is like a metaphor that links to the abandoned mining landscapes, which are inoperative.

In this work, I have used some electric found objects, which are not in use, and juxtaposed them with my drawings, characters and site-specific elements.

Prabhakar Pachpute, 'Dead Monument', 2017, gypsum, ceramic, metal, found objects. Image courtesy Exeperimenter, Kolkata.

Prabhakar Pachpute, ‘Dead Monument’, 2017, gypsum, ceramic, metal, found objects. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Since you mainly work with site-specific installations, could you explain to us the relationship between creative process and space?

I began to use the site-specific spaces since 2011-12. For the first time, I used my drawings with site-specific elements as my sculptures at Clark House Initiative, Bombay for the exhibition “Canary in a Coal Mine” (PDF download) in 2012. The creative process starts according to the space that you have and the space always gives the opportunity to explore the possibilities beyond our imagination. Sometimes it can be planned or sometimes it is very spontaneous. Both are related matters. A lot more of my works are site-specific. Many times I don’t prefer to design or prepare the sketches for the work. Sometimes it happens within the time period or the process.

Prabhakar Pachpute, 'Do You See Me', 2017, metal, found object. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Prabhakar Pachpute, ‘Do You See Me’, 2017, metal, found object. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

In your exhibition “No, It Wasn’t The Locust Cloud”, the circular canvas conveyed the positive idea of men being able to re-transform themselves. From the rise of farmer suicides in Maharashtra in 2015 to the NGOs’ activity supporting agriculture in 2016, the beginning of change can be identified by reading the news. Do you feel positive about this?

I guess it is a time that local people should get aware or engage with these issues. As I know, some NGOs and collective/group of people who are engaging with the local issues. I feel positive about it, that at least people would get aware about what is happening in their region. In fact, people know it but they don’t know how to deal with it.

What do you mean by “people know it but they don’t know how to deal with it”?

I mean to say that people are aware about what is happening around them, especially about land exploitation or land acquisition, and also about the health issues. I got to know about it when I made some interviews or just talked with local people in my hometown to know about their views about the mining and its effects on their day to day life. Some of them are really aware about it but they have no options as they are doing mining for a living.

Prabhakar Pachpute, "Shadows on Arrival", 4 March - 29 April 2017, installation at Experimenter, Kolkata. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Prabhakar Pachpute, “Shadows on Arrival”, 4 March – 29 April 2017, installation at Experimenter, Kolkata. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Do you work as an activist in the region?

I don’t think that I work as an activist in the region. Instead, I feel like a ‘spokesman’ or observer and there is a need to speak about these issues. There are some poets in my hometown who are bringing their voices through their poetry and literature with similar concern.

What is the response of the population to such actions?

These people are doing their activities at a very small level in the district of Chandrapur. Publishing their books, through poet conferences or taking some workshops/activities with local people. I have noticed that the people with a very positive way are noticing it and they have really great responses from them. Sometimes people send their response through letters. I feel it is a beginning for change.

Prabhakar Pachpute, "Shadows on Arrival", 4 March - 29 April 2017, installation at Experimenter, Kolkata. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

Prabhakar Pachpute, “Shadows on Arrival”, 4 March – 29 April 2017, installation at Experimenter, Kolkata. Image courtesy Experimenter, Kolkata.

What would you like the audience to take from your body of work?

Most of my work is all about anxiety. I express the stories of the mines as I heard them, and my observation of the relations that exist between the miners or landscape in a style of invented proverbs and metaphorically. The message which I am trying to convey through my art is that I would like the audience to notice that it’s not only about the mine, but it is also related to our daily life, surroundings or future that we will have to face someday. We shall get aware about what is happening around us.

Carmen Stolfi

1638

Related topics: Indian artists, interviews, art and the community, political, social, charcoal, drawing, installation, gallery shows, events inKolkata

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Art internships and opportunities | Para Site, Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (CAMH)… and more

Looking for new career options in the arts? Art Radar Opportunities is an archive of openings in the visual art world. 

Whether you are an artist or an aspiring curator, a market analyst or a scholar, Art Radar Opportunities has listings that will pique your interest. Every week we add new positions suitable for a variety of backgrounds and levels of experience. 

Reader offer! We’re offering free job listings to all of our readers. If you would like to advertise your opportunity to 25,000 visitors a month, fill out our Internships or Opportunities submission form.

New this week!

