Harper’s Bazaar Indonesia launches this year’s Art Jakarta on 28 July 2017, gathering exhibitors within the 7,500-square-metre Ballroom of The Ritz-Carlton.

Art Radar takes you through the first-established and biggest art fair in Indonesia and looks at 5 galleries from 5 different countries.

The Opening of Art Jakarta, 2016. Image courtesy Art Jakarta.

Visitors at the opening of Art Jakarta, 2016. Image courtesy Art Jakarta.

At its ninth edition, Art Jakarta opens to the public on 28 July 2017. With an attendance of more than 45,000 and 42 participating galleries last year, the Indonesian fair retains its position as one of Asia’s most exciting art events for the season.

Art Radar previews 5 gallery presentations at this year’s edition of the fair.

Kim Tschang-Yeul, 'Waterdrops', 2017, acrylic and oil on canvas, 195 x 60 cm. Image courtesy Pearl Lam Galleries.

Kim Tschang-Yeul, ‘Waterdrops’, 2017, acrylic and oil on canvas, 195 x 60 cm. Image courtesy of the artist and Pearl Lam Galleries.

1. Pearl Lam Galleries (Hong Kong/Shanghai/Singapore)

Korean master painter Kim Tschang-Yeul (b. 1929, present-day North Korea) will make his Indonesian debut at Pearl Lam Galleries’ booth this summer at Art Jakarta. The artist is best known as one of the leaders of the Korean Art Informel movement, which gained traction during the 1950s and 1960s. Pearl Lam Galleries will be presenting one of his signature “water drop” paintings, known for their heightened photorealist qualities. In Waterdrops, an oversized, single, solitary droplet trails down a narrow brown canvas.

The trauma and grief experienced during the Korean War became the motivation for creating the waterdrop paintings, as Kim sought relief from the continuous act of painting the droplets over and over again. He has had solo exhibitions mounted at institutions such as the Gwangju Museum of Art, Gwangju (Korea), National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts (Taiwan) and Busan Museum of Art, Busan (Korea). In 2016, the Kim Tschang-Yeul Museum of Art opened in Jeju island, Korea to honour the artist.

Boedi Widjaja, '放下武器跟我走 (Lay down your weapon, follow me)', 2016, 28 peci pinhole negatives on Ilford paper, 28 pecis, brass, foam, vintage camera tripod, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Yavuz Gallery.

Boedi Widjaja, ‘放下武器跟我走 (Lay Down Your Weapon, Follow Me)’, 2016, 28 peci pinhole negatives on Ilford paper, 28 pecis, brass, foam, vintage camera tripod, dimensions variable. Image courtesy the artist and Yavuz Gallery.

2. Yavuz Gallery (Singapore)

A newcomer to the fair, Yavuz Gallery’s first presentation at Ar Jakarta showcases two artists: Indonesian-born, Singapore-based Boedi Widjaja (b. 1975, Solo City, Indonesia), and Paris-born, Istanbul-raised SARP (b. 1991, Paris, France).

Boedi Widjaja’s Lay Down Your Weapon, Follow Me (2016) is constructed out of 28 pinhole cameras in four tiers of seven, held in place by a central brass ring. Covered by pecis, the pinhole cameras produce negative print images of the former president of Indonesia, Sukarno, delivering speeches in various locations. Inspired by the peci as a symbol or emblem of national identity, Widjaja’s work ruminates over the Indonesian identity from the standpoint of one who spent a large part of his life away from his birthplace. Widjaja spent a large part of his formative years away from his parents, and, as he puts it, often “rotating amongst stranger-families”. His works probe themes regarding belonging and diaspora. His work is also being currently shown at the Diaspora Pavilion at this year’s edition of the Venice Biennale.

SARP, ‘Dua’, 2016, archival print, 120 x 180 cm. Image courtesy the artist and Yavuz Gallery.

Dominic Rubio, 'Cultures Intertwined', 2012, oil on canvas, 91 x 121 cm. Image courtesy Galerie Joaquin.

