SculptureCenter holds latest exhibition of work by Cercle d’Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise until 27 March 2017.

CAPTC is a union of Congolese plantation workers who harvest primary raw materials for international export companies. With the same materials, the workers also create sculptures in collaboration with their sister organisation, the Institute for Human Activities.

Cercle d'Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 29 January - 27 March 2017, SculptureCenter, New York. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

Cercle d’Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 29 January – 27 March 2017, SculptureCenter, New York. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

Under a classical Marxist approach, the distinction between art and alienated forms of wage-earning labour does not uphold: artists, rather than romantic agents of their own lives, are subject to the same processes of production, commodification and property as all other workers. Walter Benjamin, drawing on these analyses, posited that in the new age of modernism buoyed by the technology of mechanical reproduction, art would lose its aura – its distinct aesthetic quality – as it was reproduced again and again by machines. This central concern, of whether art and labour are indeed strange bedfellows, is at the heart SculptureCenter’s latest exhibition of work in its Long Island City space by the Cercle d’Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League or CATPC).

Cercle d'Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 29 January - 27 March 2017, SculptureCenter, New York. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

Cercle d’Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 29 January – 27 March 2017, SculptureCenter, New York. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

Cercle d’Art, or CATPC is a union of Congolese plantation workers who harvest primary raw materials for international export companies that produce chocolate and palm oil, for instance. Using these same raw materials, however, the workers also create sculptures in collaboration with their sister organisation, the Institute for Human Activities (IHA). Founded in 2014 by the Dutch artist Renzo Martens, the IHA began its activities – exhibitions, presentations, conferences, lectures – in the Congo in 2012 to address economic inequality in both theoretical and material terms. Plantation workers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are paid a minimum wage that is barely sustainable to sustain their families, but the sales of their artistic products often generate multiple times what they are able to make in a year by working on the plantation alone.

Thomas Leba working on 'A Lucky Day', 2015. Image courtesy Cercle d’Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise.

Thomas Leba working on ‘A Lucky Day’, 2015. Image courtesy Cercle d’Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise.

Cercle d'Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 29 January - 27 March 2017, SculptureCenter, New York. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

Cercle d’Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 29 January – 27 March 2017, SculptureCenter, New York. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

Cercle d'Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 29 January - 27 March 2017, SculptureCenter, New York. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

Cercle d’Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 29 January – 27 March 2017, SculptureCenter, New York. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

Cercle d'Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 29 January - 27 March 2017, SculptureCenter, New York. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

Cercle d’Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 29 January – 27 March 2017, SculptureCenter, New York. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

The sculptures on display at SculptureCenter are not coated in the finished chocolate, but in cacao; other sculptures that CATPC sells for profit, however, do utilise the Belgian chocolate product. The entire process – from the extraction of primary source materials, to the trade routes to the Dutch capital, to its eventual exhibition in the United States – mirrors the flows of global capital and trade that defined the period of European colonialism in West Africa. In recreating this system of exchange, ethical questions arise: is there exploitation embedded in the process? Can art be truly transformative at an economic level?

Cercle d'Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 29 January - 27 March 2017, SculptureCenter, New York. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

Cercle d’Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 29 January – 27 March 2017, SculptureCenter, New York. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

Judging by the precision of the works and the scrutiny with which the entire production process is handled, the answer might be yes. Martens’ partnership with René Ngongo, the current president, began during his initial trip to the Congo for his 2008 film project Enjoy Poverty, in which Martens encouraged Congolese photographers, artists and art practitioners to capitalise on poverty images as an income-generating activity. Through this project, he met and interviewed Ngongo, who would go on to develop CATPC alongside workers from the plantation, including Mathieu Kilapi Kasiama, Cedrick Tamasala, Mbuku Kimpala, Mananga Kibuila, Thomas Leba. The organisation expanded to include artists from Kinshasa, Michel Ekeba, Eléonore Hellio and Mega Mingiedi, and is ever-expanding, encouraging new members to join in the project and the development of LIRCAEI.

Cercle d'Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 29 January - 27 March 2017, SculptureCenter, New York. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

Cercle d’Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 29 January – 27 March 2017, SculptureCenter, New York. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

Cercle d'Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 29 January - 27 March 2017, SculptureCenter, New York. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

Cercle d’Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 29 January – 27 March 2017, SculptureCenter, New York. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

Cercle d'Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), 'Tamasala'. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

Cercle d’Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League), ‘Tamasala’. Image courtesy CATPC | SculptureCenter.

If Marxian analysis emphasises the degree to which workers are alienated from the products of their labour, then the exhibition at SculptureCenter, at one level, addresses the possibility of filling in this gap and attending to the intricacies of human involvement in artistic production. It’s not a perfect model, but gets as close as it can to rectifying the entangled networks of labour that have so defined contemporary economics and politics.

Tausif Noor

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Related Topics: Congolese artists, sculpture, identity art, art and the community, events in New York

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Brittney

By Brittney

Brittney is a writer, curator and contemporary art gallerist. Born in Singapore and based in New York City, Brittney maintains a deep interest in the contemporary art landscape of Southeast Asia. This is combined with an equally strong interest in contemporary art from the Asian diasporas, alongside the issues of identity, transmigration and global relations.

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