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INTERNSHIP | Houston | Development Intern | Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (CAMH) – 12 May 2017

The Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (CAMH) seeks a Development Intern for the summer of 2017. The Development Department of the Museum serves to fulfill its mission in fundraising through memberships, special events and openings, providing the public with free educational programming and free entrance to the museum. Interns will fulfill the following duties/responsibilities: administrative help within the department, including: filing of sensitive information; help with organisation and maintenance of donor files; assistance in fundraising and special events mailings, including: assembling donor/member lists; assistance in layout and design of mailings; preparing all materials for mailings, etc. Individual projects as related to intern’s specific interest within the Development will be tailored to fit each intern and will be implemented after the start of the internship, once the intern has decided what they would like to focus on. MORE HERE

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OPEN CALL | New Mexico | Call for Artists | Starry Night Residency Programme – 20 May 2017

The Starry Night Residency Programme provides artists, writers and curators with the opportunity to live and work within a small, creative community. Located in the downtown historic hot springs district of Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, the programme is a place where participants can find quiet solitude and focus on their work. In operation from May through September, residencies are a minimum of 1 week and a maximum of 8 weeks. The residency includes a private, fully furnished apartment with private bathroom and kitchen, shared studio space, and courtyard with gardens, barbecue and campfire area. Emerging artists, writers and arts administrators are encouraged to apply. Participants may apply to bring their partners or a creative team member for the duration of their residency. There is no application fee. MORE HERE

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OPEN CALL | Hong Kong | Call for Curators | Para Site – 31 May 2017

Para Site is pleased to announce the 2017 Workshops for Emerging Curators, alongside Para Site’s annual International Conference, which will take place from 14 to 21 October. In its third succeeding edition, they will work with a group of emerging curators, writers, critics, researchers, and other arts professionals from Hong Kong and abroad, through a series of closed-door workshops, lectures and site-visits. This 8-day programme is designed to provide learning and thinking opportunities, mediated by reputed speakers from Para Site’s International Conference as well as by art practitioners from across Hong Kong’s diverse institutional landscape. The programme provides a laboratory for experimentation, posing fundamental questions and ideas that challenge various models of curatorial practice. It will also offer opportunities for networking and enhance the development of systems meant to nurture the participants’ careers. For the first time, Para Site will offer a limited number of scholarships to support the participation of outstanding young professionals. MORE HERE

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INTERNSHIP | Uruguay | Call for Short Films | Gstaadfilm 2017 – 31 August 2017

Launched in 2004, Gstaadfilm is a festival for short films made by visual artists. It was established to give an opportunity to visual artists working in film to enter into a festival. The festival first ran in Gstaad, in the Swiss Alps, in 2004. In 2015 the organisers decided to ‘move mountains’, bringing the festival on tour. It was staged on a Celtic tour to Ireland, Wales and Scotland, with a final screening in Sweden in 2016. The award ceremony was held in Dublin in November 2015. In 2017 the festival will take place in Montevideo, Uruguay in Mid-November. The festival will be announced internationally and across Switzerland, in all major cities. There is no prescriptive theme and any visual material submitted can run for no longer than 10 minutes. Animated cartoons are not accepted. MORE HERE

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Did you know that Art Radar runs its very own online art writing course? Click here to find out more about Art Radar‘s Diploma in Art Journalism & Writing.

Looking for more opportunities in the contemporary art world? For Art Radar’s complete list of jobs, internships, residencies, courses and open calls, click here.

Closing this week!

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INTERNSHIP | London | Gallery Internship | Pippy Houldsworth Gallery – 29 April 2017

Pippy Houldsworth Gallery is offering a 4-6 month full-time internship for a friendly, reliable and motivated arts graduate looking to gain experience working within a contemporary art gallery to start immediately. This is an invaluable opportunity to become part of a vibrant team who thrive on new ideas, creativity and hard work. Ideal candidates should be passionate about contemporary art with a view to working in the arts sector. This is a varied role, with the potential to be adapted to the particular talents and interests of the successful candidate. As part of a small team, there is a need for flexibility and adaptability regarding responsibilities and working hours. The position requires a commitment of 5 days per week, 9.30am – 6pm during weekdays and 11am – 5pm on Saturdays, and will occasionally include additional out of hours for openings and events. The candidate will be paid expenses during the internship. Interested applicants should send a brief cover letter and a CV to Jon Horrocks (jonathan@houldsworth.co.uk), with ‘Internship’ as a subject line. MORE HERE

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OPEN CALL | UK | Call for Artists | PhotoX Photography Prize – 30 April 2017

Building on the success of the ArtGemini Prize now in its fourth year, the prize founders are proud to announce the launch of PhotoX, an exciting new prize for established and emerging photographers with a cash fund of GBP2000, plus photographic prizes and two curated art exhibitions in London. The two exhibitions will take place at The Green Rooms and the New Artist Fair Truman Brewery. The prize is open to international artists and all styles and genres of photography. MORE HERE

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OPEN CALL | India | Art Residency | D.I.S.C. the Art  – 1 May 2017

D.I.S.C. the Art Textile Programme 2017 is currently accepting applications from visual artists for a residency in Odisha to gain access to the traditional Indian textile art. The residency will encourage artists to work with traditional techniques, such as Sacred Khadi to Double Ikat weaving, and authentic adivasi (indigenous) textiles. The 60 days residency will start on1  October 2017 and end on 29 November 2017. The Programme includes a journey to commence the residency, where artists will travel in rural Odisha to meet the artisans of traditional Odisha art. Artists will then have the opportunity to develop their work in a studio at base camp, which will culminate in an exhibition at the end of the programme. MORE HERE

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This is just a sample of art world opportunities we gather each week. If you’d like to see more, click here to sign up for more information on how to get full access and feeds of opportunities.