Dominic Rubio, ‘Cultures Intertwined’, 2012, oil on canvas, 91 x 121 cm. Image courtesy Galerie Joaquin.

3. Galerie Joaquin (Philippines)

With long, thin necks, oversized heads and traditional garb, Dominic Rubio’s (b. 1970, Laguna, Philippines) trademark figures evoke Philippine’s colonial past. Drawing on genres and techniques of painting that developed during the years of Spanish colonisation, such as the Tipos de Pais style of painting created by seminal Filipino painter Damian Domingo, Rubio often depicts his figures in idyllic, recreational family settings.

Dominic Rubio, 'Bustling Marketplace', 2012, oil on canvas, 121 x 121 cm. Image courtesy Galerie Joaquin.

Dominic Rubio, ‘Bustling Marketplace’, 2012, oil on canvas, 121 x 121 cm. Image courtesy Galerie Joaquin.

Rubio’s works seem to romanticise the years of Spanish colonial history; yet, upon closer inspection, Rubio speaks to the nostalgia surrounding the past. His works stylise, almost to the point of making it surreal, common Philippine notions of their collective past, building on traditional drawings created by painters such as Domingo that lend the Philippine colonial years their distinct visual identity in books and other popular media.

Rubio has held shows in New York, Hong Kong and Singapore. In 2016, he unveiled a mural entitled The Great Promenade of Philippine-American Friendship that has become a landmark feature at the Philippine Embassy in Washington DC.

Pannaphan Yodmanee, 'The powerful emotions of the ocean', 2016, mixed media on canvas, 180 x 100 cm. Image courtesy La Lanta Fine Art.

Pannaphan Yodmanee, ‘The Powerful Emotions of the Ocean’, 2016, mixed media on canvas, 180 x 100 cm. Image courtesy La Lanta Fine Art.

5. La Lanta Fine Art (Thailand)

With four Thai artists, La Lanta Fine Art is a booth not to be missed. Emerging artist Pannaphan Yodmanee (b. 1988) will be presented at La Lanta Fine Art’s booth. Yodmanee’s works often revolve around Buddhist philosophy and concepts, creating works that incorporate found objects, rocks, minerals and other material that are arranged into beautiful abstract works. At Art Jakarta 2017, her work The Powerful Emotions of the Ocean (2016) depicts a rolling ocean, resembling a marbled texture that conveys the strength of the ocean waves. Yodmanee investigates the human phenomena of loss and devastation, as well as notions of karmic cycles of life. Questing towards reason and truth, Yodmanee has received several accolades, including  the 11th Benesse Prize at Singapore Biennale (2016), top prizes in the Thai Traditional Painting Awards (2013), as well as the Young Thai Artist Awards (2006 – 2007).

Chamnan Chongpaiboon, 'She on cool grey', 2016, acrylic on canvas, 100 x120 cm. Image courtesy La Lanta Fine Art.

Chamnan Chongpaiboon, ‘She on Cool Grey’, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 100 x 120 cm. Image courtesy La Lanta Fine Art.

Also at the booth will be a work by Chamnan Chongpaiboon, an artist with a flair for colour and a loud graphic style. Influenced by pointillism and Aboriginal dotting techniques, Chongpaiboon forms a unique visual language through the merger of these two distinct styles. His works often incorporate continuous streams of dots into upbeat, pop art works that often depict women in fashion-inspired images.

Junni Chen

1783

Related topics: Asian artists, market watchart fairs, business of art, gallery shows, collectors, events in Jakarta

Related posts:

Subscribe to Art Radar for more on art fairs in Indonesia

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Brittney

By Brittney

Brittney is a writer, curator and contemporary art gallerist. Born in Singapore and based in New York City, Brittney maintains a deep interest in the contemporary art landscape of Southeast Asia. This is combined with an equally strong interest in contemporary art from the Asian diasporas, alongside the issues of identity, transmigration and global relations.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *