Art Radar selects 5 gallery highlights at Frieze London 2016.

Open from 6 to 9 October 2016, the 14th London edition of Frieze brings more than 160 of the world’s leading galleries to Regent’s Park.

Frieze London 2015. Image courtesy Frieze.

Frieze London 2015. Image courtesy Frieze.

Each year, Frieze London and Frieze Masters attract an international crowd of gallerists, artists and art lovers alike for a formidable display of established and up-and-coming talent. For the 14th edition of Frieze London, galleries offer works that explore how we relate art to the complicated machinations of society today. Ranging from expressive paintings that experiment with colour and line to multimedia installations, here are some of Art Radar‘s highlights from Frieze that focus on Asia’s best and emerging talents.

Yu Honglei, 'A Long Hot Summer'. Image courtesy Antenna Space.

Yu Honglei, ‘A Long Hot Summer’. Image courtesy Antenna Space.

1. Yu Honglei at Antenna Space

The Shanghai-based Antenna Space gallery presents sculptures by Yu Honglei, a Mongolian-born artist who lives and works in Beijing. Yu Honglei’s sculptures are immediately captivating with their bold blue palette, somewhere between a Matisse and an Yves Klein. Two massive panels stamped with Chinese totemic symbols are each complimented by a spray of blue beads emerging from a showerhead; the effect is both stultifying and curious, the vibrant colour drawing the viewer in, while the symbolism and repurposed hardware gives space to ponder.

Yu Honglei, 'Black Dragon River'. Image courtesy Antenna Space.

Yu Honglei, ‘Black Dragon River’. Image courtesy Antenna Space.

Mrinalini Mukherjee at Jhaveri Contemporary, Frieze Masters 2016. Image courtesy Jhaveri Contemporary.

Mrinalini Mukherjee at Jhaveri Contemporary, Frieze Masters 2016. Image courtesy Jhaveri Contemporary.

2. Mrinalini Mukherjee at Jhaveri Contemporary

In January 2015, the National Gallery of Modern Art in Delhi opened “Transfigurations”, a retrospective of the life’s work by sculptor Mrinalini Mukherjee’s life’s work. The artist herself would pass away a week after the opening, imbuing the already haunting, massive pieces with an invigorated feeling of presence. Mumbai-based Jhaveri Contemporary presents Mukherjee’s knotted hemp works at Frieze Masters, each of which offer the duality between form and material that so propelled Mukherjee as a master among her peers.

Mrinalini Mukherjee at Jhaveri Contemporary, Frieze Masters 2016. Image courtesy Jhaveri Contemporary.

Mrinalini Mukherjee at Jhaveri Contemporary, Frieze Masters 2016. Image courtesy Jhaveri Contemporary.

Yin-Ju Chen, 'Action at a Distance', 2015, three-channel synchronised video installation, colour, B&W, stereo sound, duration 9m:16s. Image courtesy the artist and Chi-Wen Gallery.

Yin-Ju Chen, ‘Action at a Distance’, 2015, three-channel synchronised video installation, colour, B&W, stereo sound, duration 9m:16s. Image courtesy the artist and Chi-Wen Gallery.

3. Yin-Ju Chen at Chi-Wen Gallery

Taipei-based multimedia artist Yin-Ju Chen interrogates relationships between state authority, self-embodiment and time in her three-channel video installation Action at a Distance at Chi-Wen’s booth in Frieze’s Focus section, dedicated to 32 galleries founded in or after 2004. Chi-Wen Gallery, based in Taipei, has a dedicated presence in cultivating the work of cutting-edge, experimental young artists. Yin-Ju Chen’s earlier works As Above, So Below (2013-14) and Liquidation Maps (2014) explored the uses of mysticism and astrology for healing bodily harm from massacres. In the work at Frieze the artist employs focused colour and black-and-white imagery to explore how quantum entanglement – where the state of a particle cannot be described independently from its surrounding particles – distances us from ourselves.

Yin-Ju Chen, 'Action at a Distance', 2015, three-channel synchronised video installation, colour, B&W, stereo sound, duration 9m:16s. Image courtesy the artist and Chi-Wen Gallery.

Yin-Ju Chen, ‘Action at a Distance’, 2015, three-channel synchronised video installation, colour, B&W, stereo sound, duration 9m:16s. Image courtesy the artist and Chi-Wen Gallery.

Neha Choksi, 'Blank invitation 11', 2016,, basalt, pulverised basalt on linen, brass, dimensions variable. Image courtesy the artist and Project 88.

Neha Choksi, ‘Blank invitation 11’, 2016,, basalt, pulverised basalt on linen, brass, dimensions variable. Image courtesy the artist and Project 88.

4. Neha Choksi at Project 88

For Neha Choksi, concerns of materiality lead to sublime experience. She is featured in the solo presentation “Stone Breath Mountain Dust” for Project 88’s booth at Frieze London. One of the works, Blank Invitation, consists of brass and basalt sculptures amidst a brilliant blue curtain screenprinted with rock formations, recalling both the desert landscape of California and the blue waters of Mumbai – the two cities she currently lives between. Choksi, who has exhibited at Whitechapel Gallery, the 2014 Kochi-Muziris Biennale and the 20th Biennale of Sydney, among others, presents the material plasticity of her objects while working to destabilise the ideas of strength and hardness we attribute to both.

Neha Choksi, 'An ending and a beginning' series (detail), 2016, frottage with graphite on paper, maple frame, alternate hanging sizes: 35 x 48 in; 48 x 35 cm. Image courtesy the artist and Project 88.

Neha Choksi, ‘An ending and a beginning’ series (detail), 2016, frottage with graphite on paper, maple frame, alternate hanging sizes: 35 x 48 in; 48 x 35 cm. Image courtesy the artist and Project 88.

Ouyang Chun, 'Prison', 2011, oil on canvas, 150 x 190 cm. Image courtesy ShanghART.

Ouyang Chun, ‘Prison’, 2011, oil on canvas, 150 x 190 cm. Image courtesy ShanghART.

5. Ouyang Chun at ShanghART

ShangART’s Ouyang Chun (b. 1974) also is a keystone in Frieze’s Focus section. Chun’s works range from thickly applied oil works on canvas exuding a naive curiosity towards life to a precarious sculpture, Infinity Column, comprising a range of items from a desk globe to a brass bust and skateboard. The sculpture/assemblage the process of consuming of materials and life, communicating a “sense of poetry and deterioration”. Chun’s Psychosis series of paintings are at once playful and darkly comic, figurative works that touch on the mundane and macabre aspects of daily life, portraying an imaginary space full of contradictions.

Tausif Noor

1339

Related Topics: Chinese artists, Indian artists, Taiwanese artists, gallery shows, art fairs, events in London

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By Brittney

Brittney is a writer, curator and contemporary art gallerist. Born in Singapore and based in New York City, Brittney maintains a deep interest in the contemporary art landscape of Southeast Asia. This is combined with an equally strong interest in contemporary art from the Asian diasporas, alongside the issues of identity, transmigration and global relations.

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