 

“ESCAPE from the SEA”: Japanese and Southeast Asian artists in Kuala Lumpur – in pictures

Japanese and Southeast Asian artists explore issues of identity, belongingness and history through the politics of borders in the region and beyond.

The group exhibition “ESCAPE from the SEA” closes on 23 April 2017 and is an extension of “Condition Report”, a curatorial development programme initiated by the Japan Foundation Asia Centre presenting four major collaborative exhibitions and 14 local art shows around Asia.

Ise (Roslisham Ismail), 'ChronoLOGICal', 2015, mixed media installation with objects and video. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Ise (Roslisham Ismail), ‘ChronoLOGICal’, 2015, mixed media installation with objects and video. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

“ESCAPE from the SEA” was launched in February 2017 by The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur, in collaboration with the National Art Gallery (NAG) and Art Printing Works Sdn. Bhd. (APW), as part of its collaborative art project “Condition Report” involving curators from Japan and Southeast Asia. “Condition Report” takes place in two parts, the first with four major collaborative exhibitions in Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, Manila and Bangkok, and the second with 14 local exhibitions, each curated by 14 shortlisted curatorial participants from the programme.

Zai Kuning, 'Phoenix', 2017, rattan and wax sculpture. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Zai Kuning, ‘Phoenix’, 2017, rattan and wax sculpture. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Aoyama Satoru, 'News From Nowhere', 2016/2017, mixed media installation with embroidery on vintage prints, duplicated 35mm slides and photographs. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Aoyama Satoru, ‘News From Nowhere’, 2016/2017, mixed media installation with embroidery on vintage prints, duplicated 35mm slides and photographs. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

“ESCAPE from the SEA” is the second major exhibition, and presents the work of 14 artists from Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Indonesia and Singapore, whose work considers issues of identity, belongingness and history through the politics of borders in this region and beyond. The show is held at NAG and APW in Kuala Lumpur until 23 April 2017, and is curated by Malaysian Yap Sau Bin and Japan’s Hiroyuki Hattori, with co-curators Alice Sarmiento (Philippines), Kurnia Yunita Rahayu (Indonesia), Souliya Phoumivong (Laos) and Goh Sze Ying (Malaysia).

yang02 + Ishige Kenta, 'Cargo Cult', 2017, installation with stand fans, ceiling fan, blanket dryer, hair dryer, robot cleaner, drills, dolls, toys, oil colour, acrylic colour, crayon, graphite, and canvas. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Yang02 + Ishige Kenta, ‘Cargo Cult’, 2017, installation with stand fans, ceiling fan, blanket dryer, hair dryer, robot cleaner, drills, dolls, toys, oil colour, acrylic colour, crayon, graphite, and canvas. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Ali Alasri, Faiq Syazwan Kuhiri, Mark Teh, and Wong Tay Sy, 'The Complete Futures of Malaysia, Chapter 1', resource centre, time capsule, evolving archive with wooden shelves, tables and neon lights. Image courtesy the artists and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Ali Alasri, Faiq Syazwan Kuhiri, Mark Teh, and Wong Tay Sy, ‘The Complete Futures of Malaysia, Chapter 1’, resource centre, time capsule, evolving archive with wooden shelves, tables and neon lights. Image courtesy the artists and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

The participating artists work in a range of media including film and video, installation, performance and research-based projects. The artists are:

  • Adam David (Philippines)
  • Aoyama Satoru (Japan)
  • Au Sow-Yee (Malaysia)
  • Catalina Africa Espinosa (Philippines)
  • Han Ishu (Japan)
  • Ismal Muntaha (Indonesia)
  • Jeffrey Lim (Malaysia)
  • Mark Teh, Ali Alasri, Faiq Syazwan Kuhiri and Wong Tay Sy (Malaysia)
  • Pangrok Sulap Collective (Malaysia)
  • Roslisham Ismail aka ISE (Malaysia)
  • Shitamichi Motoyuki (Japan)
  • Tita Salina (Indonesia)
  • Yang02 + Kenta Ishige (Japan)
  • Zai Kuning (Singapore)
Catalina Africa Espinosa, 'Studies on the Movement of Water', 2017, mixed media installation with video, printed tarpaulin, mirrors, desk lamp, felt and rock. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Catalina Africa Espinosa, ‘Studies on the Movement of Water’, 2017, mixed media installation with video, printed tarpaulin, mirrors, desk lamp, felt and rock. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Ismal Muntaha, 'Pulau Seribu Duyung (A Thousand Duyungs Island)', 2017, mixed media installation with objects, and video. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Ismal Muntaha, ‘Pulau Seribu Duyung (A Thousand Duyungs Island)’, 2017, mixed media installation with objects, and video. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Shitamichi Motoyuki, 'Story and exchanging water', 2017, mixed media installation with newspaper, map, water, text and sound. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Shitamichi Motoyuki, ‘Story and exchanging water’, 2017, mixed media installation with newspaper, map, water, text and sound. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

The sea as a (non)boundary

As the curatorial statement writes, the exhibition frames the sea as “both physical and metaphorical, defining maritime and geopolitical boundaries as well as representing a fluid state of boundlessness”. The title therefore “invokes an escape” from both a political and a poetic perspective. The curators enquire:

If escape implies a line of flight from, a way of slipping past, an act of eluding a limit or a border, where do we escape to? Here, the borders between home and neighbour, self and other, historic and contemporary, factual and fictive, real and imagined are negotiated, and while escape is requisite, arrival is never resolute.

