Shanghai’s Rockbund Art Museum presents 11 stories from distinct regional cultures as they have evolved throughout the modern era.

“Tell Me a Story: Locality and Narrative” features 11 artists from across Asia who, by exploring their personal ties with the environment, reveal multiple facets of local life that are often left unheard or unseen.

Koki Tanaka, 'Provisional Studies: Workshop #1, “1946–52 Occupation Era and 1970 between Man and Matter”',2014–2015, action, workshop, video, documentation, dimensions variable. This project is realized with the support of Deutsche Bank and Parasophia: Kyoto International Festival of Contemporary Culture 2015. Installation detail. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum.

Koki Tanaka, ‘Provisional Studies: Workshop #1, “1946–52 Occupation Era and 1970 between Man and Matter”’,2014–2015, action, workshop, video, documentation, dimensions variable. This project is realized with the support of Deutsche Bank and Parasophia: Kyoto International Festival of Contemporary Culture 2015. Installation detail. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum.

MAP Office, 'Hong Kong is Land', 2014–2016, digital ink, drawing ink, pencil on paper, 825 x 260 cm; single channel video, colur, sound 5m:33s, 4’m:24s, 4m:13s, 3m:51s. Installation view. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum.

MAP Office, ‘Hong Kong is Land’, 2014–2016, digital ink, drawing ink, pencil on paper, 825 x 260 cm; single channel video, colur, sound, 5m:33s, 4’m:24s, 4m:13s, 3m:51s. Installation view. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum.

These are not short stories; they are never concise. There are no clear beginnings, middles or ends. Mostly the stories are rambling and indeterminate. Exhibition texts, provided in a 40-page booklet, include challenges such as “attempting to escape from linear historical narratives and arrive at the margins of historical memories by means of estranging narratives about the other”. The descriptions of the works in the exhibition guide are comprehensive. They outline the form and the content as well as the background research interests.

Field Recordings, 'Let the Water Flow', 2016, five-channel video installation. Installation view at Rockbund Art Museum. Image courtesy Andrew Stooke.

Field Recordings, ‘Let the Water Flow’, 2016, five-channel video installation. Installation view at Rockbund Art Museum. Image courtesy Andrew Stooke.

Tomoko Yoneda, 'The Island of Sakhalin', 2012, photo series, all images 65 x 83 cm. Installation view at Rockbund Art Museum. Image courtesy Andrew Stooke.

Tomoko Yoneda, ‘The Island of Sakhalin’, 2012, photo series, all images 65 x 83 cm. Installation view at Rockbund Art Museum. Image courtesy Andrew Stooke.

Another work that gets directly to the point is Tomoko Yoneda’s relatively elegiac photographs of abandoned industrial sites on Sakhalin Island – a historically disputed area, around a fifth the size of Japan – off the east coast of Russia. The images juxtapose decaying factories with rural landscapes, illustrating Yoneda’s comment in a previous interview with Asia Art Archive:

Some (photographs) relate to particular discourses with Japan and current conflicts. With research and accumulated information and images of the events in my memory, I like to visit and witness the actual places – I am startled by the normality of locations that once were the scene of momentous events.

In this iteration, “normality” seems to elide the complexities of the island’s past rather than expose it. Displaced ethnic minority groups, who were victims of territorial interests on the island, may not get the poetry in the exhibition’s evocation of the look of the factories that once provided their livelihood.

Haejun Jo and KyeongSoo Lee, 'A Ship Believing the Sea is the Land', 2014, installation view at Rockbund Art Museum. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum.

Haejun Jo and KyeongSoo Lee, ‘A Ship Believing the Sea is the Land’, 2014, installation view at Rockbund Art Museum. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum.

Haejun Jo and Kyeong Soo Lee, 'A Ship Believing the Sea is the Land', 2014, installation. Installation detail at Rockbund Art Museum. Image courtesy Andrew Stooke.

Haejun Jo and Kyeong Soo Lee, ‘A Ship Believing the Sea is the Land’, 2014, installation. Installation detail at Rockbund Art Museum. Image courtesy Andrew Stooke.

The photographs are the most explicit invocations of locality, while in other works, actual places are snared in exhibition making hardware and sunk behind extended research evidence. A Ship Believing the Sea is the Land by Korean artist duo Haejun Jo and Kyeong Soo Lee attempts to “reconstitute the memory of an entire era” with a mixture of elements, including text and drawings, sculpture and videos.

In the work a beached boat, features in the video playing on another wax sculpture of a boat. Both have lost contact with water, they don’t know themselves, they don’t know about drifting and floating. Their narratives tell of estrangement, things that seem flawed but are, in fact, misplaced.

Chen Chien-Jen, 'Friend Watan', 2013, single-channel video, colour, black and white, sound, 36m:47s. Image courtesy Andrew Stooke.

Chen Chieh-Jen, ‘Friend Watan’, 2013, single-channel video, colour, black and white, sound, 36m:47s. Image courtesy Andrew Stooke.

Alongside the video is Chen Chieh-Jen’s slow-paced 36-minute biopic docudrama Friend Watan (2013) about the artist’s unconventional career move from being a factory worker. It is a challenge to absorb all the material in one visit, even in just this part of the exhibition. These drawn-out, slow wandering actions signal an aesthetic opposition to the bravura of transatlantic culture. Exhibition curator Amy Cheng has previously cited anthropologist Kuan-Hsing Chen’s analysis:

In the past we (in Asia) have only looked towards Europe and the US. Looking back on the production of knowledge in art, we also discover that the majority of this knowledge was constructed based along the great production lines of Euramerican rhetoric.

Au Sow-Yee, 'The Kris Project I : The Never Ending Tale of Maria, Tin Mine, Spices and the Harimau', 2016, single channel video, object, document, light box, dimensions variable. This work is produced with the generous support from Rockbund Art Museum. Image courtesy the artist and Rockbund Art Museum.

Au Sow-Yee, ‘The Kris Project I : The Never Ending Tale of Maria, Tin Mine, Spices and the Harimau’, 2016, single channel video, object, document, light box, dimensions variable. This work is produced with the generous support from Rockbund Art Museum. Image courtesy the artist and Rockbund Art Museum.

Au Sow-Yee, 'The Kris Project I : The Never Ending Tale of Maria, Tin Mine, Spices and the Harimau', 2016, single channel video, object, document, light box, dimensions variable. This work is produced with the generous support from Rockbund Art Museum. Installation view. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum.

Au Sow-Yee, ‘The Kris Project I : The Never Ending Tale of Maria, Tin Mine, Spices and the Harimau’, 2016, single channel video, object, document, light box, dimensions variable. This work is produced with the generous support from Rockbund Art Museum. Installation view. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum.

If, locality in the art of Europe and the US might be exemplified by the indeterminate depopulated sites of Robert Smithson in the photo essay A Tour of the Monuments of Passaic, New Jersey (1967), Ed Ruscha’s Every Building on the Sunset Strip (1966) or Bernd and Hilla Becher’s ‘typologies’ of industrial architecture in Germany, the works here reject rigidity and classification.

The Grand Voyage: A Study on Name (2016) by Shanghai based artists Guo Xi and Zhang Jianling is staged in an inaccessible glass box, like a closed ecosystem. It is a kaleidoscopic theatrical montage from material that fuses reality, in the form of botanical taxonomy, with other “‘strands’ constructed, concocted, and imagined”.

Guo Xi and Zhang Jianling, 'The Grand Voyage: A Study on Name', 2016, photography, video, text, print, object, sound, dimensions variable. "The Grand Voyage" is supported by Imagokinetics and produced with the support from Rockbund Art Museum. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum.

Guo Xi and Zhang Jianling, ‘The Grand Voyage: A Study on Name’, 2016, photography, video, text, print, object, sound, dimensions variable. “The Grand Voyage” is supported by Imagokinetics and produced with the support from Rockbund Art Museum. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum.

Guo and Zhang present several discrete tableaus on tables. They suggest ongoing research activity, evoked through document collections, books, ephemera and video material. Images of these workstations are live streamed to other screens in the same dark space. The effect is to blur history. The momentum for the work is real characters and a real plant specimen, with speculative and tangential ideas unfolding in ever changing interrelationships. The myriad resources of the installation can be accessed from many viewpoints. At its heart is the relationship between Kusumoto Taki, the mother of Kusumoto Oine, the first female doctor in Japan, and German botanist Philipp Franz von Siebold. The effect is immersion in the rich changing shades and colours of a relationship, as if a relationship too were a particular instance of locality.

Guo Xi and Zhang Jianling, 'The Grand Voyage: A Study on Name', 2016, photography, video, text, print, object, sound, dimensions variable. "The Grand Voyage" is supported by Imagokinetics and produced with the support from Rockbund Art Museum. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum.

Guo Xi and Zhang Jianling, ‘The Grand Voyage: A Study on Name’, 2016, photography, video, text, print, object, sound, dimensions variable. “The Grand Voyage” is supported by Imagokinetics and produced with the support from Rockbund Art Museum. Image courtesy Rockbund Art Museum.

Su Yu-Hsien, 'Hua-Shan-Qiang' (video still), 2013, single channel video, colour, sound 21m:08s. Image courtesy the artist and Rockbund Art Museum.

Su Yu-Hsien, ‘Hua-Shan-Qiang’ (video still), 2013, single channel video, colour, sound
21m:08s. Image courtesy the artist and Rockbund Art Museum.

“Tell Me a Story” has the pace of a long novel. Rejecting spectacle, the exhibition shows the underlying truths that fictions can reveal, as well as challenging the assumption that localities have unity rather than being an impression produced through human interaction. Embodying evolutionary Asian creative and aesthetic identities, the works are optimistic, suggesting that through art it is possible to promote territorial flux, places secured not by flags, temples and monuments but by shared experiences.

Andrew Stooke

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Related Topics: gallery shows, events in Shanghai, video, identity, environmental art, Asian artists

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Brittney

By Brittney

Brittney is a writer, curator and contemporary art gallerist. Born in Singapore and based in New York City, Brittney maintains a deep interest in the contemporary art landscape of Southeast Asia. This is combined with an equally strong interest in contemporary art from the Asian diasporas, alongside the issues of identity, transmigration and global relations.

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