Jeffrey Lim, 'Attachment', 2017, Abaca (Manila hemp) rope. Artist walks to and fro the two exhibition venues, connecting them with a single length of rope each time, doing so three times throughout the exhibition period. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Jeffrey Lim, ‘Attachment’, 2017, Abaca (Manila hemp) rope. Artist walks to and fro the two exhibition venues, connecting them with a single length of rope each time, doing so three times throughout the exhibition period. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Au Sow-Yeem, 'Kris Project 1: The Never Ending Tales of Maria, Tin Mine, Spices and the Harimau', 2016, mixed media installation with lightbox, single-channel video, index card box, objects, and documents. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Au Sow-Yeem, ‘Kris Project 1: The Never Ending Tales of Maria, Tin Mine, Spices and the Harimau’, 2016, mixed media installation with lightbox, single-channel video, index card box, objects, and documents. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

While some of the works on show respond directly to the notion of political borders and boundaries between sovereign lands and of bodies of water, others navigate the idea of private borders, inspired by personal life and experience to question public affairs. Others also explore the possibilities of the dissolution of borders, presenting a blurred view of the boundaries between what we know and what we can imagine, and thus a new vision of history, time and space.

Au Sow-Yee (b. 1978, Kuala Lumpur) questions, explores as well as expands the relation between images, image making, history, politics and power through video installation and other media. Au’s recent work focuses on a re-imagined history of Malaysia and Southeast Asia from perceptions and ideologies bounded by the Cold War.

Han Ishu, 'Hold Mirrors', 2017, mixed media installation with 32 hand mirrors, wood, tin can and video. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Han Ishu, ‘Hold Mirrors’, 2017, mixed media installation with 32 hand mirrors, wood, tin can and video. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Ise (Roslisham Ismail), 'ChronoLOGICal', 2015, mixed media installation with objects and video. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Ise (Roslisham Ismail), ‘ChronoLOGICal’, 2015, mixed media installation with objects and video. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Multidisciplinary artist Roslisham Ismail aka ISE (b. 1972, Kota Bharu, Malaysia) works with installation, video art and participatory projects, largely informed by expressions of popular culture, such as comics. He aims to represent alternative histories of place and culture. In ChronoLOGICal, ISE traces the history of his hometown in Kelantan, from as far back as 15,000 years ago to the present day. ISE juxtaposes Kelantan’s rich history with folklore, conjuring an image of it as a mythical and epic place.

Han Yishu, 'Great Round Table in Malaysia and The Weight Between You and Me', 2017, mixed media installation with kitchen scales, chopsticks, and bowls. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Han Yishu, ‘Great Round Table in Malaysia and The Weight Between You and Me’, 2017, mixed media installation with kitchen scales, chopsticks, and bowls. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Han Ishu (b. 1987, Shanghai, China) has lived most of his life in Japan, where he is currently based. With his duplicitous origins, Han has always been interested in issues of identity, belonging and migration, which form the core of his performance and visual art. Recently, he has also been focusing on relationships and distances with others. In Great Round Table – The weight between you and me, he uses kitchen scales, chopsticks and silverware to measure and comment on such relationship struggles, where differences and commonalities are always ‘weighed’ in order to keep some sort of balance.

Adam David, 'Of Native Shores: A Digest of 20th Century Philippine Poetry in English, Volume One ó 1914 to 1940', hardbound book with sandpaper cover and javascript programme. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Adam David, ‘Of Native Shores: A Digest of 20th Century Philippine Poetry in English, Volume One ó 1914 to 1940’, hardbound book with sandpaper cover and javascript programme. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Filipino artist Adam David (b. 1982, Quezon City) is a writer, book designer, critic and community organiser, largely responsible for the Philippines’ “largest” small press expo, Better Living Through Xeroxography. He reached popularity through his work It will be the same/but not quite the same, for which he was accused of four grounds of copyright infringement. David experiments with hypertext, using JavaScript randomisers to generate new forms of literary criticism. His work Of Native Shores continues on these explorations, and is presented here as both a 1,500-page book, printed and bound, and a hypertext randomiser that the audience can manipulate on site, further participating in the rewriting of history.

Tita Salina, '1001st Island ó The Most Sustainable Island in the Archipelago', 2015, single channel video. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Tita Salina, ‘1001st Island ó The Most Sustainable Island in the Archipelago’, 2015, single channel video. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Indonesia’s Tita Salina (b. 1973, Palembang) sees art as “a collection of memories that have stories”, each one capable of binding many things, from history, trends and technology, to personal experiences. Salina tests the limits of ‘elasticity’ by linking art to life and social patterns, creating new emotional bonds between ideas and events. In this way, art is used as an archaeological tool, through which the artist unearths and studies life. In her work 1001st Island Salina combines video, performance and social practice to explore issues of land reclamation and use, and the uncertainty of a future of displacement faced by traditional fishermen.

Zai Kuning, 'Riau', 2003., single channel video. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Zai Kuning, ‘Riau’, 2003, single channel video. Image courtesy the artist and The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

Zai Kuning, who will be representing Singapore at the 57th Venice Biennale opening in May 2017, presents Riau, a 30-minute film which also featured at the recently closed Singapore Biennale 2016. Since 2001, Zai has been focusing his work on drawings, music and research on Melayu history and the Orang Laut (sea gypsies) who are indigenous to the Riau Archipelago, a province of Indonesia located south of Singapore. In 2005, Riau was screened at the International Film Festival Rotterdam, Busan International Film Festival and 3rd Fukuoka Asian Art Triennial. The film documents Zai’s period of stay with the Orang Laut in a nomadic fishing village around the Riau islands. The work records impressions of the Orang Laut’s daily life, weaving them with the artist’s anecdotes, and presents a view of the dislocated histories embodied by the Orang Laut.

C. A. Xuan Mai Ardia

1652

Related Topics: Japanese artists, Southeast Asian artists, curatorial practice, museum shows, events in Kuala Lumpur

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“If You Throw Enough Mud at the Wall, None of It Will Stick”: Chinese artist Lin Aojie at A+ Contemporary, Shanghai

Guangzhou-based artist Lin Aojie transforms the art of keeping a diary into an artwork.

“If You Throw Enough Mud at the Wall, None of It Will Stick” runs at A+ Contemporary Shanghai until 7 May 2017, and features a diary-based series of textual and visual works revolving around the artist’s creative process, his dealings with the art world and his everyday experience.

Lin Aojie, "If You Throw Enough Mud at the Wall, None of It Will Stick", 17 March - 7 May 2017, A+ Contemporary, Shanghai. Installation view. Image curtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

Lin Aojie, “If You Throw Enough Mud at the Wall, None of It Will Stick”, 17 March – 7 May 2017, installation view at A+ Contemporary, Shanghai. Image curtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

Keeping a diary is a casual way to preserve memory and to elevate a personal perspective on everyday experience. It is the dominant voice in Guangzhou-based Lin Aojie’s exhibition “If You Throw Enough Mud At The Wall, None Of It Will Stick” at A+ Contemporary in Shanghai. Lin makes text accounts of his thoughts about the creative process, about visiting Shanghai and his dealings with galleries, even about his time spent in Starbucks. He also presents a pictorial history of his own work.

Lin Aojie, 'Diary of Freedom' (video stills), 2015, double channel video, colour, silent, 8min:06sec, edition of 5. Image courtesy of artist and A+ Contemporary.

Lin Aojie, ‘Diary of Freedom’ (video stills), 2015, double channel video, colour, silent, 8:06 min, edition of 5. Image courtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

Diaries

In 1963 an important diary was published in China. It contained the selfless reflections of Lei Feng, the model soldier of the Peoples’ Liberation Army. A typical entry would say:

“All high buildings and large mansions are built brick by brick. Why can I not be a brick? That is the reason everyday I do many trivial things.”

Lei was humble, doing his bit, helping others. His deeds and reflections tended to be almost too good to be true and were promoted by the Party as an example of righteous living. It is with a similar sense of incredulous wonder in the everyday that Lin relates his account of a week’s visit to Shanghai in Diary of Freedom (2015). Presented in dual language on two upright monitors that look as if they are only temporarily leaning against the wall, are banal accounts of visits, meals and conversations. These are juxtaposed with rousing aphorisms such as, “Small institutions around the globe please unite / Artists keep waiting / Artists-trashes keep deceiving—Awesome!!!”

Lin Aojie, ;You Left Me Off Your List (Part 1) & (Part 2)' (video stills), 2017, single channel video, colour, sound, 2min:18sec, 4min:10sec, edition of 5. Image courtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

Lin Aojie, ‘You Left Me Off Your List (Part 1) & (Part 2)’ (video stills), 2017, single channel video, colour, sound, 2:18 min, 4:10 min, edition of 5. Image courtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

Elsewhere there is a similar mood of inspiring poetic appeal. Another pair of videos with an intimate deadpan humour are presented on screens one above the other, but on different floors of the gallery. They show the artist and the Director of the Shanghai branch of A+ Contemporary in conversation. You Left Me Off Your List Part 1 (2017), screened downstairs, is set only about three metres away, just outside the gallery door. Lin asks if the director will consider dropping a group of gallery artists whom he says he does not like, and he presents her with a helpful list. The gesture seems arrogant but it is clearly not serious and in the video both protagonists stifle their laughter. You Left Me Off Your List Part 2 (2017) is a sequel where the director patiently explains that sometimes the gallery looks for future potential. The work suggests a learning process. Lin is callow, and his arrogance can be excused, because he needs to learn what galleries do.

Lin Aojie, 'Lead Your Way', 2017, 9.7 x 8.8 cm, edition of 3. Image courtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

Lin Aojie, ‘Lead Your Way’, 2017, 9.7 x 8.8 cm, edition of 3. Image courtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

Clumsy Statements

Many other works suggest naivety, or at least the utmost informality, as if Lin were unfamiliar with the formal procedures of exhibition making. Kevin (2017) and Lead Your Way (2016) are small, slightly silly cartoon drawings, glued directly on the wall. It’s up to Artist, When Boss is Gone (2017) is two black and white A4 photocopies in plastic pockets taped to the wall, while Bizarre Dream (2017), another diary item, is a small notebook, containing a poem remembering a dream. The notebook is found abandoned on the floor hidden behind one of the gallery’s architectural pillars.

Lin Aojie, 'Design Sketch', 2017, 21 x 29.7 x 9 cm, edition of 3. Image courtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

Lin Aojie, ‘Design Sketch’, 2017, 21 x 29.7 x 9 cm, edition of 3. Image courtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

Design Sketch (2017) is also tucked away, displayed beyond the public gallery in the office behind the reception desk. Wobbly, drawn by hand on an i-Pad, it is a hapless architectural rendering of A+ Contemporary’s environment, printed on nine A4 sheets pinned on a notice board. Considering A+ Contemporary’s meticulous and stylish spaces, the drawings do not give a very good impression and stand in opposition to slick digital architectural renderings. Lin’s interpretation of the conventions of the architectural genre challenges its flattering depictions with a pragmatist’s touch.

Lin Aojie, 'Self-Introduction' (video stills), 2016, single channel video, colour, sound, 20min:00sec, edition of 5. Image courtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

Lin Aojie, ‘Self-Introduction’ (video stills), 2016, single channel video, colour, sound, 20:00 min, edition of 5. Image courtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

In Self-introduction (2016) he approaches the presentation of his own work portfolio in a similar way. The work is again drawn on an i-Pad but this time the drawings are recorded as they are executed, a sort of animation. Each work produced in a six-year period is represented with a rapid line sketch. Although these are rudimentary and made relatively quickly, there are a lot of them and each receives a title written out in English as well as Chinese. This makes the experience of watching longwinded. The drawings themselves look like the jokey sketches of ex-Beatle John Lennon (1940 – 1980) and Lin’s attitude connects with Lennon’s occasional swaggering insolence, as well as with the soft radicalism that Lennon managed to combine with being an international megastar. This was exemplified by the 1969 recording of the anthem Give Peace a Chance at the ‘bed-in for peace’ in Montreal; seamlessly joining expensive hotels, international travel and popular anti-war protest.

Lin Aojie, 'Starbucks Left' (video stills), 2015, performance, text, video, 3min:37sec, edition of 5. Image courtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

Lin Aojie, ‘Starbucks Left’ (video stills), 2015, performance, text, video, 3:37 min, edition of 5. Image courtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

Lin’s Starbucks Left (2015) is an analogous gesture, attempting to fuse incompatible aspects of contemporary life together. He casts the ubiquitous international café business as a space for critique and dissent. The video comprises a series of unceremonious still images, views of Starbucks and its livery, provided with captions such as, “Nowhere would encourage us to think like Starbucks do.”, “Class struggle is still the focus of attention of Starbucks.” and “In Starbucks, instead of talking about business or life, we think about the society issues.”

Lin Aojie, 'Battle' (video stills), 2017, single channel video, black and white, sound, 2min:36sec, edition of 5. Image courtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

Lin Aojie, ‘Battle’ (video stills), 2017, single channel video, black and white, sound, 2:36 min, edition of 5. Image courtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

The struggle for truth

Dominating the main gallery space with a repetitive minimalist soundtrack is a large screen. Its scale and position suggest it is a definitive statement. However, the screen remains black while a line of text at the bottom, like a subtitle, tells of Lin’s struggle as an artist. The title, Battle (2017), aggrandises the narrative that has the artist summoning the mental strength to make good work and engage with galleries to a point where his work is exhibited – and the struggle was worth it: “And when I put it up, woohaa!” he cheers at the end. Like Lei Feng’s heartfelt reflections on his upright life, Lin’s account is candid but ambivalent when it comes to being believable.

Lin Aojie, "If You Throw Enough Mud at the Wall, None of It Will Stick", 17 March - 7 May 2017, A+ Contemporary, Shanghai. Installation view. Image curtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

Lin Aojie, “If You Throw Enough Mud at the Wall, None of It Will Stick”, 17 March – 7 May 2017, A+ Contemporary, Shanghai. Installation view. Image curtesy the artist and A+ Contemporary.

Lin too, like Lei, conceives of himself like a brick, making a small but necessary contribution in the art world. But he is an awkward fit, so his contribution does not reinforce, it ‘deconstructs’. The presentation of truth has become one of the defining anxieties of the present. The utterances of leaders, celebrities, armies, the media and independent bloggers, as well as both the still and moving image, are all regarded as suspect. By focusing not on final statements but what it is to be a participant, Lin explores just how fugitive sincerity has become.

Andrew Stooke

1644

Related Topics: Chinese artists, museum shows, video, events in Shanghai

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Rockbund Art Museum announces HUGO BOSS ASIA award 2017

Hugo Boss Asia announces their 12 nominators and six jury members for the 2017 award.

Designed to support emerging artists from Asia, the award also provides a curated exhibition for the finalists at the Shanghai-based Rockbund Art Museum.

Larys Frogier at the Rockbund Art Museum and HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award 2017 announcement. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum (RAM) and HUGO BOSS.

Larys Frogier at the Rockbund Art Museum and HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award 2017 announcement. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum (RAM) and HUGO BOSS.

In its third edition, the HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award will select emerging artists from Greater China and Southeast Asia. Leading independent curators, artists and cultural institutions will choose the 12 shortlisted artists.

Liu Yingjiu, Deputy Director of Rockbund Art Museum, and Adeline Ooi at the Rockbund Art Museum and HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award 2017 announcement. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum (RAM) and HUGO BOSS.

Liu Yingjiu, Deputy Director of Rockbund Art Museum, and Adeline Ooi at the Rockbund Art Museum and HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award 2017 announcement. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum (RAM) and HUGO BOSS.

The nominators of HUGO BOSS ASIA ART 2017 are:

  • Zoe Butt, Artistic Director, The Factory Contemporary Arts Centre, Ho Chi Minh City
  • Meiya Cheng, independent curator, Co-founder of Taipei Contemporary Art Center (TCAC)
  • Joselina Cruz, Director and Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art and Design (MCAD), Manila
  • Daniel Szehin Ho, Editor-in-chief and Co-founder of Ran Dian, based in Shanghai and Hong Kong
  • Lee Kit, artist, based in Hong Kong and Taipei
  • Aimee Lin, Co-founder and Editor of ArtReview Asia, based in Shanghai
  • David Teh, writer, curator and art advisor at the National University of Singapore
  • Karen Smith, curator, Executive Director of OCAT Xi’An, based in Shanghai
  • Alia Swastika, curator and writer, based in Jakarta
  • Wu Mo, PhD candidate, art critic and curator, based in Hong Kong
  • Yap Sau Bin, artist and educator, based in Kuala Lumpur
  • Ye Ying, Editor of The Art Newspaper China, based in Beijing
Larys Frogier, Patrizia Sandretto Re Rebaudengo and Marc Spieglers at the Rockbund Art Museum and HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award 2017 announcement. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum (RAM) and HUGO BOSS.

Larys Frogier, Patrizia Sandretto Re Rebaudengo and Marc Spieglers at the Rockbund Art Museum and HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award 2017 announcement. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum (RAM) and HUGO BOSS.

The finalists, to be announced in June 2017, will be chosen by a panel of experts led by Larys Frogier, Director of Rockbund Art Museum, Shanghai and the Chair of the HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Jury. Other jury members include Ute Meta Bauer, Yuko Hasegawa, Venus Lau, Adele Tan and Zhang Peili.

The four finalists will participate in a group exhibition at the Rockbund Art Museum (RAM) from 26 October 2017 to 7 January 2018, which will be curated by RAM senior curator Li Qi and will present newly commissioned works.

Cosmin Costinas, Alexandra Munroe and Sarah Eaton at the Rockbund Art Museum and HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award 2017 announcement. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum (RAM) and HUGO BOSS.

Cosmin Costinas, Alexandra Munroe and Sarah Eaton at the Rockbund Art Museum and HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award 2017 announcement. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum (RAM) and HUGO BOSS.

Awarded biannually, the previous winners include Hong Kong’s Kwan Sheung Chi in 2013 and Filipino artist Maria Taniguchi in 2015. By focusing on emerging artists, the award, as Larys Frogier observes, “celebrates the rich diversity, the fresh perspectives and new narratives of Asia’s emerging art scene”. Frogier further comments that

HUGO BOSS ASIA ART is marked by its extensive exhibition, research and education program, and together with the Award is able to reach an extensive audience through Rockbund Art Museum’s unique position in China, as a leading cultural institution enhancing its vision to support emerging contemporary artists in Asia. Through this, the program nurtures conversations between art communities in the region, and creates collaborations to further encourage and influence the development of contemporary art globally.

The Rockbund Art Museum and HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award 2017 announcement. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum (RAM) and HUGO BOSS.

The Rockbund Art Museum and HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award 2017 announcement. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum (RAM) and HUGO BOSS.

The award has a strong commitment to education and will deliver a number of programmes, workshops and public events around the exhibition at RAM. The award also supports a research platform that remains active throughout the period between the biennial awards.

Claire Wilson

1648

Related topics: art prizes, news, art awards, emerging artists

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Phillips appoints Lilly Chan as Managing Director of Asia

Former Christie’s Global Managing Director Lilly Chan appointed as Phillips Managing Director for Asia.

A late comer to Asia, Phillips is making up for lost time by attracting staff members of rival auction houses in their move to expand their presence in the region.

Lilly Chan portrait. Image courtesy Phillips.

Lilly Chan portrait. Image courtesy Phillips.

Phillips the Auctioneers has been trading since 1796 but it took until November 2016 for the auction house to hold an art auction in Asia. As a late entry to the region considered to be the emerging powerhouse of global art purchasing, Phillips is making up for lost time. The appointment of Lilly Chan as Managing Director of Asia is part of the internal restructuring designed to pit Phillips as a regional rival to the other international auction houses.

Since it has set its eyes on Asia, Phillips has been attracting staff over from its rivals: in May 2016 Jonathan Crockett, who worked for Sotheby’s for 11 years, was appointed as Head of 20th Century & Contemporary Art and Deputy Chairman for Asia at Phillips in May 2016. Now Ms Chan joins Phillips’ growing Hong Kong office from Christie’s, where she was previously Global Managing Director for Asian Art in Hong Kong, expanding department sales to Shanghai and Mumbai.

Jonathan Crockett, Head of 20th Century and Contemporary Art & Deputy Chairman for Phillips Asia. Image courtesy FT | Phillips.

Jonathan Crockett, Head of 20th Century and Contemporary Art & Deputy Chairman for Phillips Asia. Image courtesy FT | Phillips.

Ms Chan also had a stint working at JP Morgan Treasury Services, where she was Head of New Product Marketing for the Asia-Pacific market. Of her appointment, Edward Dolman, Chief Executive Officer of Phillips, stated:

A foremost priority for us has been to strengthen our presence in Asia and build relationships with collectors across the region – and a critical component in this ambitious plan is the appointment of an experienced managing director such as Lilly. I look forward to working with her and our entire Asian team to build our reputation as the most innovative auction house in the region.

Ms Chan will be working alongside Crockett, directing the expanding office in Hong Kong. She will also work closely with Terry Chu, recently named to lead the company’s Jewellery Department in Asia, Phillips’ Watches Department and the entire Asian team.

Phillips: 20th Century & Contemporary Art & Design Evening Sale, Hong Kong, 25 November, 2016. Image courtesy Phillips.

Phillips: 20th Century & Contemporary Art & Design Evening Sale, Hong Kong, 25 November 2016. Image courtesy Phillips.

In her new role, Ms Chan will play a key leadership role responsible for implementing and managing all strategic, procedural and operational aspects of the company in Asia with a focus on realising Phillips’ vision and strategic plan along with building the brand across Asia. Along with growing the Hong Kong office, Phillips has made a series of key appointments to boost its presence in Asia. In the past year, the company named Jane Yoon as the regional representative in Korea, Cindy Yen in Taiwan and Kyoko Hattori in Japan.

Rebecca Close

1649

Related Topics: business of artauctionsAsian artround-upsevents in Hong Kong

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Study with Art Radar – writing course now open!

Want to learn how to be a published art writer? Look no further!

If you’ve been thinking about studying art writing, you’ve come to the right place. Read on and follow along to find out more about our writing course and how to enrol as a student.

An Art Radar student conducts an interview in a Hong Kong gallery.

An Art Radar student conducts an interview in a Hong Kong gallery.

At Art Radar Institute, we help people learn new skills, connect with the art community and change their careers for the better with our flagship writing course, the Certificate in Art Journalism & Writing 101. Book your place now!

Here are just some of the comments we hear from our satisfied students:

I like that the institute is treating me like a real journalist and [I’m] not just learning with a teacher or professor. It is like I am a writer for Art Radar and I have an article to produce with a deadline. […] The entire course was fun and useful. I had a blast!

Kenesha Julius, St. Kitts & Nevis, 2016 alumna

It’s a clear, concise, systematic course. I have received an overall understanding about art writing. It gives me the opportunity to test which type of writing suits me most, so I can focus on more effectively. The feedback scheme also gives me more solutions and courage regarding how I can further work on my writing skills.

– Suquin, China, 2016 alumna

I found the writing of the article to be the most challenging: I was given a YouTube video as a starting point and the whole big world of my artist developed from there. We had great guidance and support all of the way through and I could feel my work changing with each submission. I am very pleased with my development through this course.

Barbara Eadie, Canada, 2014 alumna

It was great doing the Art Radar writing course, it has given me more self-confidence when it comes to writing about art and writing in English. Although I know there is still so much to learn and to improve, I now have the feeling that I can actually learn these things.

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If you would prefer to speak to someone in person to see if the course is right for you, contact Kate Cary Evans at kateevans88@yahoo.com or artradarinstitute@gmail.com.

 

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